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Topic # 146855 31-May-2014 11:56
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With the forever promised wearable technology, I was wondering if anyone knew of a wearable device That "monitored" your heart rate and feed that information back to a base (computer). There seems to be lots of devices now on the mrket but as far as I can tell, they are all deceptive as they say about heart rate monitoring but what they mean is if you push the button then connect with a usb then ...blah blah blah.

1.So wear on the wrist
2. wifi
3. feeds info back to base at regular intervals




Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

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  Reply # 1057016 31-May-2014 12:08
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You need something like the http://www.exmovere.com/Empath/ :-)



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  Reply # 1057480 1-Jun-2014 12:26
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Lurch: You need something like the http://www.exmovere.com/Empath/ :-)


Dont know what to believe of any of this but where there theres mud...

http://www.ripoffreport.com/reports/directory/exmovere-holdings




Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

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  Reply # 1057534 1-Jun-2014 14:00
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There are plenty of heart rate monitors out there that sync with your mobile, usually requiring a special app, and you can then view the data at a later time online. 
Most of them require a chest strap for heart rate monitoring, not a wrist sensor. 
With ant+ compatibly products you are match a 'receiver' with a 'transmitter' that best suits you.

What exactly are you wanting to achieve? as most are not suitable for walking or day to day use. They are best for high heart rate activities.



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  Reply # 1057707 1-Jun-2014 21:15
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rscole86: There are plenty of heart rate monitors out there that sync with your mobile, usually requiring a special app, and you can then view the data at a later time online. 
Most of them require a chest strap for heart rate monitoring, not a wrist sensor. 
With ant+ compatibly products you are match a 'receiver' with a 'transmitter' that best suits you.

What exactly are you wanting to achieve? as most are not suitable for walking or day to day use. They are best for high heart rate activities.


Ok so I am one heart attack down. Maybe i have put the horse before the cart , by way of discovery. I assume if one monitors the heart rate you will be able to predict possibility of a second attack?

As ai say I havnt asked my doc or anything it was my own little theory, maybe I read it somewhere?




Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

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  Reply # 1057737 1-Jun-2014 22:33
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hi you need to ask your heart specialist. as far as I know a heart rate monitor cannot predict a heart attack.

a standard heart attack (the classical form that happens to most people) is caused by little sticky things called platelets attracted to a bit of a heart pipe that is abnormal - usually also have bits of things called a "cholesterol plaque" - these sticky little fellas then form a clot which either blocks off the heart pipe there or bits of it breaks off and blocks off down the track. that's a heart attack. what you have felt leading up to your first heart attack is probably the best indicator of the subsequent ones I reckon, but hey again, you need to confirm this with your heart specialist.

sometimes electrical activity can change during periods of pre-heart attack. sometimes they don't. it all depends on your platelet friends and what they do to those abnormal bits of pipe. you can have abnormal pipes (most people over a certain age have them) and no platelet party. you can have abnormal pipes and attract happy platelet party -> risk of heart attack. you can have 3 abnormal pipe, a heart attack, 3 metal bits to push out the abnormal narrowing, and no more platelet party, or the metal bits can cause other bits and cause a party -> heart attack.

I'm still going with what you felt leading up to the first time being the best indicator. some people feel nothing leading up ... that's probably going to continue. again, I suggest you ask someone who actually knows! not the internet! or you get random people giving their opinion!



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  Reply # 1057749 1-Jun-2014 23:18
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Oh no I much prefer to ask you guys The answers are so much more interesting than the doctors. The information is way above my pay grade! I was going with logic in the sense that if a ecg can show that you have had a heart attack there must be "signs" leading up to it . I only got about a 5 maybe 10 minute warning that not all was well in Happy Land!

Thanks for the expansive reply




Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

gnfb on trademe travelkit.nz

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  Reply # 1057753 1-Jun-2014 23:50
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yes an ecg can tell you if you're about to have a heart attack. that's why you have an exercise ecg to predict the risk of having one. but you will be wired for sound! and who's going to read 24/7 worth of data from you though?

edit: please don't listen to me - ask your heart specialist! he might want to read 24/7 worth of your ecg?!

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  Reply # 1057754 1-Jun-2014 23:53
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PS - don't forget the aspirin ... and hope like hell it stops the platelets holding hands!
edit - stops a critical mass of platelets holding hands
edit edit - seriously, don't worry too much. that's probably not going to help. hence they put you on an antistress thing called a beta blocker - hey the docs really don't fully understand this, they have some weapons, some data, take care my friend!

