Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
8033 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 390

Trusted

  # 1347821 20-Jul-2015 16:30
Send private message

Paul1977: Yeah, Semi-Soft is still hard as a rock. ButterSoft much better. This why I just don't understand still producing it.


If there's demand for both why not... I mean that's like asking why make hard, medium and soft toothbrushes!

14877 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2017


  # 1347824 20-Jul-2015 16:34
Send private message

Geektastic:
robjg63:
Geektastic:
lchiu7:
scuwp: Go Olivio. Last supposedly Anchor spreadable butter we brought, wasn't


That's what we use since I tried to go vegan for a while. For most purposes it's just as good as butter and it spreads easily.

For baking I think my wife uses butter but for spreads, sauces etc. Olivio is fine.


Olivio is fine if you like the taste of olive oil..!


I would suggest you have never eaten an olive or tried actual olive oil.


In which case you would be oh so very wrong.

For a start I own an olive grove with 1200 trees on it...!


How did your trees perform this year? I have a family member who has a grove in the wairarapa and their trees produced very few olives this year, and seems to be problem around NZ.

 
 
 
 


12867 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4305

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1347839 20-Jul-2015 17:28
Send private message

mattwnz:
Geektastic:
robjg63:
Geektastic:
lchiu7:
scuwp: Go Olivio. Last supposedly Anchor spreadable butter we brought, wasn't


That's what we use since I tried to go vegan for a while. For most purposes it's just as good as butter and it spreads easily.

For baking I think my wife uses butter but for spreads, sauces etc. Olivio is fine.


Olivio is fine if you like the taste of olive oil..!


I would suggest you have never eaten an olive or tried actual olive oil.


In which case you would be oh so very wrong.

For a start I own an olive grove with 1200 trees on it...!


How did your trees perform this year? I have a family member who has a grove in the wairarapa and their trees produced very few olives this year, and seems to be problem around NZ.


Similar story. In fact, I have contractors pruning now - we are not even bothering to pick this year.





895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185


  # 1348450 21-Jul-2015 17:21
Send private message

scuwp: Go Olivio. Last supposedly Anchor spreadable butter we brought, wasn't


Curious as to why you recommend Olivio. Olive oil is very healthy but hydrogenated (the process to make liquid oil in to a solid substance) oil is terrible for the body. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/trans-fat/art-20046114



379 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 30

Trusted

  # 1349532 21-Jul-2015 21:30
One person supports this post
Send private message

Kiwifruta:

Curious as to why you recommend Olivio. Olive oil is very healthy but hydrogenated (the process to make liquid oil in to a solid substance) oil is terrible for the body. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/trans-fat/art-20046114




The amount of trans fatty acids in modern margarine is about 60 mg per serving. Anything over 500 mg per serving is not good, so this is around eight times lower. Older margarines were made by the hydrogenation process that created trans fatty acids. This is no longer the case in NZ or Australia, but I suspect it might be in the US. You can safely eat NZ margarine. My preference is butter, for the taste and several other health-related reasons.

I attended a very entertaining talk on plant-based oils at the NZ Institute of Food Science and Technology conference earlier this month, and the speaker told us how NZ manufacturers used to try to get the highest possible amount of trans fatty acids in margarine back in the 1970s. Thankfully this is no longer the case.

DrCheese (and other dairy products)





8270 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4556


  # 1349587 21-Jul-2015 22:59
Send private message

DrCheese:
Kiwifruta:

Curious as to why you recommend Olivio. Olive oil is very healthy but hydrogenated (the process to make liquid oil in to a solid substance) oil is terrible for the body. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/trans-fat/art-20046114




The amount of trans fatty acids in modern margarine is about 60 mg per serving. Anything over 500 mg per serving is not good, so this is around eight times lower. Older margarines were made by the hydrogenation process that created trans fatty acids. This is no longer the case in NZ or Australia, but I suspect it might be in the US. You can safely eat NZ margarine. My preference is butter, for the taste and several other health-related reasons.

I attended a very entertaining talk on plant-based oils at the NZ Institute of Food Science and Technology conference earlier this month, and the speaker told us how NZ manufacturers used to try to get the highest possible amount of trans fatty acids in margarine back in the 1970s. Thankfully this is no longer the case.

