Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 


2457 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 498

Trusted

  Reply # 1721744 17-Feb-2017 12:00
One person supports this post
Send private message

BlinkyBill: Mountain/molehill. Please apply common sense.

The items are packed for delivery. If the packaging is undamaged, then the goods are fine. Totally unnecessary for the delivery packaging to be opened, every component inspected for damage, whilst the delivery guy waits. That is unreasonable.

If the goods arrive and the packaging is broken in half; don't accept delivery.

If there are important components missing then that is not a delivery issue, that is a packing issue.

People, apply common sense and be reasonable. If everyone went overboard like this for everything ...

 

The problem with this common sense approach is that not all business operate this way. Although in general, NZ consumers have protection from NZ companies that try to tie one on. That doesn't stop local business from trying to shirk their responsibilities though.

 

As another example, my daughter ordered some goods from a US based retailer. She used the cheapest shipping method (no tracking), and didn't opt for their "shipping insurance". The last status update indicated that her goods arrived in New Zealand December 27th, but the parcel never arrived here.

As the sender, the retailer is the only one who can lodge an investigation with their shipper into what happened to this parcel. But they are steadfastly refusing to do so, because she didn't opt for the shipping insurance. I've even confirmed with New Zealand Post that the correct course to escalate this is for the retailer to do this, regardless of shipping method chosen. But they still steadfastly refuse. Instead they have offered her 25% of the order's value as store credit, to be used towards a future order. Which we will be declining.

So in my original case, if components were missing or damaged a retailer operating in a country with lesser consumer protection laws may refer to the email text as a way to dodge their obligations to the consumer. I'm reasonably confident that can't happen in New Zealand, but as always there's room to be educated on this. Hence this thread.

 

 


467 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 101


  Reply # 1721825 17-Feb-2017 13:26
Send private message

At work we sign all courier dockets to include the phrase "subject to inspection"
Covers us for hidden damage we might not see.

 

 

 

As far as them trying to contract out the CGA - sound more likely that they want to be able to blame to courier company for damaged in transit if required.

 

Since they  can't actually contract out the CGA there is no issue here for you.


 
 
 
 


13110 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1535


  Reply # 1721868 17-Feb-2017 15:15
Send private message

I hate how companies try this on, as it is trying to put all responsibility on the buyer. I ALWAYS sign any courier delivered goods as NOT EXAMINED. I have never had a courier say you can't do that. If they did, I would say that I would need time to examine it, and would they wait why I did this. Although in the past I did do this once and it took 30 minutes to check everything while the courier waited for, it was for something that had been previously damaged, but I doubt they would wait that these days. Often couriers will drop of the goods anyway and not get a signature or someone else may sign for it, and not the buyer that agreed to the contract anyway.


2953 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1064


  Reply # 1721901 17-Feb-2017 16:05
Send private message

I just got a mental picture of a courier driver hopping from foot to foot while you count dowel pins!





Mike

48 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 6


  Reply # 1722162 18-Feb-2017 11:17
Send private message

KrazyKid:

 

At work we sign all courier dockets to include the phrase "subject to inspection"
Covers us for hidden damage we might not see.

 

 

 

^^ This ^^

 

 

 

STI (subject to inspection) has been the go to annotation on courier packages that can't be inspected in a timely fashion (ie, while the courier stands around waiting), for as long as I can remember.

 

We would get pallets of electronic equipment delivered in one go, and there was not much more you could do than a quick walk around to make sure there were no obvious signs of damage, e.g. forklift blades obviously penetrated the packaging, or clear signs the pallet had been dropped.

 

So we would always sign the delivery docket with "STI" to make it clear that we would come back to the courier/freight company if inspection showed damage when opened (within a reasonable time or delivery, might be pushing it to complain several weeks later)


20183 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3782

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1722175 18-Feb-2017 11:28
Send private message

Having dealt with this before, you are only signing that the external condition of the parcel is intact. No dents from dropping, no crushing, no holes in the side etc.

 

If something is broken inside and the external is ok, its usually either insufficient packaging or else it was packed already broken. Too many local places do not properly pack things and just put courier tickets on the side of retail packaging which they wrap up in brown paper and similar. That is not a courier problem if it arrives broken inside since that is not well enough packed.





Richard rich.ms

112 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 39


  Reply # 1722192 18-Feb-2017 12:48
One person supports this post
Send private message

BlinkyBill: Mountain/molehill. Please apply common sense.

The items are packed for delivery. If the packaging is undamaged, then the goods are fine. Totally unnecessary for the delivery packaging to be opened, every component inspected for damage, whilst the delivery guy waits. That is unreasonable.

If the goods arrive and the packaging is broken in half; don't accept delivery.

If there are important components missing then that is not a delivery issue, that is a packing issue.

People, apply common sense and be reasonable. If everyone went overboard like this for everything ...

 

Must disagree as I had exactly this scenario with two pantry units (already assembled) where the packaging was totally undamaged but both units had the backs bashed in - probably from mishandling. So annotating with 'subject to inspection' is a must for me.


13110 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1535


  Reply # 1722254 18-Feb-2017 14:26
Send private message

richms:

Having dealt with this before, you are only signing that the external condition of the parcel is intact. No dents from dropping, no crushing, no holes in the side etc.


