Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 
11960 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2076

Trusted

  Reply # 1493539 17-Feb-2016 00:55
Send private message

chevrolux:

 

We added a 'Demeanour' field in our call logging just recently. We are tiny so call volumes aren't high so a nice easy way to keep track of it. I got sick of hearing from customer service they were getting abuse. Next step is I will colour code the field so when you look at calls from that customer if it is all red and then they start yet another abusive call it will be 'please just hold while we transfer you to the manager'. The manager who won't just sit and take it.

 

It annoys me people think they have the right to abuse telco staff purely just because they are at a telco. We want to help you but if you start with f you and f that you aren't going to get anywhere very fast.

 

 

 

 

Thats when we do our job as per the JD, otherwise we would have gone the extra mile. Irrespective of call centres or whatever, we are all humans.Some people see it otherwise. Keyboard warriors comes to mind. 


1235 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 522


  Reply # 1493598 17-Feb-2016 08:11
Send private message

dejadeadnz: I work in the Chief Risk Officer's office for a major financial institution. Anyone who writes that the "customer is an arrogant twat" will be up for a very serious conversation with me, someone from the General Counsel's office (both lawyers) and HR and given a very stern talk about the Privacy Act.

 

I don't remember Risk people being involved in this case, but this guy went through a formal disciplinary hearing involving his team leader, manager and HR and was put on a performance improvement plan as it wasn't his first offence. All our CSRs had training in the Privacy Act as part of their induction training - not just because any information held about the customer, including notes, would have to be turned over if requested, but also with regards to what information could or could not be given or confirmed over the phone, e.g. if a wife called about transactions on a husband's account.


 
 
 
 


Try Wrike: fast, easy, and efficient project collaboration software
572 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 100


  Reply # 1493788 17-Feb-2016 11:07
Send private message

I used to work for a finance company, and didn't speak to customers directly as a rule. Occasionally I'd call to query something. But we had one bloke who was really abusive to the female staff, they'd simply note exactly what he'd say. It got so bad that they had his number routed only to my phone as he hated talking to me. I knew his number off by heart in the end.
He was proper nuts.

103 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 27


  Reply # 1493819 17-Feb-2016 11:22
Send private message

Dairyxox:

 

Cant think of a good reason. Often the internet and obscurity don't mix well.

 

 

 

 

Apologies. If he spoke to a female member of staff, he tried to turn the call into the type he should be calling an 0900 number for.


1154 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 833

Subscriber

  Reply # 1493945 17-Feb-2016 12:54
One person supports this post
Send private message

andrew027:

 

I don't remember Risk people being involved in this case, but this guy went through a formal disciplinary hearing involving his team leader, manager and HR and was put on a performance improvement plan as it wasn't his first offence. All our CSRs had training in the Privacy Act as part of their induction training - not just because any information held about the customer, including notes, would have to be turned over if requested, but also with regards to what information could or could not be given or confirmed over the phone, e.g. if a wife called about transactions on a husband's account.

 

 

 

 

Good to hear other organisations taking these things seriously. Let's just say that I know one bank which has, shall we say, some of the most awful and useless Privacy Act-related training imaginable.

 

 

 

 


1 | 2 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

IBM leads Call for Code to use cloud, data, AI, blockchain for natural disaster relief
Posted 25-May-2018 14:12


New FUJIFILM X-T100 aims to do better job than smartphones
Posted 24-May-2018 20:17


Stuff takes 100% ownership of Stuff Fibre
Posted 24-May-2018 19:41


Exhibition to showcase digital artwork from across the globe
Posted 23-May-2018 16:44


Auckland tops list of most vulnerable cities in a zombie apocalypse
Posted 23-May-2018 12:52


ASB first bank in New Zealand to step out with Garmin Pay
Posted 23-May-2018 00:10


Umbrellar becomes Microsoft Cloud Solution Provider
Posted 22-May-2018 15:43


Three New Zealand projects shortlisted in IDC Asia Pacific Smart Cities Awards
Posted 22-May-2018 15:14


UpStarters - the New Zealand tech and innovation story
Posted 21-May-2018 09:55


Lightbox updates platform with new streaming options
Posted 17-May-2018 13:09


Norton Core router launches with high-performance, IoT security in New Zealand
Posted 16-May-2018 02:00


D-Link ANZ launches new 4G LTE Dual SIM M2M VPN Router
Posted 15-May-2018 19:30


New Panasonic LUMIX FT7 ideal for outdoor: waterproof, dustproof
Posted 15-May-2018 19:17


Ryanair Goes All-In on AWS
Posted 15-May-2018 19:14


Te Papa and EQC Minecraft Mod shakes up earthquake education
Posted 15-May-2018 19:12



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.