DrCheese (and other dairy products)


It's not quite that simple...

Standard "serving size" on labels for margarine is 10g, but 5g for butter in NZ.  (Why FFS ?????)
5g of *butter will contain ~ 200 mg trans fats, so at equivalent serving size as margarine, then that's 400 mg.

Trans fats (artificial) are produced by partial hydrogenation, so the raw material, process conditions etc affect levels of trans fats in the final product - a fully hydrogenated fat contains no trans fats.  AFAIK NZ margarine has never used the partial hydrogenation process as was used in the US.  I'm guessing that "Olivio" and canola based spreads (canola has very similar fatty acid composition to olive oil) will not be hydrogenated olive/canola oils, but unaltered oils blended with fully saturated fats (and other ingredients).  Those fully saturated fats may be hydrogenated (fully - to ensure low trans fats) or natural vegetable fats (possibly fractionated).

* butter trans fat content varies a lot - as does % trans fats in body fats of ruminants.  The bad news is that grass-fed ruminants tend to have higher levels of trans fats than grain fed - in milk and meat (shhh - "grass-fed" is a good marketing slogan).  The good news is that some/most of that increase of trans fats is "CLA" (conjugated linoleic acid) fats - which some people claim is "healthy" (is it? hard evidence is zero)  Human breast milk also has large variance in trans fat content, IIRC from 1 to 4% of total fats - and no surprise that low levels are found in Asia, high in North America etc.

Correlations between diet and incidence of CHD etc smack you in the face, but that's not going to be so simple either. 



379 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 30

Trusted

  # 1349588 21-Jul-2015 23:15
Send private message

I don't believe that is correct. Partial hydrogenation was used n the 1970s in NZ.

Serving sizes vary. Some butters are 10 g (Lewis Road Creamery, for example) whereas others are 5 g. I prefer to use percentages but most folks get confused, hence my use of serving sizes.

There are plenty of other components in butter that have some evidence for health-related benefits, such as sphingomyelin. This isn't present in margarine. It's an area of research interest to me. The evidence for CLA efficacy is probably a bit higher than "zero".

By the way, you sound like you know what you are talking about. Do you work in dairy research?

DrCheese.





 
 
 
 


14877 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2017


  # 1349589 21-Jul-2015 23:17
Send private message

Kiwifruta:
scuwp: Go Olivio. Last supposedly Anchor spreadable butter we brought, wasn't


Curious as to why you recommend Olivio. Olive oil is very healthy but hydrogenated (the process to make liquid oil in to a solid substance) oil is terrible for the body. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/trans-fat/art-20046114




How much olive oil does it have in it anyway? If you look at the ingredients, it is a blend of canola oil, palm fruit oil, olive oil. Being third on the list, it may not contain much at all? as it doesn't list the percentages.

8270 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4556


  # 1349592 21-Jul-2015 23:29
Send private message

I'm reasonably confident that partial hydrogenation wasn't ever used for production of retail margarine in NZ - even in the '70s.  For shortening / bakery ingredients - quite possible I expect.
AFAIK, the only evidence for health benefit of CLA is from some studies in diabetic rats.  I call that as zero WRT human diet and disease - a starting point, perhaps.
No - I don't work in the dairy industry - just passing interest / curiosity, background in industrial chemistry.

379 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 30

Trusted

  # 1349595 21-Jul-2015 23:41
Send private message

Fred99: AFAIK, the only evidence for health benefit of CLA is from some studies in diabetic rats.  I call that as zero WRT human diet and disease - a starting point, perhaps.


Really? I just did a quick search on "CLA human health trials" in a scientific database of research papers and came up with 72 hits. Where did you get your information from?

DrCheese.





8270 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4556


  # 1349600 22-Jul-2015 00:11
Send private message

DrCheese:
Fred99: AFAIK, the only evidence for health benefit of CLA is from some studies in diabetic rats.  I call that as zero WRT human diet and disease - a starting point, perhaps.


Really? I just did a quick search on "CLA human health trials" in a scientific database of research papers and came up with 72 hits. Where did you get your information from?

