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  Reply # 1129473 15-Sep-2014 21:38
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RickD:
SaltyNZ: Which is why he was attacked this way first: he's so easy to hate. But if you think about what he is *really* accused of - which boils down to 'provided online storage where other people could put infringing content' - then this is a whole lot more dangerous. People can share infringing content via Dropbox or any of the other cloud services too. What would happen if Dropbox - or Google, or Microsoft - was first in line for this type of attack? People would be jumping up and down so hard the politicians would be falling all over themselves to give them amnesty. 

But KDC ... well, he's so easy to hate. Go after him first, and most people will have your attitude: he's a crook, he got what he deserved, good riddance. And then the precedent is set, and everyone else is now in the firing line to pay protection money to rightsholders. 'Shame about that Dotcom guy, innit gov? Say, nice cloud service you got here. Quite safe is it? Things *break* you know.'

And that's why you should fight for KDC even if you dislike him personally.


The difference is, the internet isn't covered in links to pirated content on Dropbox or Google Drive, everybody knew Megaupload was a place to for pirated content and the links were everywhere. The site administrators knew that and made a lot of money because of it. If Dotcom is innocent, he should have no problem proving it in a US court.


If you read some of the original court documents that were available not long after the raid there are apparently emails proving that Dotcom and the others involved actively encouraged piracy by paying those that had uploaded copyrighted material. The more downloads of that material the more they got paid.

Some seem to make out Dotcom as some innocent fella just providing online storage but that is far from the truth.

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  Reply # 1129482 15-Sep-2014 21:52
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hio77:
RickD:
SaltyNZ: Which is why he was attacked this way first: he's so easy to hate. But if you think about what he is *really* accused of - which boils down to 'provided online storage where other people could put infringing content' - then this is a whole lot more dangerous. People can share infringing content via Dropbox or any of the other cloud services too. What would happen if Dropbox - or Google, or Microsoft - was first in line for this type of attack? People would be jumping up and down so hard the politicians would be falling all over themselves to give them amnesty. 

But KDC ... well, he's so easy to hate. Go after him first, and most people will have your attitude: he's a crook, he got what he deserved, good riddance. And then the precedent is set, and everyone else is now in the firing line to pay protection money to rightsholders. 'Shame about that Dotcom guy, innit gov? Say, nice cloud service you got here. Quite safe is it? Things *break* you know.'

And that's why you should fight for KDC even if you dislike him personally.


The difference is, the internet isn't covered in links to pirated content on Dropbox or Google Drive, everybody knew Megaupload was a place to for pirated content and the links were everywhere. The site administrators knew that and made a lot of money because of it. If Dotcom is innocent, he should have no problem proving it in a US court.


take Rapidshare as an example then.


It was used a lot more than megaupload at one point, and is still a very long standing alternative.


Plenty of links posted around the internet with pirated content.


And what did RapidShare do after the Megaupload raid? Changed their business model...

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1129497 15-Sep-2014 22:10
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marmel:
RickD:
SaltyNZ: Which is why he was attacked this way first: he's so easy to hate. But if you think about what he is *really* accused of - which boils down to 'provided online storage where other people could put infringing content' - then this is a whole lot more dangerous. People can share infringing content via Dropbox or any of the other cloud services too. What would happen if Dropbox - or Google, or Microsoft - was first in line for this type of attack? People would be jumping up and down so hard the politicians would be falling all over themselves to give them amnesty. 

But KDC ... well, he's so easy to hate. Go after him first, and most people will have your attitude: he's a crook, he got what he deserved, good riddance. And then the precedent is set, and everyone else is now in the firing line to pay protection money to rightsholders. 'Shame about that Dotcom guy, innit gov? Say, nice cloud service you got here. Quite safe is it? Things *break* you know.'

And that's why you should fight for KDC even if you dislike him personally.


The difference is, the internet isn't covered in links to pirated content on Dropbox or Google Drive, everybody knew Megaupload was a place to for pirated content and the links were everywhere. The site administrators knew that and made a lot of money because of it. If Dotcom is innocent, he should have no problem proving it in a US court.


If you read some of the original court documents that were available not long after the raid there are apparently emails proving that Dotcom and the others involved actively encouraged piracy by paying those that had uploaded copyrighted material. The more downloads of that material the more they got paid.

Some seem to make out Dotcom as some innocent fella just providing online storage but that is far from the truth.


Except they only got paid if their popular file was under 100mb.

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  Reply # 1129501 15-Sep-2014 22:19
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Yabanize:
marmel:
RickD:
SaltyNZ: Which is why he was attacked this way first: he's so easy to hate. But if you think about what he is *really* accused of - which boils down to 'provided online storage where other people could put infringing content' - then this is a whole lot more dangerous. People can share infringing content via Dropbox or any of the other cloud services too. What would happen if Dropbox - or Google, or Microsoft - was first in line for this type of attack? People would be jumping up and down so hard the politicians would be falling all over themselves to give them amnesty. 

But KDC ... well, he's so easy to hate. Go after him first, and most people will have your attitude: he's a crook, he got what he deserved, good riddance. And then the precedent is set, and everyone else is now in the firing line to pay protection money to rightsholders. 'Shame about that Dotcom guy, innit gov? Say, nice cloud service you got here. Quite safe is it? Things *break* you know.'

