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  Reply # 1946793 25-Jan-2018 17:12
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What will happen to it when it de-orbits?

 

The Humanity Star will burn up on re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, leaving no trace in space or on Earth.

 

 

I'm no scientist, but isn't that against some sort of physics law...

 

While I'm all for innovation and these dudes are nailing it for NZ, I'm with freitasm, our atmosphere will be the new "pacific garbage patch" in 50 years.


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  Reply # 1946796 25-Jan-2018 17:18
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Coil:

 

trig42:

 

Here is that article in NZ Herald - Ian Griffin quite angry about it. http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11981960

 

IMO, it is cool. Looking forward to seeing it. 

 

He has a chip on his shoulder as a self proclaimed Astrology expert. He will have a reason to try and deface the company. 

 

You really meant astronomy right? Bit of a difference there smile

 

I fail to see the difference between the Humanity Star vs the original sputnik beeping away announcing it was there, or the "bright star" of the international space station "polluting" the night sky. It's not there forever and there will no trace in nine months time.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1946797 25-Jan-2018 17:20
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freitasm:

 

Do we need more stuff in space? Sure, what is one more to add to the more of 500,000 pieces already there (as of 2013)...

 

If you didn't detect the sarcasm, I meant we don't need more junk up there. and when it comes back where is it going to land? Is it safe? Won't it hit any airplane or fall into someone's roof?

 

 

Yeah! I mean, what if it got so hot during re-entry that it landed in somebody's swimming pool and immediately vaporised the water and they tried to jump into the pool and it was empty and they hurt themselves???

 

What if it landed on the head of a mother deer and killed it and her baby deer had to grow up without a mother?

 

What if it landed on a trampoline and bounced back up into the sky and into space and then crashed with the moon?


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  Reply # 1946800 25-Jan-2018 17:26
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I like it.

 

Makes a cool statement - and is gone in 9 months, so those worried about night sky pollution can relax - and with no risk to anyone when it burns up on re-entry.


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  Reply # 1946831 25-Jan-2018 19:49
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MurrayM:

 

 

What will happen to it when it de-orbits?

 

The Humanity Star will burn up on re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, leaving no trace in space or on Earth.

 

 

 

 

 

They said that about skylab too... Then the Indian Ocean... 

 

Big fail. :D


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  Reply # 1946840 25-Jan-2018 20:44
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blakamin:

MurrayM:



What will happen to it when it de-orbits?


The Humanity Star will burn up on re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, leaving no trace in space or on Earth.




 


They said that about skylab too... Then the Indian Ocean... 


Big fail. :D



Few kg of carbon fibre vs 10s of thousands of kg worth of metal

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  Reply # 1946865 25-Jan-2018 21:03
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throbb:
blakamin:

 

MurrayM:

 

 

 

 

 

 

What will happen to it when it de-orbits?

 

 

 

The Humanity Star will burn up on re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere, leaving no trace in space or on Earth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They said that about skylab too... Then the Indian Ocean... 

 

 

 

Big fail. :D

 



Few kg of carbon fibre vs 10s of thousands of kg worth of metal

 

 

 

Guy I went to school with still has some.


bmt

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  Reply # 1946880 25-Jan-2018 21:38
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freitasm:

 

Do we need more stuff in space? Sure, what is one more to add to the more of 500,000 pieces already there (as of 2013)...

 

If you didn't detect the sarcasm, I meant we don't need more junk up there. and when it comes back where is it going to land? Is it safe? Won't it hit any airplane or fall into someone's roof?

 

 

You cannot be serious??

 

Made of carbon fibre, a couple of kg, less than 2m in diameter, hundreds of km above earth and you think any of those things are a possibility?

 

Surely your sarcasm is in the second line!!


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  Reply # 1946956 26-Jan-2018 07:15
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I tore this jackass a new one and this happened lol.

 





Steam: Coil (Same photos as profile here)
Origin: Scranax
Currently playing on PC: Rust, Subnautica, CS:GO, AOE2 HD, BeamNG Drive, BF1.


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  Reply # 1946959 26-Jan-2018 07:24
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Whilst it is very cool, I question how much this is a *NZ* innovation. RocketLab NZ is a wholly owned subsidiary of RocketLab (US). How much of the business is the NZ-created content? Would this be like like French Guiana claiming to be the home of the Ariane rocket?

 

 


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  Reply # 1946966 26-Jan-2018 07:53
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I think this is a super jackass thing to do.

 

Like the idiot who burnt his name onto those patients organs: It hasn't done any real, actual harm, but it's a real "Look at me" d|ck move.

 

Think about it this way: If Donald Trump had done this, you'll all be falling over yourselves to say what a pompous, ego inflating action it was.




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  Reply # 1946970 26-Jan-2018 08:05
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Wow. You cant compare Trump doing something unrelated to his role, to a satellite launch company launching a satellite. It cost them money, it will earn no revenue, and its a temporary feel good factor, as compared to what humans normally do, take, take, take.


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  Reply # 1946971 26-Jan-2018 08:07
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I'm curious:

 

1. What causes re-entry in 90 days?

 

2. What keeps other expensive satellites in orbit for longer periods?

 

I'm assuming:

 

1. Gravitational pull lowers it bit by bit over the 90 days until it eventually can't stay up no more?

 

2. More expensive satellites orbit higher and gravitational pull has less influence on them?

 

Any scientists out there?




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  Reply # 1946973 26-Jan-2018 08:15
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dafman:

 

I'm curious:

 

1. What causes re-entry in 90 days?

 

2. What keeps other expensive satellites in orbit for longer periods?

 

I'm assuming:

 

1. Gravitational pull lowers it bit by bit over the 90 days until it eventually can't stay up no more?

 

2. More expensive satellites orbit higher and gravitational pull has less influence on them?

 

Any scientists out there?

 

 

Everything decays on low orbit. ISS has to boost itself back up every now and then. Low earth Orbit has a very small amount of atmosphere, that's drag. I also assume that high orbit doesn't decay, i.e. satellites such as Optus. Unsure if they have a boost mechanism, especially as they are geo stationary, they orbit at a speed that matches the Earth's rotation. The Moon is actually moving away, I recall about a cm a year.

 

Like anything in the Universe, its amazing!




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  Reply # 1946974 26-Jan-2018 08:17
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@dafman

 

While the satellites are geo-stationary – that is, they stay at a fixed position relative to Earth - they can often shift out of its designated position, or orbital slot, due to the shape and tilt of the planet. Through the control centre, satellite operators can gently nudge them back into place.

 

https://www.arnnet.com.au/slideshow/393410/pictures-inside-optus-satellite-earth-station-belrose/

 

 


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