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Glurp
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  Reply # 1557654 23-May-2016 07:52
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Just to be clear, I am talking about both things, organ donation (and other body parts) as long as this can be done, then the rest for whatever use it can be put to. I am aware of the cultural taboos surrounding this, but I don't happen to share those beliefs. It seems a shame to let my remains go to waste if they can be of value in any way. I have no interest in burial, cremation, or other practices.

 

I did know that organs are only useful for donation if they are taken from a living body, but I had the impression there was other tissue, such as bone, that wasn't as critical but also had value. I was not aware that transplant organs could be donated from most hospitals so thank you for that information.

 

 

 

 





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BTR

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  Reply # 1557675 23-May-2016 08:23
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Yes this is possible, my grandfather from Chch was planning to leave his body to science, Otago Uni were going to take it however when he passed away his cause of death meant they were unable to take it.

 

The Dr at the hospital was blown away of his request and was almost in tear when he had to pass on the news that they were unable to accept his body.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1557714 23-May-2016 09:26
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Geektastic:

 

Why would anyone want to dissect embalmed bodies? I had always assumed they'd want fresh ones that presumably bore more resemblance to what they would be working on.

 

 

Well you are wrong.

 

Bodies that are used for teaching are slowly dissected over the course of the year as various parts of anatomy are taught.

 

Several weeks on the upper limb, then lower limb then pelvic structures then abdominal then retroperitoneal structures then thoracic then throat then skull then brain etc.

 

Some specimens are dissected by teachers to show particular things and they may be kept for several years.

 

After the body is donated it is embalmed for many months to ensure nothing decomposes.

 

Exposure to "live anatomy" happens during surgical training.

 

A.

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1557730 23-May-2016 09:32
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Geektastic:

 

I assume you get expelled if you get caught....it was 30 years ago, so no doubt things were more lax.

 

 

Having been there 25 years ago, I stand by my comment that it's an urban myth

 

If this happened, could you tell us the name of the person who did this or contact the police, or get your friend to do this.

 

Otherwise you are scaremongering which could cause distress to family members who might fear their relatives were treated disrespectfully.

 

 

 

A.

 

 


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  Reply # 1557784 23-May-2016 10:32
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You can be a live organ donor in NZ - kidney and (I think) partial liver donation.

 

I'm currently being assessed for live donation to a family member.  Quite intensive testing.

 

Once you are dead (or brain dead on life support), what happens to you is up to your next of kin (regardless of whether you are listed as a donor on your licence.





Mike

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  Reply # 1557791 23-May-2016 10:45
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I'd be more concerned about respect for the deceased at funeral parlours.  Nothing to go on here, apart from a recent visit to do some work in a funeral home next to the embalming room which I didn't have to enter, just a general impression gained that the business was a production line and that the areas I saw which are out of the public eye are a stark contrast to the sombre respectful atmosphere in the public areas of the building. Sample size of one doesn't say much if anything at all about the industry in general though.
Friends of mine who went to medical school in Otago or Auckland (decades ago) took the whole thing very seriously.  The closest to a sensational story I recall was about a student who turned white and dropped to the floor - probably not uncommon I guess, nor an indication that they should consider another career path. A bit of anxiety about something which may have been talked up prior, knowing the need for showing respect, added to if then feeling a bit squeamish by probably not wanting to lose face by taking a breather or whatever to get yourself together - which I expect should probably be perfectly fine if that's what you need to do.




Glurp
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  Reply # 1557822 23-May-2016 11:08
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I would like to think most people in the industry would be properly professional about it, though I'm sure there are idiots everywhere. Personally I am not bothered by a little humour or informality. I dislike all the solemnity surrounding death and would enjoy the thought of someone rearranging my skeleton to point my finger up my nose or something like that, though skipping rope with my entrails does seem a little excessive. I think it is possible to have a laugh at death without descending into vulgarity or disrespectfullness.

 

 





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Mad Scientist
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  Reply # 1557833 23-May-2016 11:15
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Geektastic:

Why would anyone want to dissect embalmed bodies? I had always assumed they'd want fresh ones that presumably bore more resemblance to what they would be working on.



Dissecting is to learn anatomy. No practising on dead bodies. Plus within a few hours flesh will start to rot. Bacteria in the gut will start it off, producing massive amount of gas as a result, causing ballooning.

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  Reply # 1557865 23-May-2016 11:28
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Understand the OP was made on Sunday, the weather was terrible and the weekend perhaps was not that brilliant for the topic starter to be in the best mood...

 

Here is an old joke to bring you back to life:

 

Mother-in-law, still in an excellent state of health, tells her son-in-law in a usual very authoritive voice:

 

- "I do not care what and how you do it, whatever it takes, but I want to be buried near the Kremlin Wall..."

 

[FYI: only very few and very honorable people are lying there in peace, so it is actually mission impossible...]

 

He comes next day with the answer:

 

- "I've managed it, was really hard, I do not care what and how you do it, but funeral is tomorrow.." :-)

 

 

 

So, if someone says, "Mate, I've managed it, but they are only accepting body donations tomorrow, but for a really, really good cause.."

 

Would you donate? :-)

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1558312 24-May-2016 00:30
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nunz:

 

biggal:

 

A family member wanted to do that but was told you have to live in Otago or Auckland to donate you body

 

but dont know about other parts

 

 

 

 

Not true - our neighbour (chch) donated to Otago School of Med.  They are appreciative of all donations as too few people donate.

 

 

 

My wife and I discussed this and will probably be leaving my body to medical science, the problem being I have so much metal in me that they'll never get the box through airport security and I'll probably be arrested for not taking off my shoes and belt and .... :)

 

 

 

 

opps I didnt read the site

 

otago

 

"The Department currently accepts bequests only from people living in the Otago, Invercargill, Canterbury and Nelson/Marlborough regions"

 

auckland

 

We typically take registrations from within an area approximately 3 hours drive from Auckland.

 

 

 

that why some one from wellington might have a problem


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  Reply # 1562663 30-May-2016 21:24
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Geektastic:

 

Why would anyone want to dissect embalmed bodies? I had always assumed they'd want fresh ones that presumably bore more resemblance to what they would be working on.

 

 

 

 

Part of the reason for embalming is to reduce the risk of disease. There is really no other reason for it, especially if you are buried within a few days of death. In fact embalming slows down decomp, not what you want to do if you bury someone.

 

Edit: Yes also preservation as mentioned - for anatomy lessons etc

 

 

 

 

 

 





nunz

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