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Topic # 239546 23-Jul-2018 10:40
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So I took my wife's Nokia 7 Plus phone - which she has been using for less than a week - back to The Warehouse as it has completely lost the will to live. 

 

Given that it has had two major faults in lass than a week (phone won't charge properly, and the screen is dodgy to the point it has now completely died) I've requested that they replace the phone, rather than try to repair it - but of course they'll probably try the latter. Then they said they needed to charge a bond (I think $60) before they'd send it off for repair; luckily the worker forgot to charge me. 

 

But my favourite part of the 40 minutes it took to lodge the repair request was when they asked for the 'username' and password for the device. When I said this was inappropriate he called his manager (for the third time!) who said this was compulsory, and the device would not be sent away until this was provided. 

 

I had been unable to reset the phone (which I would normally have done) as the screen is completely dead, so all my wife's data was still on it. That said, I made it clear I would not have provided the password even if there had been no personal data on the phone, simply on principle. 

 

Surely the policy could be that if the password is not provided the phone owner simply needs to acknowledge and accept the device is likely to be wiped? In this case, I just noted in the password field 'please call [phone no.] to discuss', but I'm sure there will be many people who feel they have no choice but to provide it.

 

It would be interesting to know what the Privacy Commissioner would think of this approach... Interested in others' thoughts and experiences with such repairs.


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  Reply # 2060872 23-Jul-2018 10:42
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Without your password there is very little testing they can do for a fault fix. If you acknowledge that, then refusing to give your password is fine. If they won't send it for repair, that's not ok.

 

 




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  Reply # 2060878 23-Jul-2018 10:55
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Yep, I do get that.

 

I would have thought that almost all devices could be factory reset without having to have access into the current account, and in all these cases the person should be given the option: if you don't provide the password the device will be reset and all data on it will be  deleted. 

 

My problem is that The Warehouse did not present this as an option, making it a black-and-white requirement of accepting the item for repair that I had to provide the password. It was only because the worker totally understood where I was coming from (and let me enter in my phone number, not the password) that I was able to bypass this.

 

I think part of the problem here is that a "Jack of all trades" retailer like The Warehouse doesn't really have the specialist knowledge or consideration that this kind of stuff requires - a phone repair's slightly different to a standard household item. That is no excuse, though, especially since the parent company owns NLs as well.


 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 2060881 23-Jul-2018 10:59
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jonathan18:

 

Yep, I do get that.

 

I would have thought that almost all devices could be factory reset without having to have access into the current account, and in all these cases the person should be given the option: if you don't provide the password the device will be reset and all data on it will be  deleted. 

 

My problem is that The Warehouse did not present this as an option, making it a black-and-white requirement of accepting the item for repair that I had to provide the password. It was only because the worker totally understood where I was coming from (and let me enter in my phone number, not the password) that I was able to bypass this.

 

I think part of the problem here is that a "Jack of all trades" retailer like The Warehouse doesn't really have the specialist knowledge or consideration that this kind of stuff requires - a phone repair's slightly different to a standard household item. That is no excuse, though, especially since the parent company owns NLs as well.

 

 

Pretty much exactly that.

 

 


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  Reply # 2060968 23-Jul-2018 12:56
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FRP is a real thing on mobiles now.

https://www.samsung.com/us/support/frp/

This is another gotcha when you buy 2nd hand. If it's nicked, badly obtained or silly user who doesn't remove the accounts before doing the reset the next user gets asked for the details...

Likely another reason.

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  Reply # 2061001 23-Jul-2018 13:51
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FRP does read like a factory reset can be done... but you can't use the phone without the Google ID and PW.

 

Surely some factory reset diagnostics can be done by the service agent without the need for Google ID?

 

 





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  Reply # 2061019 23-Jul-2018 14:18
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Samsung service agents can definitely reset FRP. I don't see why other manufacturers can't as well. 


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  Reply # 2061054 23-Jul-2018 15:13
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As an Apple service provider we are not allowed to ask for the users apple ID and password, for security and privacy reasons.

 

If the device is locked to an iCloud account and the user can't remove the device from their iCloud account, which you can do from the iCloud website, then we can't help them.

 

Only Apple themselves can help with unlocking the device, and they require proof of purchase from an Apple Authorised Reseller.





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  Reply # 2061057 23-Jul-2018 15:20
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FWIW, Mrs MDF also had to return a Nokia (5 in our case) to the Warehouse for a repair - no cellular connection at all. We weren't asked for a password. We were however charged the bond (did get it back) but had all sorts of issues trying to provide the IMEI number. Wasn't appearing in the menu and *#06# seemed to cause it to go into a screaming fit (literally). The Warehouse staff tried to be helpful, but they had a form to fill out and would not deviate from that process, even where it looked like the actual fault may have had something to do with a missing bit of information for said form,

 

Then trying to get the IMEI number out of her cell provider was it's own special nightmare since her SIM had been in 3 different phones in 24 hours trying to diagnose the issue.


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