Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
 
 
 

Affiliate link: Security and privacy with NordVPN.

gzt

gzt
11645 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1078508 2-Jul-2014 11:01
Send private message

Batwing:
gzt:
KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.

Yeah I think a lot of this objection to accent is a bit snobbish really.

Accents are fine, but getting letters the wrong way round is surely a step too far?

It's just another word form. You can find it in english literature. Chaucer for example. This exact form is still in use in some regional accents of the UK.

tchart
1677 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1078523 2-Jul-2014 11:28
Send private message

Digmarx: Some of my relatives & friends back home consider the Kiwi accent cute.


I was in Canada a few weeks back and the checkout operators at a few stores I visited thought it was cute too.

 
 
 
 


Batwing
564 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1078537 2-Jul-2014 11:52
Send private message

gzt:
Batwing:
gzt:
KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.

Yeah I think a lot of this objection to accent is a bit snobbish really.

Accents are fine, but getting letters the wrong way round is surely a step too far?

It's just another word form. You can find it in english literature. Chaucer for example. This exact form is still in use in some regional accents of the UK.

 

Chaucer existed on the cusp of standardisation of English and used accent as a comedic device, I wonder if his works are too early to use as a marker - especially for our local dialect. I'd still lean towards people getting ask/aks garbled as poor command of the language and prefer not to give it blind acceptance simply because it can be understood. Those here in New Zealand that are saying aks probably aren't giving a nod to their Kentish roots, it's more likely a coincidence that their mistake resembles a correct regional pronunciation back in Englaland.

dclegg
2743 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1078543 2-Jul-2014 12:01
Send private message

I contract full-time to a US based company. At times I've had to slow down my natural speaking pace so they can understand me.

Azzura
454 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1078546 2-Jul-2014 12:12
Send private message

As a Canadian living in NZ ----- This pretty much sums it up.  But apparently when I say about. I am told it sounds like i am saying a boat.

 


jonathan18
4737 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1078552 2-Jul-2014 12:19
Send private message

Batwing: Chaucer existed on the cusp of standardisation of English and used accent as a comedic device, I wonder if his works are too early to use as a marker - especially for our local dialect. I'd still lean towards people getting ask/aks garbled as poor command of the language and prefer not to give it blind acceptance simply because it can be understood. Those here in New Zealand that are saying aks probably aren't giving a nod to their Kentish roots, it's more likely a coincidence that their mistake resembles a correct regional pronunciation back in Englaland.


I'd buy this argument.

There is also, in the example I gave above, the reality that not everyone is so even-handed as apparently KiwiNZ is, and will indeed judge the speaker in a negative light, and probably be less likely to take what they seriously (I guess it could be audience-dependent: a group of people more likely to speak in the same way may find it easier to relate?).

To me, this is part of doing your job professionally - most of us automatically tailor our lanuage (and indeed accent) depending on the circumstances. In this situation (a workplace setting, working with professionals and representing your employer) I'd expect a different style of communication than talking to one's mates at the pub!

KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.


This could be taken to be fairly sanctimonious! But, in all seriousness, do you apply this to the written word as well?


jonathan18
4737 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1078554 2-Jul-2014 12:22
Send private message

Azzura: As a Canadian living in NZ ----- This pretty much sums it up.  But apparently when I say about. I am told it sounds like i am saying a boat.

 

 

 



Aboat / about is a classic, and one of the few clearly obvious differences I can pick a Candian. And as for how Canadians pronounce the city of Regina - this used to provide me with endless giggles (TBH, it still cracks me up!).

 
 
 
 


Batman
Mad Scientist
22934 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1078555 2-Jul-2014 12:26
Send private message

gehenna: Live overseas for a while and then come home and see how it sounds.  It took me a while to get used to it again after living in Oz for a few years.  Ads on the radio and TV shows are particularly noticeable.


+1

it is made fun of in every overseas country that speaks English :D (that i've been to)




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


gzt

gzt
11645 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1078556 2-Jul-2014 12:26
Send private message

Batwing:
gzt:
Batwing:
gzt:
KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.

Yeah I think a lot of this objection to accent is a bit snobbish really.

Accents are fine, but getting letters the wrong way round is surely a step too far?

It's just another word form. You can find it in english literature. Chaucer for example. This exact form is still in use in some regional accents of the UK.

Chaucer existed on the cusp of standardisation of English and used accent as a comedic device, I wonder if his works are too early to use as a marker - especially for our local dialect. I'd still lean towards people getting ask/aks garbled as poor command of the language and prefer not to give it blind acceptance simply because it can be understood. Those here in New Zealand that are saying aks probably aren't giving a nod to their Kentish roots, it's more likely a coincidence that their mistake resembles a correct regional pronunciation back in Englaland.

I chose the earliest example. There is no shortage of later examples. It is a common form and has been in continuous use for a long time.

Azzura
454 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #1078562 2-Jul-2014 12:36
Send private message

The longer I am here, the less and less I notice the Kiwi accent. Sounds more and more like Canadian to my ear (weird). But some words or phrases, and the way sentences are put together. I might have to ask again what was said. Another odd thing is, I notice a Canadian or American accent less often when I run into one. It isn't until a little ways into a conversation I notice....hey that's not a Kiwi accent. Another weird thing...when I visited Canada in Nov 2013, my m8's were saying I had a Kiwi accent (but I think they were perhaps kidding?).

