Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
5014 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2294


  Reply # 1845238 11-Aug-2017 14:51
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

dafman:

 

Once we start charging dairy farmers a fair price for their water use and environmental damage, the milk will taste a way better. IMHO.

 

 

Your taste buds seem to be fine-tuned for bitterness.


9812 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2983

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1845241 11-Aug-2017 14:54
Send private message quote this post

MikeB4:

 

surfisup1000:

 

Geektastic:

 

I drank milk delivered daily in glass bottles more or less until I moved here.

 

It never went off except when left on the doorstep for too long because I was away and forgot to cancel the milkman.

 

Whilst I doubt light does milk much good (it certainly turns butter rancid quickly) over long exposure times, I would think most people drink it fast enough that it isn't likely to be an issue.

 

 

I don't like 'off milk', I sometimes wonder if I have some extra sense of taste as some people don't seem to mind it.

 

I can taste when cafe's use off milk in their coffee. Our 'Z' station uses the transparent milk bottles and their coffees are disgusting.  I never buy from there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

All coffee North of Wellington is disgusting tongue-outinnocent

 

 

 

now where can I hide? 

 

 

 

 

Does that include Italy?






 
 
 
 


1563 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 248

Trusted

Reply # 1845243 11-Aug-2017 14:54
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

Coil:

 

Clearly you haven't come around to my house in the lovely North Auckland suburb of Devonport and sampled one of my Chai Soy Decaf Latte's with one raw sugar and cinnamon on top.

 

 

How can that be coffee in any sense of the word ? No real coffee, and no real milk.tongue-out





My thoughts are no longer my own and is probably representative of our media-controlled government


9812 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2983

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1845245 11-Aug-2017 14:58
Send private message quote this post

surfisup1000:

 

Geektastic:

 

I drank milk delivered daily in glass bottles more or less until I moved here.

 

It never went off except when left on the doorstep for too long because I was away and forgot to cancel the milkman.

 

Whilst I doubt light does milk much good (it certainly turns butter rancid quickly) over long exposure times, I would think most people drink it fast enough that it isn't likely to be an issue.

 

 

I don't like 'off milk', I sometimes wonder if I have some extra sense of taste as some people don't seem to mind it.

 

I can taste when cafe's use off milk in their coffee. Our 'Z' station uses the transparent milk bottles and their coffees are disgusting.  I never buy from there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I agree. I have very sensitive taste buds - any presence of things I do not like will be immediately detected, even if it is residue off a knife or cutting board, for example, of onion, cucumber, tomato etc.

 

I cannot drink off milk. Consequently I cannot eat yoghurt which is milk that has been made to go off deliberately.






5014 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 2294


  Reply # 1845259 11-Aug-2017 15:14
Send private message quote this post

SepticSceptic:

 

Coil:

 

Clearly you haven't come around to my house in the lovely North Auckland suburb of Devonport and sampled one of my Chai Soy Decaf Latte's with one raw sugar and cinnamon on top.

 

 

How can that be coffee in any sense of the word ? No real coffee, and no real milk.tongue-out

 

 

Might be tolerable with a couple of shots of rum in it - but I'm guessing the best you could expect is a couple of drops of Hansells alcohol-free rum essence


94 posts

Master Geek
+1 received by user: 59


  Reply # 1845261 11-Aug-2017 15:21
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Milk doesn't last long enough in our house to go off. However I always hunt to the back of the fridge in store to pick up the bottle with an extra 2/3 days of remaining shelf life.


670 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 404


  Reply # 1845278 11-Aug-2017 16:00
Send private message quote this post

Geektastic:

 

 

 

I cannot drink off milk. Consequently I cannot eat yoghurt which is milk that has been made to go off deliberately.

 

 

Reminds me of story from about 8 years ago. We're sitting in the lunchroom of a boutique south island dairy factory where we were doing a plant upgrade and a couple of their cheesemakers were sitting at the table discussing the art of cheesemaking. One of our installers who's a bit of a character finishes his lunch and stands up and says "Any idiot can make milk rot!" and walks off.





"War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."
- John Stuart Mill


13239 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1567


  Reply # 1845280 11-Aug-2017 16:02
Send private message quote this post

cadman:

 

mattwnz:
Permeate isn't milk though, I believe it is a byproduct of processed milk products. Eg if you put runny homemade yogurt in a fine cloth to sieve it to make the yogurt more solid,, the yellow liquid that comes out I believe is permeate, which you then normally throw out. People supposedly want a standardised taste all the year round, so that is why it is added in.

 

Permeate isn't a by-product - it's simply part of the milk in the first place that is separated with ultrafiltration. Your analogy is false - in NZ we use milk permeate to standardise milk - not permeate from milk products. You only discard the filtered homemade yogurt permeate because you are just making yogurt not because there's anything actually wrong with it.

