Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
5440 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1602681 2-Aug-2016 08:44
Send private message

joker97:

 

So what happens with the people who have signed up/picked/offered to go to Mars in ?2018

 

 

That project has all but collapsed. 





____________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, use my referral code to get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


5440 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1602682 2-Aug-2016 08:47
Send private message

gzt: They live in the tunnels

 

That sounds like a great idea. 

Though i think I read the relative lack of water and oxygen on Mars make the place one huge chemical reaction waiting to happen. Human habitation requires both water and oxygen.....so corrosion and toxic gases produced by exposing Martian soils to our habitat could be a huge problem - for us.

 

We may still have to live in contained areas to prevent long-delayed, natural chemical processes from consuming our air and water. 





____________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, use my referral code to get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


 
 
 
 


18079 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1602683 2-Aug-2016 08:47
Send private message

On the ISS I think they line the outer hull with the waste on plastic bags, apparently an effective shield addition

 

I assume that you can almost endlessly recycle water as they do on the ISS, as long as you can contain it from leakage out of the ISS/Mars living craft


5440 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1602684 2-Aug-2016 08:49
Send private message

tdgeek:

 

On the ISS I think they line the outer hull with the waste on plastic bags, apparently an effective shield addition

 

I assume that you can almost endlessly recycle water as they do on the ISS, as long as you can contain it from leakage out of the ISS/Mars living craft

 

 

The ISS also obtain water from the burning of hydrogen fuel cells used for energy. Water is a by-product. Very inefficient down on Earth, but it makes sense up there.  





____________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, use my referral code to get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


5440 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1602689 2-Aug-2016 08:54
Send private message

tdgeek:

 

Exploration is good. Past base exploration, I guess its seeking other places to live, gather resources, etc. I reckon there might be another planet in the solar system worth checking out. Maybe one that needs a bit of repair first. Can't think where.....

 

 

Mars could be terraformed...sort of.....except for the lack of a magnetosphere. That's the problem anyone hoping to live there is going to have to crack. It's not just the radiation........any atmosphere we might make will just be blown away by the passing sunlight.....as has already happened on Mars.

Do we smash something big into Mars....wait 20 millions years for it to settle down...and hope the new, larger object has enough gravity and molten magnetic core?     

Or maybe a ring of nuclear generators around the planet producing a "stripe" of magnetosphere we would then build out from? There is a local magnetosphere, apparently, but it is weak and old and often below the surface of the planet. maybe we could boost that somehow.  





____________________________________________________
If you order a Tesla, use my referral code to get free stuff. 

 

My Tesla referral code: https://ts.la/steve52356


Mad Scientist
20904 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 1602690 2-Aug-2016 08:54
One person supports this post
Send private message

andrew027:

 

MikeB4: I am sure Trump will tell us he has a fix for this

 

Make Mars great again?

 

 

Definitely not. Most likely a one way ticket for everyone that he dislikes opposes him when he is President





Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


18079 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1602713 2-Aug-2016 09:49
One person supports this post
Send private message

Linuxluver:

 

tdgeek:

 

Exploration is good. Past base exploration, I guess its seeking other places to live, gather resources, etc. I reckon there might be another planet in the solar system worth checking out. Maybe one that needs a bit of repair first. Can't think where.....

 

 

Mars could be terraformed...sort of.....except for the lack of a magnetosphere. That's the problem anyone hoping to live there is going to have to crack. It's not just the radiation........any atmosphere we might make will just be blown away by the passing sunlight.....as has already happened on Mars.

Do we smash something big into Mars....wait 20 millions years for it to settle down...and hope the new, larger object has enough gravity and molten magnetic core?     

Or maybe a ring of nuclear generators around the planet producing a "stripe" of magnetosphere we would then build out from? There is a local magnetosphere, apparently, but it is weak and old and often below the surface of the planet. maybe we could boost that somehow.  

 

 

 

 

Yep, difficult, hence my post, look for a planet with a rotating core, atmosphere, water, vegetation, maybe on in need of repairs!


 
 
 
 


1382 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1602741 2-Aug-2016 10:31
Send private message

I doubt it would be possible to transform mars in any way, due to the lack of an atmosphere. The issue is that Mars being smaller than the earth does not have a large enough iron core to support a sizeable atmosphere - its the magnetism in the core (as I understand things) that keep an atmosphere in place. Without this, the solar winds would ionise what atmosphere mars did have and strip it off the planet (which is what I think might have happened).

Shielding I think is pretty well understood now, so I don't see any short term round trip having any issues. The same goes with building structures - I am sure there are current materials that will cope, and in the 21st centurary, I am sure we are able to create new ones if when needed.




Software Engineer

 


2996 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1602749 2-Aug-2016 10:48
Send private message

Fred99:

 

It is a huge issue - it's ridiculous to say it won't be.  There are people suggesting that manned mission to Mars could happen in the 2030s, yet there are only wild untested ideas to mitigate the radiation hazard - and as that paper suggests, poor understanding of the hazard.

