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229 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1407794 16-Oct-2015 12:13
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grant_k: IMO, the recent trend of starting every sentence with 'So' sounds just as retarded.  It is totally superfluous as evidenced by the title of another thread posted this morning:

So, got my Nexus 6 today..


I'd take that and 'there...' any day over "look,....' that gives me rage.




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  Reply # 1407797 16-Oct-2015 12:16
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fizzychicken:
grant_k: IMO, the recent trend of starting every sentence with 'So' sounds just as retarded.  It is totally superfluous as evidenced by the title of another thread posted this morning:

So, got my Nexus 6 today..


I'd take that and 'there...' any day over "look,....' that gives me rage.


Now,...

Now, actually...




Matthew


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1407799 16-Oct-2015 12:18
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Going forward....  ahhh, kill me now!




Matthew


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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1407804 16-Oct-2015 12:21
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also girls saying 'like', I swear the missus' sister once said 'like' in a sentence more times than all other words combined.....blew me away..."I was like, she's like she didnt like care, so i was like, like, like yeah".  wtf.




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Uber Geek
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  Reply # 1407805 16-Oct-2015 12:22
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MikeAqua: ... What about like and literally ...

Like is supposed to be figurative/comparative but its use as literal. 

Literally is used as figurative.

[when describing green grass] "The grass is like, green" No.  The grass IS green.  If the grass was aquamarine, like would be valid, but still clangy.

"I literally died"  No, you didn't.  You are still alive and clearly speaking figuratively.  "I like, died" would be better, but still hideous.


Totally agree with you about the use of "literally" - it's quite amazing how many people do mis-use it, and many I hear doing so are well-educated and should know better!

That said, the OED made a change to its definition of 'literally' a few years' back, highlighting the debate as to whether their role is reflect usage or provide a 'standard':

It is a word that has been misused by so many that its definition has been changed – literally. The Oxford English Dictionary has revealed that it has included the erroneous use of the word ‘literally’ after the usage became popular. The dictionary states the definition as ‘in a literal way or sense’ but adds that, informally, it can be ‘used for emphasis rather than being actually true’ such as ‘we were literally killing ourselves laughing’. The definition was added in the September 2011 edition, but went unnoticed until this week.

Senior OED editor Fiona McPherson commented in jest: ‘It seems to have literally slipped under the radar.’ The move will be a relief to commentators and politicians who have been ridiculed for using the word incorrectly. Last year, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg described low-rate taxpayers as ‘literally living in a different galaxy’, while in 2007 cricketer Sir Ian Botham said batsmen surviving appeals for leg-before-wicket dismissals had been ‘getting away with murder, literally’. In 1876, Mark Twain used the word in this way in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.
He wrote: ‘And when the middle of the afternoon came, from being a poor poverty-stricken boy in the morning, Tom was literally rolling in wealth.’

However, the oldest documented incorrect use of the word is in 1769 when the author Frances Brooke wrote, in The History of Emily Montague: ‘He is a fortunate man to be introduced to such a party of fine women at his arrival; it is literally to feed among the lilies.’

Miss McPherson said: ‘Our job is to describe the language people are using. The only reason this sense is included is because people are using it in this way. ‘Words have changed their meaning ever since the first word was uttered. Meat used to mean all food but now its sense has narrowed.’

At least, when explaining how people incorrectly use it, the dictionary still seems to slightly scold the person delivering the wrong word.

It says: 'This use can lead to unintentional humorous effects (we were literally killing ourselves laughing) and is not acceptable in formal contexts, though it is widespread.' Not everyone has been impressed with the change in use over the word. 'My impression is that many people don't have any idea of what "literally" means — or used to mean,' Boston University psycholinguist Jean Berko Gleason told the Boston Globe, The Week reported in March.

But the OED prides itself on constantly looking out for new ways words can be interpreted.

In June the leading authority on the English language confirmed that the definition of the word 'marriage' will be changed now a law allowing same-sex couples to get married has been passed.
Language experts said the definition did not change overnight but they will monitor how the word marriage changes over the next year.

An Oxford University Press spokeswoman said: ‘We continually monitor the words in our dictionaries, paying particular to those words whose usage is shifting, so yes, this will happen with marriage.’

As it stands, OxfordDictionaries.com defines marriage as being a ‘formal union of a man and a woman, typically as recognised by law, by which they become husband and wife.’ In a reference, it says marriage could also be ‘(in some jurisdictions) a union between partners of the same sex’.

