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  Reply # 1947096 26-Jan-2018 11:45
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Coil:

afe66: I'm in the anti camp.
Seems a bit unnecessary and bit of a gimmick. (like Musk putting his Tesla on top of the heavy rocket next month)

The international space station is visible to the naked eye and there are websites which tell you the transit times based on your location.

A large space station with permanent crew of people is much more interesting to me than a glowing dot.


 


So would you rather they put something else in there?  
Genuinely curious as to why people are anti? What if the carbon fibre ball was a matte colour and not reflective and they just called it a "test payload that will deorbit in 90 days"? Just because it reflects light does it really make it something to be against?




In the modern world it seems harder to get away from man's changes. That's why many people go on holiday to see nature or unchanged environment. It's why people come to nz, see the unspoiled Bush etc.

I'm not bothered that they want to put an object in space, collect data and learn from it, I just think making it bright so everyone can see it, google it and go to the company website is unnecessary.

If it's a pr success then the next rocket company somewhere else the the world will do the same and maybe they want more pr coverage do they make it "bigger", "brighter" "longer".

We can't stop other countries from doing it if they want but do we, who often crow about how pure we are, want to be in the vanguard of this sort of thing.

Just because we can do something, doesn't mean we should.






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  Reply # 1947097 26-Jan-2018 11:49
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I am in the mixed feelings crowd as well. I will be looking out for it in the sky and pointing it out to my kids. But I am worried about the precedent it could set. What if next time it is something bigger and obnoxious rather than a shiny ball? It is good in that it is something to look up and think about and imagine the possibilities. But there is already a space junk problem which will need to be addressed. Light pollution is already an issue for astronomy and it is possible for this to pass through a field when someone is doing a long exposure potentially destroying the value of that exposure. It happens with existing satellites and even planes.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1947099 26-Jan-2018 11:51
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I honestly don't see the problem with this. They needed to put up a test object, so why not something that people can see? It would be a different matter if the thing was permanent, but it's not, so why all the aggro? It doesn't hurt anything, it won't be there long, and it won't cause any problems when it comes down. I think it was a neat thing to do. The Tesla is another matter.

 

 

 

 





I reject your reality and substitute my own. - Adam Savage
 


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  Reply # 1947107 26-Jan-2018 12:05
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  Reply # 1947124 26-Jan-2018 12:54
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I personally don't see the issue. Its only temporary and won't be much different from all the other visible satellites which seem to be an accepted part of life. Presumably it was cleared by the relevant regulators as well.

I'm intrigued to see artificial meteor showers might become a thing, that seems a bit more controversial than this.

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  Reply # 1947125 26-Jan-2018 13:02
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"I just think making it bright so everyone can see it, google it and go to the company website is unnecessary".


 

 

 

It's not the RocketLab website, it's one dedicated solely to The Humanity Star Project.

 

 

 

As far as I can see it's not PR for the company rather than PR for Space...  


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  Reply # 1947126 26-Jan-2018 13:02
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Someone looking up at the night sky will probably put some religious significance to it. It least it will be gone by December so it can't be confused with the star of Bethlehem. Then again if it looks like a falling star when it comes back down, is it another sign of the end of the world?





Oh no, not another end of the world prediction


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  Reply # 1947127 26-Jan-2018 13:03
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Rikkitic:

 

I honestly don't see the problem with this. They needed to put up a test object, so why not something that people can see? It would be a different matter if the thing was permanent, but it's not, so why all the aggro? It doesn't hurt anything, it won't be there long, and it won't cause any problems when it comes down. I think it was a neat thing to do. The Tesla is another matter.

 

 

Why do they need a test object? This doesn't say anything about it, just a load of hot air.

 

Didn't they also launch 3 other proper satellites with the launch?

 

 

 

If it's truely to gather some sort of test data as well, then I have a different opinion of it.  That's fine, there's nothing wrong with learning.

 

This doesn't seem to be that.


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Reply # 1947141 26-Jan-2018 13:17
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I think it's a great way of warning the rest of the world - we can strike you no matter where you are...


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  Reply # 1947143 26-Jan-2018 13:18
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Dratsab:

 

I think it's a great way of warning the rest of the world - we can strike you no matter where you are...

 

 

 

 

I think they achieved that back in the 60s lol.





Steam: Coil (Same photos as profile here)
Origin: Scranax
Currently playing on PC: Rust, Subnautica, CS:GO, AOE2 HD, BeamNG Drive, BF1.


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  Reply # 1947150 26-Jan-2018 13:35
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Coil:

 

Dratsab: I think it's a great way of warning the rest of the world - we can strike you no matter where you are... 

 

I think they achieved that back in the 60s lol. 

 

New Zealand didn't.


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  Reply # 1947229 26-Jan-2018 16:12
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I think it's a great idea and can't wait to see it when it next comes overhead.

 

Peter Beck:

 

My hope is that everyone looking up at the Humanity Star will look past it to the expanse of the universe, feel a connection to our place in it and think a little differently about their lives, actions and what is important.

 

 

Thats good enough a reason to do it for me.


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  Reply # 1947249 26-Jan-2018 17:05
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spencer:

 

I think it's a great idea and can't wait to see it when it next comes overhead.

 

Peter Beck:

 

My hope is that everyone looking up at the Humanity Star will look past it to the expanse of the universe, feel a connection to our place in it and think a little differently about their lives, actions and what is important.

 

 

Thats good enough a reason to do it for me.

 

 

 

 

I agree! now if only they could have timed it to be visible to NZ at the same time as the Solar Eclipse....


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  Reply # 1947279 26-Jan-2018 17:47
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Varkk:

 

I am in the mixed feelings crowd as well. I will be looking out for it in the sky and pointing it out to my kids. But I am worried about the precedent it could set. What if next time it is something bigger and obnoxious rather than a shiny ball? It is good in that it is something to look up and think about and imagine the possibilities. But there is already a space junk problem which will need to be addressed. Light pollution is already an issue for astronomy and it is possible for this to pass through a field when someone is doing a long exposure potentially destroying the value of that exposure. It happens with existing satellites and even planes.

 

 

 

 

I would feel that way, except they have designed it to only have a short duration and, it will also burn up on re-entry. I think there should be a requirement of anything put up into space, to have this requirement. eg. designed to fall back to earth, and either fall back to an unpopulated area or burn up. So in some ways they are showing good practice that others should be following. But I agree in some ways that it is something that Trump would do, although his would be gold.

 

What is interesting though is that people think it is okay for something commercial to go into space that mainly financially benefits a company. But not something that is non commercial and is more of a symbol / piece of art. Sort of double standards IMO.


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  Reply # 1947290 26-Jan-2018 18:57
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There is a requirement mattwnz. Rocket Lab need's FAA licencing and go ahead due to being a US company. The Humanity Star had to be given the OK by the US FAA and the NZ govt.

 

People hysterically claiming company A could just send up something bigger or brighter - um, how? Who are they going to get to do that for them? Not going to happen on any rocket remotely US due to aforementioned.

 

Some people just don't understand this, much like that idiot photographer. It's not going to be visible at all in New Zealand until the 20th of February. It orbits the earth every 90 minutes. It would be visible for MERE MINUTES.

 

Also don't understand why people keep saying 3 months, the website quite clearly says it will orbit for 9 months.


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