Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
810 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 191
Inactive user


  # 1767385 19-Apr-2017 14:45
Send private message

CCC aren't making a profit, fares account for roughly half running costs (if they've met their mandated quota, I don't know if they have). They aren't allowed to dip below 50% funded by fares, that's a national limit that applies to all regions btw. If you want higher funding from tax/rates it'll mean voting out National to (hopefully) lower that limit - which brings us nicely back to OPs position.

16622 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3278

Trusted

  # 1767392 19-Apr-2017 14:58
2 people support this post
Send private message

 It does. Thread concluded as nothing will change. As Joker97 said, it will take 5 years to decide, 5 years to design, and so on, which equates to nothing. The populous will evolve, and congregate where it is easier to do so, and work where it is easier should those options exist. Hence we will have that space, where we choose, and flag the CBD, which will need renaming to BD


 
 
 
 


2691 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 768


  # 1767450 19-Apr-2017 16:44
2 people support this post
Send private message

nickb800:

 

Paul1977:

 

I live in Christchurch, and the public transport is a joke. And now they seem to be trying to make the CBD is unfriendly to cars as possible, while offering no suitable alternative.

 

Until public transport is fast and convenient then I'll be sticking to my car, and avoiding the CBD. I'd wager the majority of Christchurch residents will do the same.

 

 

How are they making the CBD unfriendly to cars? Most of the roadworks under the accessible city project are effectively fixing earthquake/rebuild damaged roads, and keeping the same number of motor vehicle lanes. The council has spent the best part of $100m rebuilding the Lichfield St carpark and subsidising The Crossing carpark.

 

Here's a novel thought - *everyone* is a pedestrian at some point in their journey - you can't drive your car to your desk at work, to a table at a restaurant, or the checkout counter in a shop. Making the city more pleasant for pedestrians is making it more pleasant for everyone. Who enjoyed walking down the side of the one-way streets pre-quake with several lanes of traffic zooming past at 50kmh?

 

What is changing is the provision of on-street parking, which is being reduced to provide for the safety and convenience of other transport modes. The point isn't to make everyone bike/walk/bus, just a few people that can conveniently do so, therefore reducing congestion for everyone - including single occupant motor vehicles.

 

Let's keep it in perspective. It is still possible to get free on-street all-day parking within 10mins walk of the core CBD. Heck, I drove to work towing a trailer and parked on street for free on a weekday. If a 10min walk from a free carpark is too much, then there are ample choices of $5 per day workday parking, which for a city of our size is ridiculously cheap. Wellington is more like $15+, and Auckland $20+

 

 

The worst part is the lack of convenient parking (and I don't mean the expensive gravel pits that Wilsons call carparks). But also narrowing many of the roads in order to accommodate ridiculously wide footpaths. And don't even get me started on the 30kph speed limit.

 

I don't work in town, so my visits would almost exclusively be in the weekend - and it always seems to be a nightmare to find a convenient park.

 

Perhaps things will be better once it is all finished, but who knows when that will be.

 

There are plenty of arguments for both sides, but my own personal experiences have left me wanting to avoid the CBD unless absolutely necessary. It seems like an absolute cluster-fudge to me.


16622 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 3278

Trusted

  # 1767545 19-Apr-2017 20:07
One person supports this post
Send private message

Paul1977:

 

nickb800:

 

Paul1977:

 

I live in Christchurch, and the public transport is a joke. And now they seem to be trying to make the CBD is unfriendly to cars as possible, while offering no suitable alternative.

 

Until public transport is fast and convenient then I'll be sticking to my car, and avoiding the CBD. I'd wager the majority of Christchurch residents will do the same.

 

 

How are they making the CBD unfriendly to cars? Most of the roadworks under the accessible city project are effectively fixing earthquake/rebuild damaged roads, and keeping the same number of motor vehicle lanes. The council has spent the best part of $100m rebuilding the Lichfield St carpark and subsidising The Crossing carpark.

 

Here's a novel thought - *everyone* is a pedestrian at some point in their journey - you can't drive your car to your desk at work, to a table at a restaurant, or the checkout counter in a shop. Making the city more pleasant for pedestrians is making it more pleasant for everyone. Who enjoyed walking down the side of the one-way streets pre-quake with several lanes of traffic zooming past at 50kmh?