 

 

 

 

National Radio 13 July “Boots on Mars” - That's the motto of NASA at the moment and the agency's second in charge, Dr Dava Newman, says we'll get there by the year 2039 - 70 years on from the first moon landing. Katherine Ryan interviewed Dr Newman. I got the impression that for any survivors it would be a once only trip as they would have received their lifetime safe dose of radiation. 


Lock him up!
10673 posts

Uber Geek

Lifetime subscriber

  # 1602770 2-Aug-2016 11:33
Send private message

I can't imagine many people making multiple trips to Mars with current technology, even if the radiation issue is resolved. I also disagree that Mars could not be made habitable. It doesn't have to hold onto an atmosphere for a billion years. Once the atmosphere has been re-created, which apparently is possible even with technology we already know about, a few hundred thousand years should be plenty. After that it is up to the generations that follow.

 

  





I don't think there is ever a bad time to talk about how absurd war is, how old men make decisions and young people die. - George Clooney
 




8714 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1602878 2-Aug-2016 13:21
Send private message

Bung:

 

Fred99:

 

It is a huge issue - it's ridiculous to say it won't be.  There are people suggesting that manned mission to Mars could happen in the 2030s, yet there are only wild untested ideas to mitigate the radiation hazard - and as that paper suggests, poor understanding of the hazard.

 

 

 

 

National Radio 13 July “Boots on Mars” - That's the motto of NASA at the moment and the agency's second in charge, Dr Dava Newman, says we'll get there by the year 2039 - 70 years on from the first moon landing. Katherine Ryan interviewed Dr Newman. I got the impression that for any survivors it would be a once only trip as they would have received their lifetime safe dose of radiation. 

 

 

 

 

Data I've read suggests that risk of exposure induced death (REID) from a return mars mission is about 7% (vs 3% as the accepted limit for astronauts).

 

However, I believe that's mainly derived from expectation for radiation-induced cancers - not CVD.  It's also based on expectations of a mission during solar maximum - despite higher SEP levels / risk of flares, the risks actually rise during solar minimum when flare activity is much lower, as GCR flux is higher.  That's significant for timing missions - and could be a problem if future solar cycles are as weak as the one that's just peaked (lowest in recorded history - since 1750).

 

 


5385 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1602959 2-Aug-2016 14:11
Send private message

Timing missions is bit of a weak mitigation technique.  You can time an outbound mission, but you may have to re-schedule your inbound missions due to delays, difficulties or emergencies.

 

 





Mike

1382 posts

Uber Geek


  # 1605970 7-Aug-2016 17:05
Send private message

Give it some "time" before you move it to the "travel" forum.




Software Engineer

 


18079 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  # 1606031 7-Aug-2016 19:06
Send private message

TwoSeven: I doubt it would be possible to transform mars in any way, due to the lack of an atmosphere. The issue is that Mars being smaller than the earth does not have a large enough iron core to support a sizeable atmosphere - its the magnetism in the core (as I understand things) that keep an atmosphere in place. Without this, the solar winds would ionise what atmosphere mars did have and strip it off the planet (which is what I think might have happened).

Shielding I think is pretty well understood now, so I don't see any short term round trip having any issues. The same goes with building structures - I am sure there are current materials that will cope, and in the 21st centurary, I am sure we are able to create new ones if when needed.

 

It has an iron core, but its all stopped, so no rotation and no magnetic field. I days past it had that, and flowing water and no doubt an atmosphere.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Logitech introduces new Made for Google keyboard and mouse devices
Posted 16-Oct-2019 13:36


MATTR launches to accelerate decentralised identity
Posted 16-Oct-2019 10:28


Vodafone X-Squad powers up for customers
Posted 16-Oct-2019 08:15


D Link ANZ launches EXO Smart Mesh Wi Fi Routers with McAfee protection
Posted 15-Oct-2019 11:31


Major Japanese retailer partners with smart New Zealand technology IMAGR
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:29


Ola pioneers one-time passcode feature to fight rideshare fraud
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:24


Spark Sport new home of NZC matches from 2020
Posted 10-Oct-2019 09:59


Meet Nola, Noel Leeming's new digital employee
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:07


Registrations for Sprout Accelerator open for 2020 season
Posted 4-Oct-2019 08:02


Teletrac Navman welcomes AI tech leader Jens Meggers as new President
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:41


Vodafone makes voice of 4G (VoLTE) official
Posted 4-Oct-2019 07:36


2degrees Reaches Milestone of 100,000 Broadband Customers
Posted 1-Oct-2019 09:17


Nokia 1 Plus available in New Zealand from 2nd October
Posted 30-Sep-2019 17:46


Ola integrates Apple Pay as payment method in New Zealand
Posted 25-Sep-2019 09:51


Facebook Portal to land in New Zealand
Posted 19-Sep-2019 18:35



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.