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583 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1046099 16-May-2014 09:48
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If it's OP's first offense, he'll likely get diversion.
Regardless of ethnicity he'll be weeding gardens or mowing lawns.

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046103 16-May-2014 09:57
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As someone else has posted, Corrections will place you based upon resources available etc but also taking into account of your links to the local community and so forth. But before the OP even contemplates jail, tell us how much you were allegedly supplying. I ask this not out of prurient interest but as someone who's worked on two sides of the criminal justice fence (for the judiciary and the prosecution side), I actually can give you a decent guess of what's coming based on how much you supposedly had (presumption of innocence and all that) on the basis on the relevant guideline judgments.

General advice: play your cards right. If the stuff is yours and your lawyer tells you that you're likely to be found guilty, then don't muck around trying to put up a stupid fight. Plead guilty and get your 25 to 33% discount. If it's just a small home-based operation, chances are the worst that's coming for you is home detention, assuming your home is suitable (i.e. has cell phone coverage for the monitoring bracelet and that you don't live with any ex-cons or other undesirables). But if you want a more precise estimate, let me know the quantity.



 
 
 
 


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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046104 16-May-2014 09:57
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Is it this by chance?
[removed]

E
dit: clearly not, should have read the article fully before I posted




Location: Dunedin

646 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1046106 16-May-2014 10:05
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queenstown: Who decides which prison you go to? Which prison do you go to if your from Queenstown? Got busted for possession with intent to supply cannabis



Police did a good job then.
Hope they get a raise.






NZ / AU Battlefield 4 Gaming Community
http://www.sonsofvalour.net/forums/forum.php

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046107 16-May-2014 10:13
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OP: Since maybe you haven't gone to court yet...maybe discussing details of your accused crime on a public forum isn't a super great idea



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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046111 16-May-2014 10:26
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lokhor:
Sidestep:
lokhor: Unless he is of Maori descent, in which case he is pretty well screwed.

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/snapshots-of-nz/yearbook/society/crime/corrections.aspx



That's not bias in the courts though.
It's a reflection of societal problems that have young Maori over represented in appearances before the courts in the first place.


You are wrong:
http://www.corrections.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/672574/Over-representation-of-Maori-in-the-criminal-justice-system.pdf

When self-reported offending (and social background) was held constant,
Māori offenders appeared still to be twice as likely to be subject to Police attention,
relative to non-Māori offenders.

A more recent analysis of the same sample, now aged 21, indicated a smaller but
similar effect related to arrest and conviction for cannabis use. This study examined
the associations between the self-reported use of cannabis, and arrest and
conviction for cannabis related offences. Independently of self-declared cannabis
use, Māori were more likely to be arrested and convicted for cannabis use. Previous
police record, self-reported crime, and being male also increased the likelihood of
arrest and conviction. Fergusson et al found this “consistent with a labelling theory
perspective”.


It also shows that Maori are more likely to be imprisoned, rather than receive monetary fines or home detention. 


That's probably because the ones in question usually have no money and/or cannot be trusted with home detention.





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  Reply # 1046114 16-May-2014 10:31
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Maybe I should have added "Fortunately for most offenders, not me!" There would presently be a building project on the Kermadecs if I was in charge..!

However in this case were I the judge I would sentence you to the least possible because I think it's a stupid 'crime'.





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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046130 16-May-2014 10:39
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Geektastic:
lokhor:
Sidestep:
lokhor: Unless he is of Maori descent, in which case he is pretty well screwed.

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/snapshots-of-nz/yearbook/society/crime/corrections.aspx



That's not bias in the courts though.
It's a reflection of societal problems that have young Maori over represented in appearances before the courts in the first place.


You are wrong:
http://www.corrections.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/672574/Over-representation-of-Maori-in-the-criminal-justice-system.pdf

When self-reported offending (and social background) was held constant,
Māori offenders appeared still to be twice as likely to be subject to Police attention,
relative to non-Māori offenders.

A more recent analysis of the same sample, now aged 21, indicated a smaller but
similar effect related to arrest and conviction for cannabis use. This study examined
the associations between the self-reported use of cannabis, and arrest and
conviction for cannabis related offences. Independently of self-declared cannabis
use, Māori were more likely to be arrested and convicted for cannabis use. Previous
police record, self-reported crime, and being male also increased the likelihood of
arrest and conviction. Fergusson et al found this “consistent with a labelling theory
perspective”.


It also shows that Maori are more likely to be imprisoned, rather than receive monetary fines or home detention. 


That's probably because the ones in question usually have no money and/or cannot be trusted with home detention.


Speaking of money, I'd wager that there would be a similar correlation between "wealth" and imprisonment rates as there is with "ethnicity".

Section 8(i) of the Sentencing Act was apparently supposed to address the imbalance, but of course because it can't discriminate based on ethnicity or wealth, in practice it's of much more use to rich kids (of any ethnicity) with expensive lawyers arguing their case than it was ever going to be for any socially disadvantaged group.

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  Reply # 1046193 16-May-2014 11:50
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Fred99:
Geektastic:
lokhor:
Sidestep:
lokhor: Unless he is of Maori descent, in which case he is pretty well screwed.

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/snapshots-of-nz/yearbook/society/crime/corrections.aspx



That's not bias in the courts though.
It's a reflection of societal problems that have young Maori over represented in appearances before the courts in the first place.


