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Mad Scientist
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  #1537041 20-Apr-2016 21:45
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MadEngineer: I'd like to know why the Americans have made the l in solder silent as in "sodder".

 

La-bruh-TOry ... ??





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


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  #1537056 20-Apr-2016 22:11
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MadEngineer: I'd like to know why the Americans have made the l in solder silent as in "sodder".

 

I heard that on How Its Made. I rewound it about 4 times to re hear it. Yep, weird.

 

English is dumb. Many rules, which is fine, but many exceptions. Americans say rowt. Rowter. Makes sense. Why do we say root for route, yet we say rowter.

 

Americans say poe tay toe like we do, why do we say toe mah toe? Doesnt make sense.  


 
 
 
 


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  #1537062 20-Apr-2016 22:15
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tdgeek:

 

MadEngineer: I'd like to know why the Americans have made the l in solder silent as in "sodder".

 

I heard that on How Its Made. I rewound it about 4 times to re hear it. Yep, weird.

 

English is dumb. Many rules, which is fine, but many exceptions. Americans say rowt. Rowter. Makes sense. Why do we say root for route, yet we say rowter.

 

Americans say poe tay toe like we do, why do we say toe mah toe? Doesnt make sense.  

 

 

 

 

I perennially feel sorry for my son who is learning to spell. Every time he spells a word the way it sounds and I tell him how it really is spelt, his little face gets an outraged look like 

 

"What the ACTUAL F***!??!"

 

 


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  #1537063 20-Apr-2016 22:18
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networkn:

 

tdgeek:

 

MadEngineer: I'd like to know why the Americans have made the l in solder silent as in "sodder".

 

I heard that on How Its Made. I rewound it about 4 times to re hear it. Yep, weird.

 

English is dumb. Many rules, which is fine, but many exceptions. Americans say rowt. Rowter. Makes sense. Why do we say root for route, yet we say rowter.

 

Americans say poe tay toe like we do, why do we say toe mah toe? Doesnt make sense.  

 

 

 

 

I perennially feel sorry for my son who is learning to spell. Every time he spells a word the way it sounds and I tell him how it really is spelt, his little face gets an outraged look like 

 

"What the ACTUAL F***!??!"

 

 

 

 

Priceless.  


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  #1537064 20-Apr-2016 22:22
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Priceless.  

 

 

He is SUCH a chilled little fella normally as well. I am what is known as a VERY sarcastic person, and the other day he mimicked me perfectly when I was correcting his spelling of a word (Which I can't recall but I recall thinking it was absurd), and he cocks his head to the left a little, and says "Seriously!?, You're Kidding RIGHT?!" I just about choked to death laughing.


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  #1537066 20-Apr-2016 22:29
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TwoSeven:

 

Back in the days when I used to write standards documents,  the convention was to use American spelling in code.  An acronym is always pronounced letter by letter and is written in capitals (I was taught to imagine full-stops between each letter).  FBI, JPG, GIF, SQL, WHO are examples.  These are technically called Initialisms.

 

If the acronym forms a word like NASA, SCUBA, it is pronounced as a word, but still written in capitals.  If it is a short form of a word (like caps for capitals) then it is written in lower case and pronounced as a word.

 

 

They're initialisms until people start saying them as words. Most of those examples you gave are no different to the last two. What makes NASA and SCUBA special?


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  #1537137 21-Apr-2016 06:25
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networkn:


Priceless.  



He is SUCH a chilled little fella normally as well. I am what is known as a VERY sarcastic person, and the other day he mimicked me perfectly when I was correcting his spelling of a word (Which I can't recall but I recall thinking it was absurd), and he cocks his head to the left a little, and says "Seriously!?, You're Kidding RIGHT?!" I just about choked to death laughing.



They're so cute when they are learning to spell.

 
 
 
 


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  #1537142 21-Apr-2016 06:54
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Good explanations for every other sense but where does the American sense 'rooting for a team' come from?


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  #1537195 21-Apr-2016 08:58
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bazzer:

 

TwoSeven:

 

Back in the days when I used to write standards documents,  the convention was to use American spelling in code.  An acronym is always pronounced letter by letter and is written in capitals (I was taught to imagine full-stops between each letter).  FBI, JPG, GIF, SQL, WHO are examples.  These are technically called Initialisms.

 

If the acronym forms a word like NASA, SCUBA, it is pronounced as a word, but still written in capitals.  If it is a short form of a word (like caps for capitals) then it is written in lower case and pronounced as a word.

 

 

They're initialisms until people start saying them as words. Most of those examples you gave are no different to the last two. What makes NASA and SCUBA special?

 

 

Vowels. Enough vowels to make them actual cromulent English words. (I know, Gif and Who have vowels and one is an actual word already)

 

 


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  #1537315 21-Apr-2016 11:18
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I'm English, so it's root.

 

Don't get me started on the whole day-ta vs dar-ta thing.

 

 


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  #1537548 21-Apr-2016 15:39
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martyyn:

I'm English, so it's root.


Don't get me started on the whole day-ta vs dar-ta thing.


 



I'm happy to use either of those.

Al-LOOM-in-um vs al-you-MIN-ee-um. :)

Stu

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  #1537552 21-Apr-2016 15:42
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Actually I think you'll find in the US they spell it aluminum, whereas here we spell it aluminium :-)

 

 

 

ETA: Hence the reason it's not pronounced the same way.





Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

 

 

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  #1537765 21-Apr-2016 21:22
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I think there's two main reasons for the way the Yanks spell and talk the English language.

 

One: after the War of Independence they wanted to impose their own influence on the English language and spell words differently

 

Two: Much of the US population has ties to non English speaking countries of Europe and other places so their accents have influenced how the words are spoken.

 

A bit off topic; As for the way they write the date, (MM/DD/YY) that's one really weird way of doing it.





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  #1538425 22-Apr-2016 21:12
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I say :  The quickest 'root' home is via Riccarton Rd

 

Rowter as for the instrument used in woodworking and also when I refer to my wireless 'rowter'

 

 




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  #1538441 22-Apr-2016 21:55
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qwertee:

 

I say :  The quickest 'root' home is via Riccarton Rd

 

Rowter as for the instrument used in woodworking and also when I refer to my wireless 'rowter'

 

 

 

 

Except at rush hour :P


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