Having little or no experience in hearing the Aussie accent. I still find it difficult to differentiate between the Kiwi and Aussie accents. I can kinda tell...but no very confident in determining yes or no between the 2. 

My fav from back home is the way Newfoundlanders talk -

MikeB4
15555 posts

Uber Geek
Inactive user


  #1078570 2-Jul-2014 12:42
Send private message

jonathan18:
Batwing: Chaucer existed on the cusp of standardisation of English and used accent as a comedic device, I wonder if his works are too early to use as a marker - especially for our local dialect. I'd still lean towards people getting ask/aks garbled as poor command of the language and prefer not to give it blind acceptance simply because it can be understood. Those here in New Zealand that are saying aks probably aren't giving a nod to their Kentish roots, it's more likely a coincidence that their mistake resembles a correct regional pronunciation back in Englaland.


I'd buy this argument.

There is also, in the example I gave above, the reality that not everyone is so even-handed as apparently KiwiNZ is, and will indeed judge the speaker in a negative light, and probably be less likely to take what they seriously (I guess it could be audience-dependent: a group of people more likely to speak in the same way may find it easier to relate?).

To me, this is part of doing your job professionally - most of us automatically tailor our lanuage (and indeed accent) depending on the circumstances. In this situation (a workplace setting, working with professionals and representing your employer) I'd expect a different style of communication than talking to one's mates at the pub!

KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.


This could be taken to be fairly sanctimonious! But, in all seriousness, do you apply this to the written word as well?



Yes I do, it is not my role to correct people and again I was taught that it was rude to do so. 

Batwing
564 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1078574 2-Jul-2014 12:45
Send private message

gzt:
Batwing:
gzt:
Batwing:
gzt:
KiwiNZ: I was taught to listen to the meaning and not to listen to the how.

Yeah I think a lot of this objection to accent is a bit snobbish really.

Accents are fine, but getting letters the wrong way round is surely a step too far?

It's just another word form. You can find it in english literature. Chaucer for example. This exact form is still in use in some regional accents of the UK.

Chaucer existed on the cusp of standardisation of English and used accent as a comedic device, I wonder if his works are too early to use as a marker - especially for our local dialect. I'd still lean towards people getting ask/aks garbled as poor command of the language and prefer not to give it blind acceptance simply because it can be understood. Those here in New Zealand that are saying aks probably aren't giving a nod to their Kentish roots, it's more likely a coincidence that their mistake resembles a correct regional pronunciation back in Englaland.

I chose the earliest example. There is no shortage of later examples. It is a common form and has been in continuous use for a long time.

 


Convergent evolution perhaps? I find it difficult to see the line of continuity that stretches from England to a local demographic that uses the less common word form. As interesting as this is, I lack anything else useful to contribute. Both forms are valid, but I am suggesting that here in New Zealand that those using aks have arrived there by accident - which makes it lesss right, to a certain degree.

gzt

gzt
11645 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1078578 2-Jul-2014 13:05
Send private message

You appear to have formed this opinion without any evidence or research. I suggest you consider the very strong possibility you might be very wrong about this.

Batwing
564 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1078598 2-Jul-2014 13:17
Send private message

gzt: You appear to have formed this opinion without any evidence or research. I suggest you consider the very strong possibility you might be very wrong about this.
Verily, it appears we're both just throwing out theories, so no suggestion needed :)

solival
160 posts

Master Geek


  #1078603 2-Jul-2014 13:33
Send private message

Kiwi accent not that bad. Scotish accent much harder to understand, really. But yes, it's quite specific.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Slingshot offering ugly-modem to help reduce e-waste in New Zealand
Posted 30-Sep-2020 16:01


AWS launches new edge location in New Zealand
Posted 30-Sep-2020 15:35


Amazon introduces new Echo devices
Posted 25-Sep-2020 11:56


Mad Catz introduces new S.T.R.I.K.E. 13 Mechanical Gaming Keyboard
Posted 25-Sep-2020 11:34


Vodafone NZ upgrades international submarine network
Posted 25-Sep-2020 09:09


Jabra announces wireless noise-cancelling airbuds, upgrade existing model
Posted 24-Sep-2020 14:43


Nokia 3.4 to be available in New Zealand
Posted 24-Sep-2020 14:34


HP announces new HP ENVY laptops aimed at content creators
Posted 24-Sep-2020 14:02


Logitech introduce MX Anywhere 3
Posted 21-Sep-2020 21:17


Countdown unveils contactless shopping with new Scan&Go tech
Posted 21-Sep-2020 09:48


HP unveils new innovations for businesses adapting to rapidly evolving workstyles and workforces
Posted 17-Sep-2020 15:36


GoPro launches new HERO9 Black camera
Posted 17-Sep-2020 09:45


Telecommunications industry launches new 5G Facts website
Posted 17-Sep-2020 07:56


New Zealand ranks 3rd in world in GSMA index
Posted 15-Sep-2020 10:13


Trend Micro Security Suite adds web monitoring to prevent identity theft
Posted 14-Sep-2020 15:37



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.