Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
264 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 37


  Reply # 1517744 22-Mar-2016 15:59
Send private message

We get cluster flies here, which could also be known as retard flies.

 

If I understand it right, from hibernating and a hell of a lot of inbreeding, these flies awake and don't seem to have the usual fly brain functions. It's quite funny to see them on their back, just spinning around and around... or others next to a limb, which must have just dropped right off.

 

They also don't even move as you approach them, so squishing them is incredibly easy.

 

What to do well however, is bunch up in clusters (hence the name). They release a pheromone which attracts more, and so it's not unusual to see a pile of say 20 cluster flies almost on top of each other. Very gross, and unfortunately the pheromone tends to linger around even after the flies are gone, which then brings more to that spot.

 

Previously we bug bombed the roof where they were all staying over the winter, and that worked pretty well. But last winter we didn't. I don't think we'll skip that again ;)


1243 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 530


  Reply # 1517748 22-Mar-2016 16:02
Send private message

SepticSceptic:

 

 

Mmm, flypaper !!! 

 

Actually, in my limited experience, flypaper does work well. But it's not a particularly pleasant looking thing to have hanging in your house. You can make a reasonably effective fly trap by putting some sugar water (or vinegar) in a glass, then making a paper cone, cutting the point off to leave a hole just big enough for a fly to get through, and sitting the inverted cone in the glass so the hole sits a centimeter or so above the water.

 

 

 

 


444 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 239


  Reply # 1517810 22-Mar-2016 16:57
Send private message

LostBoyNZ:

 

We get cluster flies here, which could also be known as retard flies.

 

If I understand it right, from hibernating and a hell of a lot of inbreeding, these flies awake and don't seem to have the usual fly brain functions. It's quite funny to see them on their back, just spinning around and around... or others next to a limb, which must have just dropped right off.

 

They also don't even move as you approach them, so squishing them is incredibly easy.

 

What to do well however, is bunch up in clusters (hence the name). They release a pheromone which attracts more, and so it's not unusual to see a pile of say 20 cluster flies almost on top of each other. Very gross, and unfortunately the pheromone tends to linger around even after the flies are gone, which then brings more to that spot.

 

Previously we bug bombed the roof where they were all staying over the winter, and that worked pretty well. But last winter we didn't. I don't think we'll skip that again ;)

 

 

We got these this year. Absolutely dopey - you could pretty much just reach out and squish them with your hand. I assumed their dumbness was due to the fact that they hatched in early spring when the weather was still pretty cold. The flies that came along in summer were a lot zippier.


1204 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 247

Subscriber

  Reply # 1517836 22-Mar-2016 17:41
One person supports this post
Send private message

vexxxboy:

 

timmmay:

 

Kill them with fire.

 

 

 

 

bit dangerous ,, Petrol works especially if they are underground . A couple of litres down the opening and seal. all dead  and hive useless in 2-3 days . Gets the adrenaline going i tell you .

 

 

 

 

Agreed but not sure why it took a few days. I found after I dropped a match on the petrol I poured down the nest it all happened pretty quickly :)

 

 

 

 





nunz

14282 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1848


  Reply # 1517839 22-Mar-2016 17:46
Send private message

LostBoyNZ:

 

We get cluster flies here, which could also be known as retard flies.

 

If I understand it right, from hibernating and a hell of a lot of inbreeding, these flies awake and don't seem to have the usual fly brain functions. It's quite funny to see them on their back, just spinning around and around... or others next to a limb, which must have just dropped right off.

 

They also don't even move as you approach them, so squishing them is incredibly easy.

 

What to do well however, is bunch up in clusters (hence the name). They release a pheromone which attracts more, and so it's not unusual to see a pile of say 20 cluster flies almost on top of each other. Very gross, and unfortunately the pheromone tends to linger around even after the flies are gone, which then brings more to that spot.

 

Previously we bug bombed the roof where they were all staying over the winter, and that worked pretty well. But last winter we didn't. I don't think we'll skip that again ;)

 

 

 

 

My brother gets those in his location, as they are common in some places. But they appear to be a smaller type of fly, and don't behave in the same way as blow and house flys.


755 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 169


  Reply # 1517907 22-Mar-2016 19:07
Send private message

mattwnz:

 

jpoc:

 

The last thing that you should consider using is one of those UV zappers or electrical fly swatters.

 

What happens when one of those gadgets zaps an insect?

 

Current passes through the insect's body, the insect presents a resistive load and the current causes it to heat up.

 

Part of the internal fluid inside the fly will boil and that will cause a huge spike in internal pressure and thus the insect's body will rupture.

 

Only part of the insect will be heated up and most of the fluid will be expelled as an invisible cloud of drops that will fall out over an area a couple of metres across.

 

Those droplets will be full of the bacteria that are present in the insect's gut.

 

When I was living in Germany, some consumer show examined the surfaces in the vicinity of a zapper in a restaurant and they found bits of congealed fly insides all over the surfaces near to the zapper and they also pointed out that anyone in the vicinity of a zapper when it had just zapped a fly would be inhaling the droplets - germs included.

 

Not in my kitchen thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is there scientific proof about that though? Also is that any worse than inhaling insecticides, which is what flyspray is? They have them in many restaurants, so I guess if you eat at one that has these things, then depending on where it is positioned, you could be eating insect guts! But people eat insects all the time without knowing it, and you don't know what may have found it's way into the processed food you are buying.  Personally I think there are bigger things to worry about, and you don't have to have these things in a kitchen to work. The reason why many people have so many flies in their house, is because they don't keep things clean, and wash up dirty dishes when they need doing.

 

 

Yes and yes.

