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Fred99
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  #1513897 15-Mar-2016 18:23
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If you've got family, then have a plan.

 

We did have a rudimentary plan, SWMBO and our son worked / went to school in the CBD, she parked her car in an open space away from tall buildings, if anything happened, then that was a meeting point. Then the plan was to get home.  There was no reliable cellphone contact including SMS in the CBD in those hours after the quake.  It took about 5 hours before I got a message - our landline was actually still working, SWMBO had seen the son of a friend in town, he made it home and his mother called me to say she was okay, but another couple of hours before an SMS was delivered to me saying that our son had made it to the pre-arranged meeting spot, and they were about to leave.  By evening, the local cell towers were out.  Mains power was down and cell tower backup batteries didn't last long.  I've heard that cell tower battery backup is better now, but can't confirm it - "I read it somewhere".  I wouldn't count on it being useful - as despite pleading messages on the radio to limit use to SMS, the networks were hopelessly congested.
It was not a very nice afternoon.  Our landline rang constantly, most land-lines were down, me running messages from people who'd contacted me to try to get messages to neighbours.  Kept me busy though - which under the circumstances was probably a good thing.

 

The September 2010 quake happened before dawn.  We had no significant damage (alas not the case in Feb 2011).  Torch near the bed is a good idea - and some easy to don shoes.  Feb 22 the contents of every cupboard ended up smashed on our floors, large plate-glass windows exploded.  Shredding your feet on broken glass while panicking in the dark would add misery on top of misery.  

 

Never had any problem getting radio, a cheap battery pocket radio was fine, car radio was there.  We do tend to keep cars topped up with fuel these days - my 4WD was low on fuel, and days later there were massive queues at the service stations that were open. 

 

It might be a bit different when Wellington is hit, as there's a good chance that all road transport will be cut-off, so emergency food supplies will be by air or ship until roads are restored.  In Chch the supermarket chains did a commendable job getting their stores cleaned up, open, and stocked, apart from some panic buying (bread FFS - not sure why people panic buy bread when it goes mouldy quickly).  Fresh water is a no-brainer, decent first-aid kit, pet food, canned/dried food, something to cook on, a few tarps and ropes could be handy, she'll be right.

 

 

 

 


 
 
 

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Geektastic
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  #1513899 15-Mar-2016 18:30
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Containers make excellent secure, dry places to store your stuff away from your home and also provide watertight shelter you can sleep in if nothing else is available.

 

Pelican cases are also excellent for dry storage of clothing, foodstuffs and so on.






frankv
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  #1513901 15-Mar-2016 18:40
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joker97:

Need a non cordless phone though.

 

 

 

Not necessarily nowadays.

 

1. One of our cordless phones can be used to power the base station from the phone's battery.

 

2. Our cordless phone base station is plugged into a UPS anyway. As is the modem, so our Wifi should be OK too, for a wee while, in case there's land-based Internet. And we will be able to charge phones too.

 

 




gzt

gzt
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  #1513904 15-Mar-2016 18:50
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flyingdutchdude:

Its worth noting that immediately after the large quakes in canty it was easier to reach others via SMS due to the congested network. Perhaps build this into your families emergency plan in case the need arises.


Agree. But keep in mind that SMS is not a guaranteed delivery protocol. I have had a few go missing over the years hard to tell if it was phone or network issues, but at least some of the time probably network.

MikeB4
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  #1513943 15-Mar-2016 20:05
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Fred99:

If you've got family, then have a plan.


We did have a rudimentary plan, SWMBO and our son worked / went to school in the CBD, she parked her car in an open space away from tall buildings, if anything happened, then that was a meeting point. Then the plan was to get home.  There was no reliable cellphone contact including SMS in the CBD in those hours after the quake.  It took about 5 hours before I got a message - our landline was actually still working, SWMBO had seen the son of a friend in town, he made it home and his mother called me to say she was okay, but another couple of hours before an SMS was delivered to me saying that our son had made it to the pre-arranged meeting spot, and they were about to leave.  By evening, the local cell towers were out.  Mains power was down and cell tower backup batteries didn't last long.  I've heard that cell tower battery backup is better now, but can't confirm it - "I read it somewhere".  I wouldn't count on it being useful - as despite pleading messages on the radio to limit use to SMS, the networks were hopelessly congested.
It was not a very nice afternoon.  Our landline rang constantly, most land-lines were down, me running messages from people who'd contacted me to try to get messages to neighbours.  Kept me busy though - which under the circumstances was probably a good thing.


The September 2010 quake happened before dawn.  We had no significant damage (alas not the case in Feb 2011).  Torch near the bed is a good idea - and some easy to don shoes.  Feb 22 the contents of every cupboard ended up smashed on our floors, large plate-glass windows exploded.  Shredding your feet on broken glass while panicking in the dark would add misery on top of misery.  


Never had any problem getting radio, a cheap battery pocket radio was fine, car radio was there.  We do tend to keep cars topped up with fuel these days - my 4WD was low on fuel, and days later there were massive queues at the service stations that were open. 


It might be a bit different when Wellington is hit, as there's a good chance that all road transport will be cut-off, so emergency food supplies will be by air or ship until roads are restored.  In Chch the supermarket chains did a commendable job getting their stores cleaned up, open, and stocked, apart from some panic buying (bread FFS - not sure why people panic buy bread when it goes mouldy quickly).  Fresh water is a no-brainer, decent first-aid kit, pet food, canned/dried food, something to cook on, a few tarps and ropes could be handy, she'll be right.


 


 



I have always thought about fuel for the motor vehicle in these circumstances, for most of my adult life I have always kept
My fuel tank between full and half full.

