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MikeB4
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  #2137382 30-Nov-2018 16:58
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@Rikkitic If the ignition was off how did the fuel get delivered to the Carb? The fuel pump in the tank would not be working. Also it fuel was being delivered to the cylinders ignition would be difficult due to flooding and a mixture to rich for combuation. However I maybe wrong I am dragging stuff out of the grey matter from many moons ago.


MikeB4
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  #2137383 30-Nov-2018 16:59
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@mdooher I thought that was only if it were red it would go faster smile


Rikkitic
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  #2137396 30-Nov-2018 17:25
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MikeB4:

 

@Rikkitic If the ignition was off how did the fuel get delivered to the Carb? The fuel pump in the tank would not be working. Also it fuel was being delivered to the cylinders ignition would be difficult due to flooding and a mixture to rich for combuation. However I maybe wrong I am dragging stuff out of the grey matter from many moons ago.

 

 

You are wrong. My cars all had mechanical fuel pumps. From Wikipaedia: Prior to the widespread adoption of electronic fuel injection, most carbureted automobile engines used mechanical fuel pumps to transfer fuel from the fuel tank into the fuel bowls of the carburetor

 

2. How to start a car with flooded engine: roll it down a hill. Once it is moving at speed, kicking it into gear will cause it to cough, sputter and roar to life. As long as it is moving fast enough, flooding won't prevent it from igniting. If you are lucky, ignition will start with a big backfire, impressing the girls.

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


MikeB4
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  #2137403 30-Nov-2018 17:52
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@Rikkitic  that woud depend on the model of car. Many carburetor supplied vehicles had electric pumps at the tank. As for starting hmm you said he was travelling along a street, I assumed not a hill. To deliver enough fuel to cause a detonation that lifted the floor and removed the exhaust pipe would require a lot of fuel and an awfull lot of air. Starting  would seem to be a very old vehicle in those conditions would be very difficult if not impossible.  It sounds like "oh the tales some father tell their kids" kinda like the ones about the massive fish that always got away.


Rikkitic
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  #2137405 30-Nov-2018 18:04
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Sorry Mike you don't know what you are talking about. The car in question was from the 1930s, which is when my father was a teenager. He also did not tell porkies. You didn't know him. I did. I had many cars from the 1950s during my youth, and they had carburetors and mechanical (not electric) fuel pumps. I never did anything like my dad, but those cars were not difficult to backfire. I also bump-started many of those cars in my day. 

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


Aredwood
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  #2137496 30-Nov-2018 19:53
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I know someone who had an early 90s Nissan Pulsar that did really loud backfires. Yes, it was carburetor, and the carb didn't have a fuel cut solenoid. So to make it backfire, all he had to do was turn the ignition off for a few seconds while the car was moving and still in gear (manual gearbox). Turn the ignition back on - BOOM.

The carburetor will still be doing it's job - mixing petrol and air together in the ideal ratio for combustion. Combine with a still hot engine and exhaust system, all you need is a spark. And of course the engine has an ignition system and spark plugs.

Even if the car has an electric fuel pump, there will still be a small amount of petrol stored in the carburetor float bowl. So backfires are sometimes still possible on such cars.

You can also often modify an EFI petrol engine to do the same thing. Assuming that the engine doesnt have spark sensing coils, all you have to do is install a switch in the power feed to the coils.

Although not recommend for any modern cars. As you can overheat the catalytic converter.





Rikkitic
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  #2137500 30-Nov-2018 20:03
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Thanks for the backup. I actually do know what I'm talking about here. Exhaust backfires are easy to trigger in older cars, and maybe newer ones. A slight miscalculation can easily blow the exhaust out the back.

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


blakamin
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  #2137506 30-Nov-2018 20:29
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I used to do that in every Holden up until 1988... That's about when they went to electric fuel pumps.

 

 

 

Key-off backfires forever!

 

I might've blown some mufflers up in the day by leaving the ignition off a tad too long.

 

It might be why I learned to stick weld thin steel back in the day too.... It turns out muffler shops know when you split a muffler along its seams, you're not driving normally, and "No, dickhead, warranty won't cover that!"

 

 

 

 

 

All good fun, unless you turned the key too far and locked the steering column! cool


Rikkitic
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  #2137518 30-Nov-2018 20:43
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30s cars didn't have steering locks, Also not 50s.

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


MikeB4
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  #2137522 30-Nov-2018 20:55
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what was the motor vehicle involved?


blakamin
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  #2137523 30-Nov-2018 20:56
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HQ holdens, Toranas and commodores all did...

 

Jeez, it's not like it was a secret. Every teen in Oz that got a licence in the 80's has probably done it.


MikeB4
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  #2137524 30-Nov-2018 21:04
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There is a huge difference between a HQ or Commodore and a 1930s car with low pressure fuel systems, low compression engines, dodgy ignition but yeah I don't really care. 


SilverStone
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  #2137530 30-Nov-2018 21:23
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For some reason, I CAN'T stand fried garlic smell. Don't get me wrong, I like garlic a lot, but the smell of cooked garlic just triggers me. 


blakamin
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  #2137531 30-Nov-2018 21:27
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MikeB4:

 

There is a huge difference between a HQ or Commodore and a 1930s car with low pressure fuel systems, low compression engines, dodgy ignition but yeah I don't really care. 

 

 

 

 

Rubbish! You can put your thumb over the fuel hose from a mechanical holden fuel pump and stop it spraying everywhere!

 

And it has NOTHING TO DO WITH FUEL PRESSURE. It has to do with fuel build up. It depends how long you do it and how far the fuel gets. Once you provide spark again... BOOM!!!

 

 

 

 

 

Admit it, Mike, you just don't like being proven wrong.

 

 

 

Edit: also works in FX (48/215.. 1948), FJ, EK, FB, EH, EJ, HD, HR, HK, T, G, LC, LJ, LH, LX, UC, VB, VC, VH, VK... You want a list of Fords too? Chrysler?

 

 

 

The ones I listed were ones with steering locks.


networkn
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  #2137534 30-Nov-2018 21:31
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SilverStone:

 

For some reason, I CAN'T stand fried garlic smell. Don't get me wrong, I like garlic a lot, but the smell of cooked garlic just triggers me. 

 

 

Wow, that's quite unfortunate. Is it the smell of overcooked garlic? Only relatively recently I learned not to overcook garlic otherwise it goes bitter. The smell of fresh garlic hitting heated (not superheated) oil is something of legend as far as I am concerned. Is it that smell or the one that happens later on?

 

 


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