Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
51 posts

Master Geek


  #1538537 23-Apr-2016 07:47
Send private message

mid 60's

 

 

 

I rather tended to use a log book so my fellow co-workers gave me the appellation of loggy. later changed to legs because of my middle name.

 

That was when I was a junior mechanician working for the Post Office (well before that part of the PO was called Telecoms).


337 posts

Ultimate Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1538540 23-Apr-2016 07:56
Send private message

Early 70s at school was the last time I used one, but I still have it. I might have a bit of a struggle remembering how to use it.

 
 
 
 


1290 posts

Uber Geek


  #1538553 23-Apr-2016 09:07
Send private message

DaveB:

 

THREAD HIJACK!

 

Seeing you think people are too young to partake in this thread if they do not know (or have never used) a slide rule, I think I should up the ante and mention an abacus - just to shorten the list of participants. Both were compulsory at my school.

 

I've never used a slide rule, but did use abacuses during primary school in the 90s.





rm *


614 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #1538558 23-Apr-2016 09:30
Send private message

tdgeek:

 

Slide Rule, very cool indeed. I wonder how that compares to todays tech? Pretty good I imagine. And compare to todays math?? Excellent I'd say. I feel the three R's have taken a back seat these days

 

 

You can still use a slide rule when your phone's battery is flat.  =-)


2169 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1538568 23-Apr-2016 10:29
Send private message

nzlegs:

 

 

 

That was when I was a junior mechanician working for the Post Office (well before that part of the PO was called Telecoms).

 

this cracks me up.  seems every ex-post office worker pulls this line (or "nzpo, back before it was Telecom"). case in point how it has become an over quoted line amongst one of my social circles.  "Slide rules? Luxury! Back in my day, before NZPO became Telecom, we had to build our own slide rules!" ... and other jokes around extended smoko breaks ...


4418 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #1539571 23-Apr-2016 11:05
Send private message

MadEngineer:

 

nzlegs:

 

 

 

That was when I was a junior mechanician working for the Post Office (well before that part of the PO was called Telecoms).

 

this cracks me up.  seems every ex-post office worker pulls this line (or "nzpo, back before it was Telecom"). case in point how it has become an over quoted line amongst one of my social circles.  "Slide rules? Luxury! Back in my day, before NZPO became Telecom, we had to build our own slide rules!" ... and other jokes around extended smoko breaks ...

 

 

How about "P&T, back before it was NZPO ..."?





Sometimes I just sit and think. Other times I just sit.


593 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  #1540615 23-Apr-2016 12:15
Send private message

The Air Force still use them for weight and balancing of the C-130 Hercules. Crazy ay!

 
 
 
 


6009 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
DR
Lifetime subscriber

  #1540618 23-Apr-2016 12:34
Send private message

 

... in 1973, when I bought a shiny new Sinclair Cambridge (type 1) 4-function calculator

(Can't renumber the price, but it was expensive!)





Sideface


1868 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1540620 23-Apr-2016 12:38
Send private message

I use one most days when calculating fractional melt flows of polymers. Its the fastest way to do it and I have to admit I enjoy using it.





Ding Ding Ding Ding Ding : Ice cream man , Ice cream man


5609 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1540970 24-Apr-2016 08:50
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

For me it was some time in the early 1960s. If  you never used one, or don't know what one is, you are too young for this thread.

 

 

1972. 

 

I was in high school (in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada) the year they transitioned from slide rules to calculators. One year we got all slide rules all the time, then next year (1973) they were gone. 

 

They were a good way to do fast calculations of large numbers - but you had to decide what level of precision (how many significant digits had to exactly correct) was required in the answer. Less precision means faster answer.  





_____________________________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, click my referral code below to order your car and get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


5609 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1540971 24-Apr-2016 08:53
Send private message

Sideface:

 

 

... in 1973, when I bought a shiny new Sinclair Cambridge (type 1) 4-function calculator

(Can't renumber the price, but it was expensive!)

 

 

 

 

I bought my first calculator in 1972. It could only handle 6 (Update: Hmmm....maybe 8, but definitely not 10) digits and cost C$72 (I was paid $1.45/hour in my part time job) so I had to work just under 50 hours to get that amount of money. I was working after school at a petrol station at 14. Yes, it was illegal. The calculator was the most expensive thing I'd ever bought with my own money. For comparison, you could buy a full (10 gallon) tank of petrol for $4.99 in 1972 -> 49.9 cents / imperial gallon (4.58 litres). 





_____________________________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, click my referral code below to order your car and get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


1940 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1540973 24-Apr-2016 09:01
Send private message

I was about 8 or 9 the last time I used a slide rule, and I got a hiding for it.

 

It was great for playing swords with, but apparently not for playing stab your sister with it.





Life is too short to remove USB safely.


4497 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  #1541028 24-Apr-2016 10:36
Send private message

Give it to Sir Jonny Ive to re-imagine. The Apple Calculator (iCalc), impressive battery life, just enough geek factor.

Could be just the thing to guide Apple over between the Watch and the Car.




Areas of Geek interest: Home Theatre, HTPC, Android Tablets & Phones, iProducts.

1843 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  #1541072 24-Apr-2016 11:26
Send private message

I still have mine, in it's original green and white case. Long since forgotten how to really utilise it. Can do multiplication, and that's it. 40-odd years of never having used it.

 

Use it or loose it.





My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


3890 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #1541121 24-Apr-2016 13:27
Send private message

The slide rule was in fashion for my last couple of years at High School. After I started work in for NZPO as a Trainee Telephone Technician I bought a flash Kovac SM1210M, this was followed shortly after by a Kovac 811ESR which I still use.

 

When I started flying I bought a trusty Kane Mk-6B which I also still use.

 

 

My old High School slide rule

 

 

The trusty Kovac 811 ESR

 

 

 

The Kane MK-6B

 

Who remembers this

 





Sony Xperia X running Sailfish OS. https://sailfishos.org The true independent open source mobile OS 
Samsung Galaxy Tab S3
Nokia N1
Dell Inspiron 14z i5


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51


QNAP integrates Catalyst Cloud Object Storage into Hybrid Backup solution
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:40



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.