 

What is changing is the provision of on-street parking, which is being reduced to provide for the safety and convenience of other transport modes. The point isn't to make everyone bike/walk/bus, just a few people that can conveniently do so, therefore reducing congestion for everyone - including single occupant motor vehicles.

 

Let's keep it in perspective. It is still possible to get free on-street all-day parking within 10mins walk of the core CBD. Heck, I drove to work towing a trailer and parked on street for free on a weekday. If a 10min walk from a free carpark is too much, then there are ample choices of $5 per day workday parking, which for a city of our size is ridiculously cheap. Wellington is more like $15+, and Auckland $20+

 

 

The worst part is the lack of convenient parking (and I don't mean the expensive gravel pits that Wilsons call carparks). But also narrowing many of the roads in order to accommodate ridiculously wide footpaths. And don't even get me started on the 30kph speed limit.

 

I don't work in town, so my visits would almost exclusively be in the weekend - and it always seems to be a nightmare to find a convenient park.

 

Perhaps things will be better once it is all finished, but who knows when that will be.

 

There are plenty of arguments for both sides, but my own personal experiences have left me wanting to avoid the CBD unless absolutely necessary. It seems like an absolute cluster-fudge to me.

 

 

Whats everyones thoughts on pre EQ CBD compared to now? I worked there, it was normal. I rarely now go to CBD as I worked in various burbs and now at home. There were 50,000 working there, obviously less now. Wilsons custom designed quarries still exist, so at the moment, parking shouldn't be an issue? 

 

My personal opinion which is close to Rikkitic's, is to make Cashel to Gloucester (S-N) and Avon River to Manchester (W-E) all pedestrian. But you would need to provide good parking for people to go there. One day, Public Transport may rule, but not now. 

 

Public Transport wise, it seems to me that theres no innovative thinking. Trams, why not? They are light-light rail more or less. In ChCh CBD you cannot widen streets. But you can re use roads, narrow some a tad, remove some, build there. Add mini parks, mini pond, kids playground, qualified supervision of that. Family environment to take kids, shop, play, cafe, bars. Pop a Westfield type mall somewhere. 

 

Breath of fresh air. 

 

 


1356 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 163


  # 1767861 20-Apr-2017 12:36
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

shk292:

 

I think you're dreaming if you think there will be fewer provate cars in NZ within 10-20 years.  Kiwis (or at least the ones who don't live in inner-city apartments and wish they were Scandinavian) like to do things like towing boats to the beach, going surfing, taking the family plus dog plus a whole heap of gear on holiday, driving to a mate's farm to go hunting, going to the DIY store to bring back a load of stuff to do up their house etc, etc etc.  Plus, a city like ChCh doesn't have (or probably want) the population density to make decent mass transport cost effective.  The only thing excluding cars from inner cities will achieve is making those areas solely used by the inner-city hipsters that live there.

 

 

As the country fills up, these things will change. You can't live in the 1950s forever. 

 

I don't doubt that some people will continue to need cars, or will have them for road trips, but they will cease to be necessary or desirable for urban living and cities will no longer be designed around them. This is already the case in some parts of Europe.

 

 

 

I think that is quite a utopian view of things.  I might also point out that much of the European road system was initially constructed nearly 2000 years ago and has had quite a bit of time to be improved and expanded.

 

I think cities can be considered amorphous entities and the populations tend to ebb and flow from one side to another (or into and out of) them each day.  Also, one has to consider that cities are full of people of different ages, cultures, needs and wants, so a good urban design I think for the inside of a town and city needs to cater for all of this - that means  motor/electric vehicle, cycle, rail and the like.  While technology my shape the type of transport in the future, the need for flexibility I think will likely mean that person transport will be around for a while.

 

Another issue I think is important is to think about developing the commuter belt around each town and city.  The ability to live on the outskirts of a city where accommodation is cheaper and potentially more available and still be able to get into or across the city for work purposes is just as important as developing the internal infrastructure.   Again rail, motor/electric and potentially cycle is important, but the structure and cost is different.

 

Finally, expanding that even further is the ability to efficiently travel into the city from outlying areas and from other towns and cities - again, the price of accommodation is a factor but it also means that people are able to travel into and out of the city for work and leisure which can often reduce the reliance of having to centralise everything in one place.