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  Reply # 1057774 2-Jun-2014 08:33
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DISCLAIMER: I AM NOT A DOCTOR.
http://www.alivecor.com/home is possibly more of what you are looking for, I would doubt that a fitness heart rate monitor week do what you ask.
DISCLAIMER: I AM NOT A DOCTOR AND DO NOT USE GEEKZONE FOR MEDICAL ADVICE.

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  Reply # 1057855 2-Jun-2014 11:43
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I doubt there is any device that will pickup the suttle changes required to do what you want.

ECG machines are very sensitive to motion artifact. Remember when you had your ECG how they asked you to lay still to " get a good trace ".
Also the sensors need to be replaced regularly to maintain a good trace which you would have to do after each shower.

The 24 monitors that hospitals give patients to take home are more to look at arythmias which are less affected by motion effects. Even then the data isn't looked at until you return it to hospital.

So the answer is probably no. 

A.


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  Reply # 1057963 2-Jun-2014 14:06
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great tool, yes.
"predicting a heart attack" with a degree of accuracy ... hmm ... even your ferrari/porsche/lambo cannot tell you if it's going to catch fire anytime soon ...



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  Reply # 1058844 3-Jun-2014 20:46
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joker97: PS - don't forget the aspirin ... and hope like hell it stops the platelets holding hands!
edit - stops a critical mass of platelets holding hands
edit edit - seriously, don't worry too much. that's probably not going to help. hence they put you on an antistress thing called a beta blocker - hey the docs really don't fully understand this, they have some weapons, some data, take care my friend!


Yes I actually do take a aspirin a day plus of course a fistful of other ones that do various things.

I would like to think that we are not far away from predictive hardware, I mean you can get a ecg in a iphone anything is possible.

I was however thinking of how we look to hi tec for answers when maybe we should also look at the obvious as well.

The same as when the yanks spent thousands developing a pen that wrote in space and the russians took a pencil.

I use to live thirty minutes form the hospital , I now live 10 minutes
simple stuff like that.




Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

gnfb on trademe travelkit.nz

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  Reply # 1059089 4-Jun-2014 10:14
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Try the link below.

I have one (Mio Alpha), due to having a heart problem. There is no need to wear a chest band as all the sensing is done at the wrist. The watch operates as a normal watch until you switch it to exercise mode which activates the HR monitor and you can then also switch the stopwatch on. The battery can be recharged by attaching a connection to your PC and is supposed to last for abour 8 hours when using the exercise mode. Normal watch usage lasts for months (lots).

The watch will transmit exercise details to a phone or tablet (Android 4.3 and above?) and will dispolay the last set of exercise results on the watch (in-zone or out-of-zone exercise levels, with sounding tones).

I only use the HR monitoring when my ticker begins to play up. This permits me to keep an eye on things and aware of when things begin to get a little out of hand.

I also use it to time (stopwatch) my exercise sessions, but while in this mode, I also get the constant HR reading on the watch. As I don't have a suitable phone or tablet, I haven't used the data transmission facility.

http://www.mioglobal.com/uk/Shop/Department.aspx?DeptID=1&lang=EN-UK&pricecat=4&gclid=CMzHrvvY3r4CFcIJvAodxmMA9w



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  Reply # 1059249 4-Jun-2014 17:15
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Still on topic but off on a tangent. A while back I thought I'd try to do a 10km run with the aim of completing it without a coronary. So on Sunday I made it in the Christchurch Airport race and obviously didn't get carted off.

 

 

I use Nike+ (and the android app with GPS) to log run data but now thinking of adding heart rate data to the mix. Any thoughts on a useful bit of kit?

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  Reply # 1059261 4-Jun-2014 17:52
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How about something like this:

http://www.vigilmonitoring.com/

http://www.vigilmonitoring.com/?q=news/vigil-wins-nz-hi-tech-pre-commericalisation-award

"Vigil Monitoring celebrated success in the New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards held in Christchurch on 16 May. Winners of the Callahan Innovation Hi-Tech Pre-Commercialisation Company of the Year 2014, this award recognises the potential of a hi-tech company that is a new venture with a clearly identified competitive advantage.

 

Vigil offers an intelligent medical alarm using a bracelet and base station that will raise an alarm automatically if an adverse event such as a fall or change in heart rate is detected. Smart technologies such as this will enable more effective methods of medical monitoring."




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