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  Reply # 1408995 19-Oct-2015 09:19
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linw: [cut] Then there are a couple of people here using defiantly instead of definitely. This is definitely irksome! [cut]


I've noticed this and find it equally irritiating, but my theory is this is a result of sloppy typing and auto correct software, rather than a fundamental confusion between the two words.

I'm a self-confessed pedant, and have been embarassed to glance over some of my posts and find some really obvious errors caused by auto-corrections... I imagine this is defiantly the same cause of the mistake you point out.

My favourite auto correct mistake was one my sister made in a recipe she typed out - based around eggplants, the title of the dish was Aborigine Stew!

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  Reply # 1409037 19-Oct-2015 09:35
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Bet she got into a bit of a stew when this was pointed out!!

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1409073 19-Oct-2015 10:48
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More of a pronunciation thing, but whenever there is a news story involving the police someone needs to tell the reporter that "Constable" is not spelled with a U.

Also, a cult is not a young male horse.

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  Reply # 1409081 19-Oct-2015 10:58
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We are continually told that language is evolving and that we should move with the times and allow newer pronunciations and grammar to flourish.


...except of course when it comes to pronunciation of Maori place names. I think it an offence worthy of dismissal if a newsreader dare pronounce a Maori place name the way the locals do.




Matthew


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  Reply # 1409085 19-Oct-2015 11:01
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Paul1977: More of a pronunciation thing, but whenever there is a news story involving the police someone needs to tell the reporter that "Constable" is not spelled with a U.

Also, a cult is not a young male horse.


Yeah, it may not be spelt with a "u", but is typically pronounced as if it did; I think this is still the standard pronunication in the UK. Sometimes this pronuncation does come in handy when the copper in question is acting like a...

Many will still pronounce "lieutenant" as "leftenant", again I understand a hangover from the UK pronunciation.

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  Reply # 1409320 19-Oct-2015 15:56
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Here's one straight from the Sky Fan pass website

"There’s no contracts..."





Matthew


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  Reply # 1409396 19-Oct-2015 17:33
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mdooher: I think it an offence worthy of dismissal if a newsreader dare pronounce a Maori place name the way the locals do.


Like locals calls Timaru Tim-a-roo, not te aaaaa ma ru, likewise Oamaru is om a roo, not o aaaaaa ma ru

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  Reply # 1409397 19-Oct-2015 17:38
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Imagine only being wrapped with leaves and spat on in Fiji when you break a leg in a village and not allowed to be taken to hospital.

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  Reply # 1409494 19-Oct-2015 21:17
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robjg63: ..."Aks" instead of ask - morons!...

This is interesting in regard to the earlier word acsian, and trying to determine which consonant order was the original form. I can't imagine current usage reflects continuity from a much earlier time though.

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  Reply # 1409495 19-Oct-2015 21:22
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jonathan18: ...

And then there's 'youse' as in 'youse guys' - that literally makes my blood boil.


It is easy to understand the requirement for a second-person plural personal pronoun, as ye has gone by the wayside. There are a number of forms in related languages that are pretty close to 'youse'.

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  Reply # 1409502 19-Oct-2015 21:53
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Why-tea-mar-tar Harbour

Why-tee-wear-re Beach

The pretentious Simon Dallow is the worst :)

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  Reply # 1409552 20-Oct-2015 05:21
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MikeAqua: Abuse of the term technically seems to be a more recent thing.

Technically was normally used occasionally to introduce a potentially counter-intuitive technical distinction. 

E.g "Technically, a slater is a more closely related to a shrimp than an insect"

Now it is used to attempt to lend weight to a non-technical (often subjective) argument.



What about like and literally ...

Like is supposed to be figurative/comparative but its use as literal. 

Literally is used as figurative.

[when describing green grass] "The grass is like, green" No.  The grass IS green.  If the grass was aquamarine, like would be valid, but still clangy.

"I literally died"  No, you didn't.  You are still alive and clearly speaking figuratively.  "I like, died" would be better, but still hideous.


Nicely put. I'll add to that, my bugbear, of your instead of you're.

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  Reply # 1409553 20-Oct-2015 05:31
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mdooher:
wasabi2k:
Geektastic: 
Not solved: made worse! Inappropriate over-familiarity is not a Good Thing.


I don't consider bro an expression of familiarity - it has long since become a generic word, same as mate. Not suitable in a professional context yes, but not really having much meaning otherwise.

Now, if someone (other than my wife) calls me dear, love or anything else along those lines - THAT drives me up the wall.


I live in Dunedin, I don't hear the work "bro" used in everyday conversation


Not enough polys in Dunedin to hear it as often. Here in the Waikato it's very common.

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  Reply # 1409554 20-Oct-2015 05:48
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oxnsox: I agree that being able to communicate ones thoughts is how we share and grow knowledge. But grammatical correctness doesn't add to that. The pedantry of grammatic precision serves egos and oinion polishers.

Language, and grammer, has evolved thru error and expressionism. ....and there are many languages most of which none of us understand.

Because we don't teach and learn the way we used to, does that make either solution more ideal?

I suggest that ultimately the outcome is more important than the precision of the method.


For me, poor grammar causes me to take more time to figure out what the writer's desired point is. Good grammar makes things more easily understood, poor grammar makes a sentence more difficult to understand.


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  Reply # 1409555 20-Oct-2015 06:11
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rhy7s:
jonathan18: ...

And then there's 'youse' as in 'youse guys' - that literally makes my blood boil.


It is easy to understand the requirement for a second-person plural personal pronoun, as ye has gone by the wayside. There are a number of forms in related languages that are pretty close to 'youse'.


Similarily, we, in English can be used to express 1st person plural and can both exclude and include the listener. Maori expresses these much more clearly with maua, matou, taua and tatou.


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