 

 





Software Engineer

 


bmt

469 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 153


  # 1768267 21-Apr-2017 08:48
2 people support this post
Send private message

http://thespinoff.co.nz/society/18-04-2017/parking-nightmare-how-the-car-lobby-is-hijacking-the-christchurch-cbd-rebuild/




Fat bottom Trump
10075 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4943

Subscriber

  # 1768308 21-Apr-2017 09:47
Send private message

bmt:

 

http://thespinoff.co.nz/society/18-04-2017/parking-nightmare-how-the-car-lobby-is-hijacking-the-christchurch-cbd-rebuild/

 

 

Perhaps those who so strenuously objected to my satirical poke at the Minister will cast their discerning approval on this piece, which pretty much says the same thing I tried to, but does it much better. Perhaps it is also worth pointing out that my original post has in fact succeeded quite well at provoking a serious discussion of this subject, so mocking Brownlee's appetite and exercise regime may have served a purpose after all.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


 
 
 
 


2691 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 768


  # 1768310 21-Apr-2017 09:48
Send private message

tdgeek:

 

 

 

Whats everyones thoughts on pre EQ CBD compared to now? I worked there, it was normal. I rarely now go to CBD as I worked in various burbs and now at home. There were 50,000 working there, obviously less now. Wilsons custom designed quarries still exist, so at the moment, parking shouldn't be an issue? 

 

My personal opinion which is close to Rikkitic's, is to make Cashel to Gloucester (S-N) and Avon River to Manchester (W-E) all pedestrian. But you would need to provide good parking for people to go there. One day, Public Transport may rule, but not now. 

 

Public Transport wise, it seems to me that theres no innovative thinking. Trams, why not? They are light-light rail more or less. In ChCh CBD you cannot widen streets. But you can re use roads, narrow some a tad, remove some, build there. Add mini parks, mini pond, kids playground, qualified supervision of that. Family environment to take kids, shop, play, cafe, bars. Pop a Westfield type mall somewhere. 

 

Breath of fresh air. 

 

 

Maybe I'm a snob; but I take issue with paying a quite high rate to park in a dusty, stony, potholed vacant lot. The all-day parking rates might be alright, but Wilsons are quite expensive for shorter times.

 

EDIT: With Wilsons, I feel like I am paying a premium price for a very budget product/service.


BTR

1512 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 459


  # 1769511 24-Apr-2017 09:10
Send private message

1. You are obviously not from Christchurch and have never tried to find a carpark while attempting to make a hospital appointment there.

 

2. eCan aren't even interested in getting cars of the right to reduce congestion on our northern motorway, their solution is add more buses which are just going to sit in the same congestion when residents have been asking for a light rail service and keep being told no 10M is to expensive for light rail.

 

3. Most CCC parking buildings were damaged in the quakes and closed or pulled down, Wilson parking popped up everywhere but boy are they taking advantage and charging a fortune. As a result I now only travel into the city for work.


13967 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6728

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1769534 24-Apr-2017 10:16
Send private message

Paul1977:

 

tdgeek:

 

 

 

Whats everyones thoughts on pre EQ CBD compared to now? I worked there, it was normal. I rarely now go to CBD as I worked in various burbs and now at home. There were 50,000 working there, obviously less now. Wilsons custom designed quarries still exist, so at the moment, parking shouldn't be an issue? 

 

My personal opinion which is close to Rikkitic's, is to make Cashel to Gloucester (S-N) and Avon River to Manchester (W-E) all pedestrian. But you would need to provide good parking for people to go there. One day, Public Transport may rule, but not now. 

 

Public Transport wise, it seems to me that theres no innovative thinking. Trams, why not? They are light-light rail more or less. In ChCh CBD you cannot widen streets. But you can re use roads, narrow some a tad, remove some, build there. Add mini parks, mini pond, kids playground, qualified supervision of that. Family environment to take kids, shop, play, cafe, bars. Pop a Westfield type mall somewhere. 

 

Breath of fresh air. 

 

 

Maybe I'm a snob; but I take issue with paying a quite high rate to park in a dusty, stony, potholed vacant lot. The all-day parking rates might be alright, but Wilsons are quite expensive for shorter times.

 

EDIT: With Wilsons, I feel like I am paying a premium price for a very budget product/service.

 

 

 

 

Trying to get out of a Wilson parking lot in a wheel chair is like trying to ride over a river bank.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

Using empathy takes no energy and can gain so much. Try it.