If something is broken inside and the external is ok, its usually either insufficient packaging or else it was packed already broken. Too many local places do not properly pack things and just put courier tickets on the side of retail packaging which they wrap up in brown paper and similar. That is not a courier problem if it arrives broken inside since that is not well enough packed.



The problem with that is often the outer packaging is damaged, but the goods inside are perfectly fine

13110 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1535


  Reply # 1722255 18-Feb-2017 14:29
One person supports this post
Send private message

muttley68:

KrazyKid:


At work we sign all courier dockets to include the phrase "subject to inspection"
Covers us for hidden damage we might not see.


 


^^ This ^^


 


STI (subject to inspection) has been the go to annotation on courier packages that can't be inspected in a timely fashion (ie, while the courier stands around waiting), for as long as I can remember.


We would get pallets of electronic equipment delivered in one go, and there was not much more you could do than a quick walk around to make sure there were no obvious signs of damage, e.g. forklift blades obviously penetrated the packaging, or clear signs the pallet had been dropped.


So we would always sign the delivery docket with "STI" to make it clear that we would come back to the courier/freight company if inspection showed damage when opened (within a reasonable time or delivery, might be pushing it to complain several weeks later)



The problem with using an acronym like that is that the courier could dispute not knowing what that means, or they may have thought you were signing your initials. STI stands for several things. So imo it is better to write the words so there is no confusion.

20183 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3782

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1722294 18-Feb-2017 15:48
Send private message

mattwnz:
The problem with that is often the outer packaging is damaged, but the goods inside are perfectly fine

 

Then you make them wait to check it out. Proper packaging _should_ survive normal courier handling, but most NZ companies have no clue how to do that, when compared to the likes of amazon where everything is double boxed with ample room around it.





Richard rich.ms

1203 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 132


  Reply # 1722852 20-Feb-2017 02:06
Send private message

I would say that the vendor is in violation of the Fair trading act, section 13, paragraph i




---
James Sleeman
I sell lots of stuff for electronic enthusiasts...


45 posts

Geek
+1 received by user: 5


  Reply # 1722856 20-Feb-2017 07:09
Send private message

BlinkyBill: Mountain/molehill. Please apply common sense.

The items are packed for delivery. If the packaging is undamaged, then the goods are fine. Totally unnecessary for the delivery packaging to be opened, every component inspected for damage, whilst the delivery guy waits. That is unreasonable.

If the goods arrive and the packaging is broken in half; don't accept delivery.

If there are important components missing then that is not a delivery issue, that is a packing issue.

People, apply common sense and be reasonable. If everyone went overboard like this for everything ...

 

 

 

The fact the selling company is actually posting this message shows they have no knowledge of the CGA law or they do have the knowledge but are trying to deceive their customers.

 

Therefore it is not worth the risk for the customer to apply common sense here, since they are clearly dealing with an ignorant and\or arrogant business which cannot be trusted.




2457 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 498

Trusted

  Reply # 1723436 21-Feb-2017 08:07
One person supports this post
Send private message

So as it turns out, this tale has a final chapter. :-)

 

When pulling out all the pieces for assembly on Saturday, I noticed there was some minor damage to the top piece (it's a TV cabinet). 

 

I contacted Urban Sales (> 24 hours after receiving the goods, which were not inspected on delivery). They promptly replied with an apology, and told me they'd investigate. This morning I received an email confirming that this would've probably happened in transit, as they inspect everything before it is sent out. As restitution they offered a partial refund, which we accepted.

 

In summary, despite the disclaimer in their shipping notification email and on their website, Urban Sales let common sense and good customer service prevail. I would not hesitate to recommend them to anyone looking for a NZ supplier of IKEA furniture.


1 | 2 
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Symantec protects data everywhere with Information Centric Security
Posted 21-Sep-2017 15:33


FUJIFILM introduces X-E3 mirrorless camera with wireless connectivity
Posted 18-Sep-2017 13:53


Vodafone announces new plans with bigger data bundles
Posted 15-Sep-2017 10:51


Skinny launches phone with support for te reo Maori
Posted 14-Sep-2017 08:39


If Vodafone dropping mail worries you, you’re doing online wrong
Posted 11-Sep-2017 13:54


Vodafone New Zealand deploy live 400 gigabit system
Posted 11-Sep-2017 11:07


OPPO camera phones now available at PB Tech
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:56


Norton Wi-Fi Privacy — Easy, flawed VPN
Posted 11-Sep-2017 09:48


Lenovo reveals new ThinkPad A Series
Posted 8-Sep-2017 14:37


Huawei passes Apple for the first time to capture the second spot globally
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:45


Vodafone initiative enhances te reo Maori pronunciation on Google Maps
Posted 8-Sep-2017 10:40


Voyager Internet expand local internet phone services company with Conversant acquisition
Posted 6-Sep-2017 18:27


NOW Expands in to Tauranga
Posted 5-Sep-2017 18:16


Windows 10 Fall Creators Update coming Oct. 17
Posted 4-Sep-2017 14:10


Garmin introduce Garmin vivoactive 3
Posted 1-Sep-2017 18:38



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.