And that's why you should fight for KDC even if you dislike him personally.


The difference is, the internet isn't covered in links to pirated content on Dropbox or Google Drive, everybody knew Megaupload was a place to for pirated content and the links were everywhere. The site administrators knew that and made a lot of money because of it. If Dotcom is innocent, he should have no problem proving it in a US court.


If you read some of the original court documents that were available not long after the raid there are apparently emails proving that Dotcom and the others involved actively encouraged piracy by paying those that had uploaded copyrighted material. The more downloads of that material the more they got paid.

Some seem to make out Dotcom as some innocent fella just providing online storage but that is far from the truth.


Except they only got paid if their popular file was under 100mb.


That's why scene releases broken into multiple RAR files suited Megaupload users perfectly.

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  Reply # 1129835 16-Sep-2014 12:38
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Let's just vote in Black Power!




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  Reply # 1130450 17-Sep-2014 09:14
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Always be yourself, unless you can be Batman, then always be the Batman



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  Reply # 1130462 17-Sep-2014 09:40
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Online petitions? Slacktivism... Unless a government commits to having a petition platform and answering petitions that reach a certain threshold, these are mostly ignored, except by media who just wants a "this [post|petition|video] reached viral status!" attention grabbing headline




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  Reply # 1130474 17-Sep-2014 10:07
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freitasm: Online petitions? Slacktivism... Unless a government commits to having a petition platform and answering petitions that reach a certain threshold, these are mostly ignored, except by media who just wants a "this [post|petition|video] reached viral status!" attention grabbing headline


Attention grabbing? In this day and age of great gravitas and statesmanship? Surely not.





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  Reply # 1130498 17-Sep-2014 10:34
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freitasm: Online petitions? Slacktivism... Unless a government commits to having a petition platform and answering petitions that reach a certain threshold, these are mostly ignored, except by media who just wants a "this [post|petition|video] reached viral status!" attention grabbing headline


True but you get a warm fuzzy feeling when you fill it out.

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  Reply # 1130584 17-Sep-2014 12:11
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marmel: 
True but you get a warm fuzzy feeling when you fill it out.


Kind of like peeing in a wetsuit. But not quite as useful.




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These comments are my own and do not represent the opinions of 2degrees.


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  Reply # 1130592 17-Sep-2014 12:21

Let's start a fund. I'll donate the first $1000, how much would a couple of thugs and a small boat cost to hire?

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  Reply # 1130610 17-Sep-2014 12:42
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I bookmarked this page earlier this year:
http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/polls/9708696/Dotcom-We-ll-pull-out-if-unpopular

It comes as Labour leader David Cunliffe and his Green Party counterpart Russel Norman have said they could overrule a potential court order extraditing Dotcom to the United States."

If a court ruling can be so easily overruled, I don't think an online petition has any hope.

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  Reply # 1130614 17-Sep-2014 12:46
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SteveON: Let's start a fund. I'll donate the first $1000, how much would a couple of thugs and a small boat cost to hire?


Everyone else just chip in the money you've saved "downloading" stuff then you'll be less hypocritical.

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  Reply # 1130769 17-Sep-2014 15:26
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  Reply # 1130945 17-Sep-2014 19:28
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RickD:
Yabanize:
marmel:
RickD:
SaltyNZ: Which is why he was attacked this way first: he's so easy to hate. But if you think about what he is *really* accused of - which boils down to 'provided online storage where other people could put infringing content' - then this is a whole lot more dangerous. People can share infringing content via Dropbox or any of the other cloud services too. What would happen if Dropbox - or Google, or Microsoft - was first in line for this type of attack? People would be jumping up and down so hard the politicians would be falling all over themselves to give them amnesty. 

But KDC ... well, he's so easy to hate. Go after him first, and most people will have your attitude: he's a crook, he got what he deserved, good riddance. And then the precedent is set, and everyone else is now in the firing line to pay protection money to rightsholders. 'Shame about that Dotcom guy, innit gov? Say, nice cloud service you got here. Quite safe is it? Things *break* you know.'

And that's why you should fight for KDC even if you dislike him personally.


The difference is, the internet isn't covered in links to pirated content on Dropbox or Google Drive, everybody knew Megaupload was a place to for pirated content and the links were everywhere. The site administrators knew that and made a lot of money because of it. If Dotcom is innocent, he should have no problem proving it in a US court.


If you read some of the original court documents that were available not long after the raid there are apparently emails proving that Dotcom and the others involved actively encouraged piracy by paying those that had uploaded copyrighted material. The more downloads of that material the more they got paid.

Some seem to make out Dotcom as some innocent fella just providing online storage but that is far from the truth.


Except they only got paid if their popular file was under 100mb.




That's why scene releases broken into multiple RAR files suited Megaupload users perfectly.


Well thats hardly megauploads fault is it, They did something to try and stop it.

Not to mention their takedown tool which all of the movie studios in the MPAA had access to, which other sites didnt have.

If people wanted to pirate a movie it would be alot easier just to find a torrent where its all in one file.

People use dropbox and google drive for the same thing.

Maybe they should just ban the sale of hard drives since so many people have hard drives full of movies

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