 

 

 

 

This article says it is a 'by-product' https://www.endeavour.edu.au/wellspring-blog/nutrition/the-real-story-behind-permeate-free-milk

 

 

 

What is milk permeate?

 

Permeate is a by-product of dairy foods produced in the making of whey protein concentrate, cream and cheese. It consists of lactose (milk sugar), vitamins and minerals. It is often added to milk to standardise its nutritional composition and taste, which naturally fluctuates with the seasons.

 

 

 

Milk Cheese, Yogurt etc is all essentially just milk with no other additives, it all comes down to processing. If they are making it from milk directly, then wouldn't the  milk solids would be the primary product and the permeate would be the by-product?  I don't think is is a bad thing that it is added, and also reduced waste. Also maybe milk is cheaper as a result?


911 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 319

Subscriber

  Reply # 1845283 11-Aug-2017 16:14
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

There's a lot of crap printed about permeate - it reminds me of discussions about vaccines and cellphone towers.

 

The one I hear often is that permeate modified milk is somehow 'watered down'. Nonsense.

 

Permeate added back to milk is extracted from milk by ultrafiltration. It is not some waste squeezed out of a cheese vat.

 

Nothing wrong with NZ milk with or without permeate, but the latter will have variable nutritional composition due to the variability of nature and cows. 


1433 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 255

Subscriber

  Reply # 1845303 11-Aug-2017 17:18
2 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

I've done work in the bottling plant at Takanini, the difference between the Fonterra branded milk and the supermarket branded milk...................the bottle, exactly the same product, just a package change.


13239 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1567


  Reply # 1845307 11-Aug-2017 17:32
Send private message quote this post

kryptonjohn:

 

 

 

Permeate added back to milk is extracted from milk by ultrafiltration. It is not some waste squeezed out of a cheese vat.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the product that is filtered out though?  eg when you filter something you get a product on either side of the filter. One is the by-product, and one is the product you were trying improve or get from it. 


911 posts

Ultimate Geek
+1 received by user: 319

Subscriber

  Reply # 1845317 11-Aug-2017 18:01
Send private message quote this post

Permeate is filtered out, along with anything else that doesn't pass through.


1287 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 71

Subscriber

  Reply # 1845318 11-Aug-2017 18:02
Send private message quote this post

Ive always thought the light proof bottle was more about getting manufacturing overheads down. The way I see it, the 'opac' bottles would cost more to make vs a 'dirty recycled bottle that they just need to add white colour to'.  I could be wrong, but makes sense. 

 

 

 

 


13239 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 1567


  Reply # 1845319 11-Aug-2017 18:15
Send private message quote this post

kryptonjohn:

 

Permeate is filtered out, along with anything else that doesn't pass through.

 

 

 

 

So what are the products that are produced? Is it Milk solids, which are the premium product, and by-product is the permeate? Or is it the other way around.


1948 posts

Uber Geek
+1 received by user: 868

Trusted
Subscriber

  Reply # 1845321 11-Aug-2017 18:24
Send private message quote this post

Just on TV one now, Consumer NZ says milk from light proof bottles has no nutritional benefit over other bottles.

 

Yet, a Fonterra spin doctor fronts up and says they reckon it's worth charging consumers a premium for!

 

Dairy is wrecking our environment and killing our waterways (honest opinion) ... and now Fonterra are using marketing spin to ramp up the price of milk for the consumer!

 

It's time for change! Let's start charging them a little for their massive water use to begin with.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter »

Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

Vocus New Zealand on the block as Aussies bail
Posted 23-Oct-2017 17:06


Vodafone TV — television in the cloud
Posted 17-Oct-2017 19:29


Nokia 8 review: Classy midrange pure Android phone
Posted 16-Oct-2017 07:27


Why carriers might want to embrace Commerce Commission study, MVNOs
Posted 13-Oct-2017 09:42


Fitbit launches Ionic, its health and fitness smartwatch
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:52


Xero launches machine learning automation to improve coding accuracy for small businesses
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:45


Bank of New Zealand uses Intel AI to detect financial crime
Posted 12-Oct-2017 15:39


Sony launches Xperia XZ1, a smartphone with real-time 3D capture
Posted 11-Oct-2017 10:26


Notes on Nokia’s phone comeback
Posted 10-Oct-2017 10:06


Air New Zealand begins Inflight Wi-Fi rollout
Posted 9-Oct-2017 20:16


The latest mobile phones in perspective
Posted 9-Oct-2017 18:34


Review: Acronis True Image 2018 — serious backup
Posted 8-Oct-2017 11:22


Lenovo launches ThinkPad Anniversary Edition 25
Posted 7-Oct-2017 23:16


Less fone, more tech as Vodafone gets brand make-over
Posted 6-Oct-2017 08:16


API Talent Achieves AWS MSP Partner Status
Posted 5-Oct-2017 21:20



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.