 

 


13967 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6728

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1769535 24-Apr-2017 10:17
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

bmt:

 

http://thespinoff.co.nz/society/18-04-2017/parking-nightmare-how-the-car-lobby-is-hijacking-the-christchurch-cbd-rebuild/

 

 

Perhaps those who so strenuously objected to my satirical poke at the Minister will cast their discerning approval on this piece, which pretty much says the same thing I tried to, but does it much better. Perhaps it is also worth pointing out that my original post has in fact succeeded quite well at provoking a serious discussion of this subject, so mocking Brownlee's appetite and exercise regime may have served a purpose after all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Argue the points not the person. Mr Brownlees size has zero relevance to the topic.  





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

Using empathy takes no energy and can gain so much. Try it.

 

 




Fat bottom Trump
10075 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4943

Subscriber

  # 1769563 24-Apr-2017 10:34
Send private message

Honestly Mike, if the many excellent satirical TV shows America is so rich in, like Saturday Night Live, only argued the points and not the person, they would be pretty dreary affairs. I am in no way comparing my wit to theirs, just saying there may be a valid reason for exaggerating the physical characteristics of someone like Sean Spicer or Donald Trump in order to make a point. This is a legitimate device to use.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


13967 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 6728

Trusted
Subscriber

  # 1769834 24-Apr-2017 15:29
Send private message

Rikkitic:

 

Honestly Mike, if the many excellent satirical TV shows America is so rich in, like Saturday Night Live, only argued the points and not the person, they would be pretty dreary affairs. I am in no way comparing my wit to theirs, just saying there may be a valid reason for exaggerating the physical characteristics of someone like Sean Spicer or Donald Trump in order to make a point. This is a legitimate device to use.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A TV personality does not make it right. It is the same as denigrating someone because of age, race, creed, disability, hair colour, gender, sexual preference  etc. all equally offensive.





Mike
Retired IT Manager. 
The views stated in my posts are my personal views and not that of any other organisation.

 

Using empathy takes no energy and can gain so much. Try it.

 

 




Fat bottom Trump
10075 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 4943

Subscriber

  # 1769853 24-Apr-2017 15:51
Send private message

I agree with you in the case of private people. Politicians are another matter and are fair game for ridicule. If they can't handle it they have no business being in politics.

 

Brownlee is clearly overweight, some would say grossly so. Maybe he can't help it. But pointing that out in the context of him complaining about not being able to drive right up to some place for lunch, as if that is the worst possible thing in the world, is a completely legitimate use of caricature for the purpose of satire. I see no need to apologise for it.

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


bmt

469 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 153


  # 1770103 25-Apr-2017 10:08
Send private message

This isn't really a line of discussion this thread should be going down.. But now Brownlee is the new Foreign Minister, our senior diplomat and for all intents and purposes our main representative on the world stage - well, there is no denying he is grossly obese, and I am embarrassed by him representing New Zealand. As a member of the NZDF while he was Minister of Defence I was similarly embarrassed - extendable seatbelts on flights, ill fitting lifejackets and "flak jackets" etc..

 

As for Wilsons, there is a simple solution if you don't appreciate the "service" they are offering. Basic economics would suggest they see no need to improve their parking lots, so unless people stop using them nothing will change. They aren't a government or council service so have no obligation to people, just themselves.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Xero announces new smarter tools, push into the North American market
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:20


New report by Unisys shows New Zealanders want action by social platform companies and police to monitor social media sites
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:09


ASB adds Google Pay option to contactless payments
Posted 19-Jun-2019 17:05


New Zealand PC Market declines on the back of high channel inventory, IDC reports
Posted 18-Jun-2019 17:35


Air New Zealand uses drones to inspect aircraft
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:39


TCL Electronics launches its first-ever 8K TV
Posted 17-Jun-2019 15:18


E-scooter share scheme launches in Wellington
Posted 17-Jun-2019 12:34


Anyone can broadcast with Kordia Pop Up TV
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:51


Volvo and Uber present production vehicle ready for self-driving
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:47


100,000 customers connected to fibre broadband network through Enable
Posted 13-Jun-2019 10:35


5G uptake even faster than expected
Posted 12-Jun-2019 10:01


Xbox showcases 60 anticipated games
Posted 10-Jun-2019 20:24


Trend Micro Turns Public Hotspots into Secure Networks with WiFi Protection for Mobile Devices
Posted 5-Jun-2019 13:24


Bold UK spinoff for beauty software company Flossie
Posted 2-Jun-2019 14:10


Amazon Introduces Echo Show 5
Posted 1-Jun-2019 15:32



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.