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  Reply # 1850052 21-Aug-2017 22:29
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He probably meant a Financial Advisor.





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  Reply # 1850064 21-Aug-2017 22:59
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sonyxperiageek:

 

 

 

 

 The big 4 banks seem to have some of the best TD rates at the moment for 12 months and under.

 

I would also look at credit ratings and the size of bank. As it looks like we are moving to more uncertain times,and there is potentially a big property bubble, and we haven't had a recession for ages, and we are now 10 years from the GFC. If things to to crap, you don't want to lose money, or not be able to get your money out. We do have the OBR if a bank does fail, which supposedly will mean that people with deposits in a bank could take a haircut.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1850083 22-Aug-2017 01:30
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mattwnz:

 

We do have the OBR if a bank does fail, which supposedly will mean that people with deposits in a bank could take a haircut.

 

 

I think that if things got so bad that Term Deposit holders had to take a haircut, investors with shares and bonds, ETF's etc would have already have been terminally scalped or at least had a full head-shave.

 

I have a degree in Economics, then a second degree in Accounting and was a registered Chartered Accountant for 35 years (although I never actually worked as a CA). In the early 2000's I studied four years part-time at Uni and became a govt-registered Authorised Financial Adviser.

 

Now that I'm retired, what do I invest in? TD's and more TD'S - maybe a bit lazy but it's simple, safe and I sleep well at night.

 

However peoples' risk/return profiles depend a lot on what stage they are in their financial life-cycle. A properly-advised diversified investment plan and portfolio can be a great thing for people who are young enough to ride out one or more economic cycles.

 

Best approach IMO is to get professional advice if you're thinking of investing - as mentioned by several posters above.

 

 


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  Reply # 1850115 22-Aug-2017 05:26
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Kiwifruta:

BlinkyBill: Best personal investments for best returns, ranked in terms of risk (i.e. best return, highest risk), assuming long-term best position is the target outcome (i.e. not a gamble):
1. Own business
2. Picking stocks
3. Paying off personal debt especially mortgage
4. Aggressive funds via fund manager
5. Passive funds or etf's

It is silly to write off property, consider the tax advantages from capital gains.

Don't take financial advice from me or any other person, get reputable professional advice. If you do #1 or #2 get accountancy advice.


 


How would an accountant help with #2?


They are trained in tax and some financial management, not investing. Investment is in the realm of finance, not accounting.


 


The biggest risk is in yourself, so education is paramount.


If you are picking stocks you are a professional investor, and you need an Accountant to help you deal with profits and losses.




BlinkyBill

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  Reply # 1850118 22-Aug-2017 06:18
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BlinkyBill:
Kiwifruta:

BlinkyBill: Best personal investments for best returns, ranked in terms of risk (i.e. best return, highest risk), assuming long-term best position is the target outcome (i.e. not a gamble):
1. Own business
2. Picking stocks
3. Paying off personal debt especially mortgage
4. Aggressive funds via fund manager
5. Passive funds or etf's

It is silly to write off property, consider the tax advantages from capital gains.

Don't take financial advice from me or any other person, get reputable professional advice. If you do #1 or #2 get accountancy advice.


 


How would an accountant help with #2?


They are trained in tax and some financial management, not investing. Investment is in the realm of finance, not accounting.


 


The biggest risk is in yourself, so education is paramount.


If you are picking stocks you are a professional investor, and you need an Accountant to help you deal with profits and losses.


Valid point, and I second your list.

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  Reply # 1850137 22-Aug-2017 08:20
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AidanS:

 

Here's my approach to investing (I'm 20.......

 

 

 

 

I won't quote the whole post but I wish I had a head for investing like this when I was 20. I'd be retired in the Caribbean by now.


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  Reply # 1850188 22-Aug-2017 10:00
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Kiwifruta:

 

BlinkyBill: Best personal investments for best returns, ranked in terms of risk (i.e. best return, highest risk), assuming long-term best position is the target outcome (i.e. not a gamble):
1. Own business
2. Picking stocks
3. Paying off personal debt especially mortgage
4. Aggressive funds via fund manager
5. Passive funds or etf's

It is silly to write off property, consider the tax advantages from capital gains.

Don't take financial advice from me or any other person, get reputable professional advice. If you do #1 or #2 get accountancy advice.

 

 

 

How would an accountant help with #2?

 

They are trained in tax and some financial management, not investing. Investment is in the realm of finance, not accounting.

 

 

 

The biggest risk is in yourself, so education is paramount.

 

 

 

 

If you are trading stocks then you'll be up for tax on capital gains. What you need to do is separate your long term buy and hold stocks (no tax on capital gains )  from your shorter term stock holdings


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  Reply # 1850621 22-Aug-2017 18:32
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ben28:

Kiwifruta:


BlinkyBill: Best personal investments for best returns, ranked in terms of risk (i.e. best return, highest risk), assuming long-term best position is the target outcome (i.e. not a gamble):
1. Own business
2. Picking stocks
3. Paying off personal debt especially mortgage
4. Aggressive funds via fund manager
5. Passive funds or etf's

It is silly to write off property, consider the tax advantages from capital gains.