DrCheese.


Let's knock 18/72 on the head in one hit.  Meta analysis of 18 clinical trials, first hit, but lets start at the conclusion:

"Given at a dose of 3.2 g/d, CLA produces a modest loss in body fat in humans"

That's 3.2 g/d of CLA as a supplement, approximate equivalent to CLA content of 900 grams of butter.

Now the data:

CLA was effective and produced a reduction in fat mass for the CLA group alone (0.05 +/- 0.05 kg/wk; P<0.001) and for the CLA group compared with placebo (0.09 +/- 0.08 kg/wk; P<0.001)

I can't even start to explain how underwhelmed I feel by that.  Yes - I'm a skeptic - and for now I'll stick with a rat trial that might have shown something.

Care to guess what the result of that meta analysis may have been if they'd been feeding the subjects a couple of tubs of butter a day? 





895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185


  # 1349670 22-Jul-2015 09:22
Send private message

Because this is a predominately tech website, I expected little knowledge about nutrition to be shared on this website.  How wrong was I!!

The crossfitters are all 'gung ho' about grass fed butter and grass fed beef. But the above comments appear to differ.

By the way the best health blog I follow is by a biology researcher in the States. His research is on gut flora and autoimmune disorders.
http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.co.nz/2008/09/anti-inflammatory-diet.html
http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.co.nz/search?q=health+diagram
http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.co.nz/2012/06/dr-oz-on-gut-flora-repair.html
http://coolinginflammation.blogspot.co.nz/search?q=canola+oil

Also worth viewing are TED talks by Rob McKnight, a Kiwi researcher based in the States.




14788 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2751

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1349714 22-Jul-2015 10:42
Send private message

Kiwirfruta, your links aren't quite right - when you click them most take you to the same page. Copy and paste of your links works, it's just a formatting issue.

895 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 185


379 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 30

Trusted

# 1349779 22-Jul-2015 13:28
Send private message

Fred99: I'm reasonably confident that partial hydrogenation wasn't ever used for production of retail margarine in NZ - even in the '70s.  For shortening / bakery ingredients - quite possible I expect.
AFAIK, the only evidence for health benefit of CLA is from some studies in diabetic rats.  I call that as zero WRT human diet and disease - a starting point, perhaps.
No - I don't work in the dairy industry - just passing interest / curiosity, background in industrial chemistry.


This is not quite right either. Margarine was made using a partial hydrogenation process for 30 years from the early 1970s in NZ. The process now uses blending of higher melting point plant-based oils. This is from the horse's mouth --- a scientist who worked in the margarine industry in NZ for the last 43 years.

Best not to prefix anything with "AFAIK" if you are trying to make an authoritative statement. It sends mixed messages to the reader.

DrCheese.





1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
Filter this topic showing only the reply marked as answer View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Air New Zealand uses drones to inspect aircraft
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:39


TCL Electronics launches its first-ever 8K TV
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:18


E-scooter share scheme launches in Wellington
Posted 17-Jun-2019 12:34


Anyone can broadcast with Kordia Pop Up TV
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:51


Volvo and Uber present production vehicle ready for self-driving
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:47


100,000 customers connected to fibre broadband network through Enable
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:35


5G uptake even faster than expected
Posted 12-Jun-2019 10:01


Xbox showcases 60 anticipated games
Posted 10-Jun-2019 20:24


Trend Micro Turns Public Hotspots into Secure Networks with WiFi Protection for Mobile Devices
Posted 5-Jun-2019 13:24


Bold UK spinoff for beauty software company Flossie
Posted 2-Jun-2019 14:10


Amazon Introduces Echo Show 5
Posted 1-Jun-2019 15:32


Epson launches new 4K Pro-UHD projector technology
Posted 1-Jun-2019 15:26


Lenovo and Qualcomm unveil first 5G PC called Project Limitless
Posted 28-May-2019 20:23


Intel introduces new 10th Gen Intel Core Processors and Project Athena
Posted 28-May-2019 19:28


Orcon first to trial residential 10Gbps broadband
Posted 28-May-2019 11:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.