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2392586/Oxford-English-Dictionary-admits-used-wrong-sense-word-literally.html#ixzz3ogKVS1sH

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Master Geek
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  Reply # 1407806 16-Oct-2015 12:23
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mdooher: Going forward....  ahhh, kill me now!


recently had to do an online course over 8 weeks full of videos and the american guy would 'go ahead' and do something or tell you to 'go ahead' and do something all the time.
'let's go ahead and click the new button. here you will see that the flow has picked up your ID. Go ahead and view the full result. I'm just going to go ahead and expand the window so we can see the full payload"




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  Reply # 1407807 16-Oct-2015 12:24
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fizzychicken:
grant_k: IMO, the recent trend of starting every sentence with 'So' sounds just as retarded.  It is totally superfluous as evidenced by the title of another thread posted this morning:

So, got my Nexus 6 today..


I'd take that and 'there...' any day over "look,....' that gives me rage.


So clearly you can't listen to our estemed PM speak then? He often finds it hard to start a sentence that's not prefaced with "look"; many other politicians are the same, sadly.

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  Reply # 1407808 16-Oct-2015 12:26
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fizzychicken:
mdooher: Going forward....  ahhh, kill me now!


recently had to do an online course over 8 weeks full of videos and the american guy would 'go ahead' and do something or tell you to 'go ahead' and do something all the time.
'let's go ahead and click the new button. here you will see that the flow has picked up your ID. Go ahead and view the full result. I'm just going to go ahead and expand the window so we can see the full payload"


Oh yes, that Americanism really gets to me too.

"Ok, now what you'll do is go ahead and ...."  I swear I like literally like vomit every time I like hear it.




Matthew


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  Reply # 1407809 16-Oct-2015 12:27
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So, you must get annoyed a lot there, aye bro?

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  Reply # 1407811 16-Oct-2015 12:28
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Geektastic: 
Not solved: made worse! Inappropriate over-familiarity is not a Good Thing.


I don't consider bro an expression of familiarity - it has long since become a generic word, same as mate. Not suitable in a professional context yes, but not really having much meaning otherwise.

Now, if someone (other than my wife) calls me dear, love or anything else along those lines - THAT drives me up the wall.

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  Reply # 1407812 16-Oct-2015 12:29
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wasabi2k:
Geektastic: 
Not solved: made worse! Inappropriate over-familiarity is not a Good Thing.


I don't consider bro an expression of familiarity - it has long since become a generic word, same as mate. Not suitable in a professional context yes, but not really having much meaning otherwise.

Now, if someone (other than my wife) calls me dear, love or anything else along those lines - THAT drives me up the wall.


I live in Dunedin, I don't hear the work "bro" used in everyday conversation




Matthew


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  Reply # 1407814 16-Oct-2015 12:30
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grant_k: IMO, the recent trend of starting every sentence with 'So' sounds just as retarded.  It is totally superfluous as evidenced by the title of another thread posted this morning:

So, got my Nexus 6 today..


Got implies to me that it was unexpected.
Nicer would be phrases such as:
Received my Nexus 6 today
My new Nexus 6 arrived today.
Picked up a Nexus 6 today.
Look world, look at me, I own a Nexus 6 now.
Was gifted a Nexus 6
Purchased a Nexus 6 today.

Look I literally sht my pants I was so excited to get a new Nexus 6, so, like, there, there's that.

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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 1407815 16-Oct-2015 12:31
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wasabi2k: Now, if someone (other than my wife) calls me dear, love or anything else along those lines - THAT drives me up the wall.


There, there, dear.

229 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 1407817 16-Oct-2015 12:33
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jonathan18:
fizzychicken:
grant_k: IMO, the recent trend of starting every sentence with 'So' sounds just as retarded.  It is totally superfluous as evidenced by the title of another thread posted this morning:

So, got my Nexus 6 today..


I'd take that and 'there...' any day over "look,....' that gives me rage.


So clearly you can't listen to our estemed PM speak then? He often finds it hard to start a sentence that's not prefaced with "look"; many other politicians are the same, sadly.


I have to admit I have never really noticed anyone say it until I moved to NZ just over 5 years ago, now if someone is being interviewed on TV or a caller on the radio they all seem to start with 'aww look,....'. Crops up when sports people are interviewed post game too. Some of my colleagues at work do it all the time, I find myself interrupting with "look at what?" in the hope it gets them to stop....it never does.




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  Reply # 1407818 16-Oct-2015 12:33
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The scary thing is if this conversation was on Facebook it would be over the heads of 90% of users




Matthew


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