PhantomNVD
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  #1513984 15-Mar-2016 21:07
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I just keep a 20l bottle full, and one of those big 10L water cooler canisters should suffice for drinking water if the tank gets damaged/contaminated. Car charging and radio should easily suffice, and hopefully the Skiny broadband will recover long before the wired connections are waiting to be rewired. A large box of mixed tins and a couple plastic tubs with rice and pasta sorts the food.

Bogrolls and a 10L Gib bucket should do the neccissaries for a couple days...

timmmay
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  #1513987 15-Mar-2016 21:11
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They recommend at least 3L of water per person per day. Assuming a family of 4, and a week's water, that's 84L. That's minimum. Plus food for that time, toilet roll, hand sanitizer, power, heating if required, cooking. It's not that expensive to be slightly prepared, a few hundred dollars perhaps.




nickb800
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  #1513995 15-Mar-2016 21:34
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Our area of Christchurch lost power in the Feb earthquake, but not internet - I powered our router off a 12v battery, and presumably the battery backups/diesel generator at the exchange kept DSL on. If you are reliant on a cabinet (whether DSL or Cable) this will probably die within a day as they only have a small battery backup. Of course if it's really bad, then the exchange or cabinet would loose its fibre backhaul and you'd be SOL with internet and landline (except perhaps you could call others served off your exchange?)

 

SMS was a mess, took hours for messages to be received, then sometimes received twice or not at all. Didn't try calling on mobile, but I'd imagine it was congested, even in less affected areas

 

A crystal AM radio doesn't require any battery at all, the energy of the transmission is sufficient to reproduce sound in an earpiece. Probably handy to have in your emergency kit. I'd put money on AM coming back before FM in a bad disaster - fewer transmission sites, often on flat land, compared to FM or TV towers up on hills with cliff-edge access


keewee01
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  #1514059 15-Mar-2016 23:48
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frankv:

 

joker97:

Need a non cordless phone though.

 

 

 

Not necessarily nowadays.

 

1. One of our cordless phones can be used to power the base station from the phone's battery.

 

2. Our cordless phone base station is plugged into a UPS anyway. As is the modem, so our Wifi should be OK too, for a wee while, in case there's land-based Internet. And we will be able to charge phones too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seriously... you have a UPS and the internet connection and WiFi would be your priority to keep up in a major disaster.... There are a lot of things I'd keep powered well ahead of internet connection and WiFi!


keewee01
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  #1514060 15-Mar-2016 23:51
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Something damn useful in the survival kit is baby wipes - when there is no plentiful clean running water to bath in, it is nice and refreshing to be able to get clean after several days!


Aredwood
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  #1514074 16-Mar-2016 01:03

keewee01:

frankv:


joker97:

Need a non cordless phone though.


 


Not necessarily nowadays.


1. One of our cordless phones can be used to power the base station from the phone's battery.


2. Our cordless phone base station is plugged into a UPS anyway. As is the modem, so our Wifi should be OK too, for a wee while, in case there's land-based Internet. And we will be able to charge phones too.


 



 


Seriously... you have a UPS and the internet connection and WiFi would be your priority to keep up in a major disaster.... There are a lot of things I'd keep powered well ahead of internet connection and WiFi!




Having working Internet and wifi is actually useful in a disaster. You can immediately post to Facebook that you are Ok. So family in other areas won't be overloading the phone network. There are lots of free voip apps available. And easy to get news and information from the internet.

I wouldn't rely on FM radio. As 8 to 10 years ago there was a big power outage in Auckland that took every single FM station off air. I was both shocked and amazed that none of them has backup power.

Myself. 200 amp hour of battery capacity at home. For backup to internet. Another 200 in my van. Which also has an inverter. Accessible drain valves on my 300AL hot water cylinder. A pipe to gravity feed the downstairs toilet from the spa pool. And have a 3 phase generator. Have 2x 45kg lpg bottles with both a gas hob and gas oven.





frankv
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  #1514111 16-Mar-2016 07:07
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keewee01:

 

Seriously... you have a UPS and the internet connection and WiFi would be your priority to keep up in a major disaster.... There are a lot of things I'd keep powered well ahead of internet connection and WiFi!

 

 

Not necessarily. Just saying that I'd still have those (and phone) if I wanted them.

 

I'm curious what you would use a UPS for? It ain't gonna run (e.g.) a fridge for long. 

 

 


axxaa
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  #1514143 16-Mar-2016 08:23
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Get to know your local ham radio operators, they provide a emergency communications during emergencies


keewee01
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  #1514171 16-Mar-2016 08:52
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frankv:

 

keewee01:

 

Seriously... you have a UPS and the internet connection and WiFi would be your priority to keep up in a major disaster.... There are a lot of things I'd keep powered well ahead of internet connection and WiFi!

 

 

Not necessarily. Just saying that I'd still have those (and phone) if I wanted them.

 

I'm curious what you would use a UPS for? It ain't gonna run (e.g.) a fridge for long. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'd use it to keep mobiles charged and use internet via that - if and when available.

 

 

 

Our family has arrangements to contact a family member at the other end of the country to let them know we're safe and they will post on the internet.


gnfb

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  #1514188 16-Mar-2016 09:03
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Someone may have already done it but in a country like NZ where each day we live with the possibility of a natural disaster, It would make sense to me to have cheap emergrancey comms device for all households say. Havnt given it any thought as to how it would work or what it would or could do. The main thing that comes through in this thread is being able to communicate and get information. 





Is an English Man living in New Zealand. Not a writer, an Observer he says. Graham is a seasoned 'traveler" with his sometimes arrogant, but honest opinion on life. He loves the Internet!.

 

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