You are wrong:
http://www.corrections.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/672574/Over-representation-of-Maori-in-the-criminal-justice-system.pdf

When self-reported offending (and social background) was held constant,
Māori offenders appeared still to be twice as likely to be subject to Police attention,
relative to non-Māori offenders.

A more recent analysis of the same sample, now aged 21, indicated a smaller but
similar effect related to arrest and conviction for cannabis use. This study examined
the associations between the self-reported use of cannabis, and arrest and
conviction for cannabis related offences. Independently of self-declared cannabis
use, Māori were more likely to be arrested and convicted for cannabis use. Previous
police record, self-reported crime, and being male also increased the likelihood of
arrest and conviction. Fergusson et al found this “consistent with a labelling theory
perspective”.


It also shows that Maori are more likely to be imprisoned, rather than receive monetary fines or home detention. 


That's probably because the ones in question usually have no money and/or cannot be trusted with home detention.


Speaking of money, I'd wager that there would be a similar correlation between "wealth" and imprisonment rates as there is with "ethnicity".

Section 8(i) of the Sentencing Act was apparently supposed to address the imbalance, but of course because it can't discriminate based on ethnicity or wealth, in practice it's of much more use to rich kids (of any ethnicity) with expensive lawyers arguing their case than it was ever going to be for any socially disadvantaged group.


Being rich has advantages, otherwise who would bother making the efforts required to get there?





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  Reply # 1046219 16-May-2014 12:18
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Geektastic:
Fred99:
Geektastic:
lokhor:
Sidestep:
lokhor: Unless he is of Maori descent, in which case he is pretty well screwed.

http://www.stats.govt.nz/browse_for_stats/snapshots-of-nz/yearbook/society/crime/corrections.aspx



That's not bias in the courts though.
It's a reflection of societal problems that have young Maori over represented in appearances before the courts in the first place.


You are wrong:
http://www.corrections.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/672574/Over-representation-of-Maori-in-the-criminal-justice-system.pdf

When self-reported offending (and social background) was held constant,
Māori offenders appeared still to be twice as likely to be subject to Police attention,
relative to non-Māori offenders.

A more recent analysis of the same sample, now aged 21, indicated a smaller but
similar effect related to arrest and conviction for cannabis use. This study examined
the associations between the self-reported use of cannabis, and arrest and
conviction for cannabis related offences. Independently of self-declared cannabis
use, Māori were more likely to be arrested and convicted for cannabis use. Previous
police record, self-reported crime, and being male also increased the likelihood of
arrest and conviction. Fergusson et al found this “consistent with a labelling theory
perspective”.


It also shows that Maori are more likely to be imprisoned, rather than receive monetary fines or home detention. 


That's probably because the ones in question usually have no money and/or cannot be trusted with home detention.


Speaking of money, I'd wager that there would be a similar correlation between "wealth" and imprisonment rates as there is with "ethnicity".

Section 8(i) of the Sentencing Act was apparently supposed to address the imbalance, but of course because it can't discriminate based on ethnicity or wealth, in practice it's of much more use to rich kids (of any ethnicity) with expensive lawyers arguing their case than it was ever going to be for any socially disadvantaged group.


Being rich has advantages, otherwise who would bother making the efforts required to get there?


Being born advantaged has considerable benefit too, as it considerably reduces the efforts required to become rich.  With almost every measure of "success", the strongest correlation is having wealthy parents.  Of course we love the exceptions, rags to riches stories as well as seeing the rich fall hard are immensely popular.
So you either accept that "as the nature of things", deny it (which isn't a credible position to take - despite being a disturbingly widely held opinion these days), or try to do something about it.
"Dong something about it" usually involves wealth redistribution and or sometimes "positive" discrimination - and is often vehemently opposed by some who have become rich, this may undeniably be through their own hard work, and they could rightly see this discrimination against themselves as somewhat "unfair".
I suspect the default position is that most (reasonably well-off) people quietly accept this as the nature of things, but make some concessions which at face value might seem offer solutions (to makes ourselves feel better?), but in reality have never really achieved much at all.  If we keep doing what we've always done, we're going to keep getting what we've always got.

gjm

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1046237 16-May-2014 12:56
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I think you'd have more to worry about if you were riding a quad bike on a farm without a helmet on.




[Amstrad CPC 6128: 128k Memory: 3 inch floppy drive: Colour Screen]



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Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 1046241 16-May-2014 13:02
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Well i did get busted for cultivation before.This time i got caught with 7 $50's and $300.And i told them i bought an ounce a week since march Im unemployed but when they asked where i got it from i told them i got money of my mum.Really dont want my mum to find out she spent money on my lawyer before.Now im just going to legal aid it.

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  Reply # 1046256 16-May-2014 13:10
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I think Ben Dover and Tay Kit decide which prison, don't they?

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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1046263 16-May-2014 13:23
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Sorry to be blunt but do the crime, do the time.  +1 for the police.

But like others I suspect an all expenses paid holiday is unlikely on the cards, depending on some missing details such as conviction history, quantity circumstances etc.   

The OP appears to have accepted guilt and resigned to being convicted.  I suggest it is time to reflect and get a a new (legal) hobby.








Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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Reply # 1046267 16-May-2014 13:34
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muppet: I think Ben Dover and Tay Kit decide which prison, don't they?


excuse while I pi$$ myself laughing

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