Don't take financial advice from me or any other person, get reputable professional advice. If you do #1 or #2 get accountancy advice.


 


How would an accountant help with #2?


They are trained in tax and some financial management, not investing. Investment is in the realm of finance, not accounting.


 


The biggest risk is in yourself, so education is paramount.



 


If you are trading stocks then you'll be up for tax on capital gains. What you need to do is separate your long term buy and hold stocks (no tax on capital gains )  from your shorter term stock holdings


Great example why you shouldn't take advice from the internet, and why you should use an Accountant. If you are a trader of stocks, you pay tax on ALL gains, held long term or short term.




BlinkyBill

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  Reply # 1850655 22-Aug-2017 20:13
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Do you have stats for an individual picking sticks over passive funds (Ie index) giving better return.

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  Reply # 1850682 22-Aug-2017 21:35
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afe66: Do you have stats for an individual picking sticks over passive funds (Ie index) giving better return.


Don't know to whom you are addressing this question, but perhaps you should listen to Warren Buffet, who has made more money on the stock market than anyone. The indexes do better than virtually everyone, and, in general, those who do well picking stocks are lucky rather than skilful.

Picking stocks is very difficult and time consuming. On average, it is better to follow the indexes.

Not me, Warren Buffet. Also he says, stay in over the long haul. The very long haul.




BlinkyBill

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  Reply # 1850711 22-Aug-2017 21:55
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afe66: Do you have stats for an individual picking sticks over passive funds (Ie index) giving better return.

 

 

 

Check my Podcast link on the first page - they talk about the studies that have been done on this topic and the findings.

 

 


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  Reply # 1850716 22-Aug-2017 22:04
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Generally, most advisers will promote diversity. I am not an adviser, this is how I currently see the world.

 

This doesn't necessarily produce the ultimate return, however the maximum return requires higher elements of risk. The idea of diversity is to build a "Balanced" portfolio.

 

 

 

Here are some things you can invest in.

 

Property has done well over the last 30 years. Mainly because the baby boomers watched a lot of their parents stock/option plans turn into failed schemes. Ask the older generation (around 60-70 years old). It also provides an asset, something tangible. I made a lot of money off my first homes, but I suspect the property market to be somewhat flat for the next wee while.

 

There are other things you can invest in like Commodities. Oil, Gold, Silver etc. These are "run to" safe havens. If you can pick them up for a low price then at some point in the future they will go up. However, they may drop away again when the financial markets seem a bit more bullish.

 

There are stocks/shares. I don't know where to start here.. Generally there is long term, and short term trading. Some people buy shares and sell them 2 hours later... or a week. I have owned these before.. Mainly in utility companies. But have seen people do well out of them. Definately do research and be prepared to be in it for the long haul unless you are certain its gonna hit the wall. 

 

Private investment - you can start a company and acquire  shares or invest in a venture capital fund that is managed.

 

Crypto Currencies - (new) These may, or may not be a good item to invest in. I currently have some Etherium (ETH). But I wouldn't hold onto anything other than BTC (Bitcoin) or ETH at this stage.

 

Cash & Governments Bonds. - These are very safe, provided you can keep them safe.

 

 

 

Just don't put all your eggs in a single basket.








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  Reply # 1850791 22-Aug-2017 23:59
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The problem with buying/selling shares is the high-ish broker fees that comes with buying/selling shares IMO.





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  Reply # 1850861 23-Aug-2017 07:32
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BlinkyBill:
ben28:

 

Kiwifruta:

 

 

 

BlinkyBill: Best personal investments for best returns, ranked in terms of risk (i.e. best return, highest risk), assuming long-term best position is the target outcome (i.e. not a gamble):
1. Own business
2. Picking stocks
3. Paying off personal debt especially mortgage
4. Aggressive funds via fund manager
5. Passive funds or etf's

It is silly to write off property, consider the tax advantages from capital gains.

Don't take financial advice from me or any other person, get reputable professional advice. If you do #1 or #2 get accountancy advice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How would an accountant help with #2?

 

 

 

They are trained in tax and some financial management, not investing. Investment is in the realm of finance, not accounting.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The biggest risk is in yourself, so education is paramount.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you are trading stocks then you'll be up for tax on capital gains. What you need to do is separate your long term buy and hold stocks (no tax on capital gains )  from your shorter term stock holdings

 


Great example why you shouldn't take advice from the internet, and why you should use an Accountant. If you are a trader of stocks, you pay tax on ALL gains, held long term or short term.

 

It is your intent that is the deciding factor.

 

 

 

If you intend to trade for profit  you are up for tax on any gain.

 

 

 

If you intend to hold for income then you pay tax on the income - which is usually done when dividend is paid. If you sell you don't pay tax on any gain. The risk being that if IRD sees frequent sells then they may question your intent


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  Reply # 1851494 23-Aug-2017 20:22
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sonyxperiageek:

 

The problem with buying/selling shares is the high-ish broker fees that comes with buying/selling shares IMO.

 

 

I pay $29.90 a trade which I think is quite reasonable. Compare that with property and what you pay a real estate agent!


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