 

And it is much worse than eating insects. Your body is very good at avoiding infections when you eat something with a load of bacteria or viruses. Only a few infections can cause harm if ingested, norovirus, E.Coli, cholera etc. Your lungs are much more susceptible to infection than your gut.


898 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 46

Trusted

  Reply # 1517985 22-Mar-2016 21:47
Send private message

jpoc:

 

The last thing that you should consider using is one of those UV zappers or electrical fly swatters.

 

What happens when one of those gadgets zaps an insect?

 

Current passes through the insect's body, the insect presents a resistive load and the current causes it to heat up.

 

Part of the internal fluid inside the fly will boil and that will cause a huge spike in internal pressure and thus the insect's body will rupture.

 

Only part of the insect will be heated up and most of the fluid will be expelled as an invisible cloud of drops that will fall out over an area a couple of metres across.

 

Those droplets will be full of the bacteria that are present in the insect's gut.

 

When I was living in Germany, some consumer show examined the surfaces in the vicinity of a zapper in a restaurant and they found bits of congealed fly insides all over the surfaces near to the zapper and they also pointed out that anyone in the vicinity of a zapper when it had just zapped a fly would be inhaling the droplets - germs included.

 

Not in my kitchen thank you.

 

 

 

 

Presumably the heat would also kill the germs...?





 

11831 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3836

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1518005 22-Mar-2016 22:37
Send private message

Maybe keeping geckos or venus fly traps?






1243 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 530


  Reply # 1518118 23-Mar-2016 08:24
Send private message

Geektastic: Maybe keeping geckos or venus fly traps? 

 

Or a few spiders?


5172 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1097

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1518167 23-Mar-2016 09:21
Send private message

jpoc:

The last thing that you should consider using is one of those UV zappers or electrical fly swatters.


...

Not in my kitchen thank you.


 



Same goes for overhead lights: especially halogen and spot pots. Cooking meat isn't much different either.

I have an immune system with millions of years of practice handling bacteria.

But you do highlight the needs to clean things at least occasionally.

:-)




____________________________________________________
I'm on a high fibre diet. 

 

High fibre diet


518 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 117


  Reply # 1518174 23-Mar-2016 09:30
Send private message

Geektastic:

 

Maybe keeping geckos or venus fly traps?

 

 

Hmm, tempted to look into getting a venus fly trap.  They look like they aren't too hard to care for.





2422 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1182

Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1518233 23-Mar-2016 10:37
Send private message

geoffwnz:

 

Geektastic:

 

Maybe keeping geckos or venus fly traps?

 

 

Hmm, tempted to look into getting a venus fly trap.  They look like they aren't too hard to care for.

 

 

 

 

Had a couple of them. They didn't catch many flies. And, just because it was cool to watch, I would often feed them with flies I'd swatted. They died.

 

I'd say you would need a couple of hundred venus fly traps to make a significant difference. And then, one day, your cat would go missing....

 

 


898 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 46

Trusted

  Reply # 1518325 23-Mar-2016 12:00
Send private message

geoffwnz:

Geektastic:


Maybe keeping geckos or venus fly traps?



Hmm, tempted to look into getting a venus fly trap.  They look like they aren't too hard to care for.



They don't catch much:



They need a *lot* of direct sunlight or they die.




 

Meow
7787 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3847

Moderator
Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  Reply # 1518330 23-Mar-2016 12:09
Send private message

We live in an area where Flies can be sometimes a problem and have found one product that works time and time again and keeps flies out of the house (despite many windows open), flies also don't rise from the dead. The answer? Ecomist. They're not the cheapest but you sure know when the dispenser has ran out only since there are many many flies around during that time.

 

Would recommend to anyone having fly problems. Both my parents and I have got one and during the winter I just replace the spray with something like Coffee flavor to make the place smell awesome. Also in Wellington there is a guy that'll just drop off new cans and invoice you which makes it darn easy to keep on top of the refills.





7201 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3754


  Reply # 1518339 23-Mar-2016 12:13
Send private message

mattwnz:

 

jpoc:

 

The last thing that you should consider using is one of those UV zappers or electrical fly swatters.

 

What happens when one of those gadgets zaps an insect?

 

Current passes through the insect's body, the insect presents a resistive load and the current causes it to heat up.

 

Part of the internal fluid inside the fly will boil and that will cause a huge spike in internal pressure and thus the insect's body will rupture.

 

Only part of the insect will be heated up and most of the fluid will be expelled as an invisible cloud of drops that will fall out over an area a couple of metres across.

 

Those droplets will be full of the bacteria that are present in the insect's gut.

 

When I was living in Germany, some consumer show examined the surfaces in the vicinity of a zapper in a restaurant and they found bits of congealed fly insides all over the surfaces near to the zapper and they also pointed out that anyone in the vicinity of a zapper when it had just zapped a fly would be inhaling the droplets - germs included.

 

Not in my kitchen thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Is there scientific proof about that though? Also is that any worse than inhaling insecticides, which is what flyspray is? They have them in many restaurants, so I guess if you eat at one that has these things, then depending on where it is positioned, you could be eating insect guts! But people eat insects all the time without knowing it, and you don't know what may have found it's way into the processed food you are buying.  Personally I think there are bigger things to worry about, and you don't have to have these things in a kitchen to work. The reason why many people have so many flies in their house, is because they don't keep things clean, and wash up dirty dishes when they need doing.

 

 

 

 

"Don’t use fly swatters near food preparation areas because they may result in contaminating food with insect body parts. Similarly, never use a "bug zapper" to kill flies near food preparation areas, as the insect body often explodes upon touching the wires and insect body parts can be propelled over several feet from the device."

 

link  This article suggests that insecticide / fly spray should be a last resort after other methods to control them.

 

Wiki link to diseases they can transmit.  So they're a bit more than just "annoying".

 

 

 

 


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic

Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.