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  Reply # 2117713 1-Nov-2018 09:56
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sidefx:

 

@quickymart Has aerial expert actually fixed it or just charged you $300 to determine it's a faulty freeview tuner?

 

I have to agree with others that 8 years sounds a bit long to expect the CGA to cover it. It sounds from your OP that you're more annoyed with having to spend $300 to find out it's a faulty tuner?

 

 

I'm really suprized that after 8 years you can still get it fixed or the tuner replaced. I've seen TVs only a couple of years old replaced because something like the panel died and no spares available.





Regards,

Old3eyes


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  Reply # 2117725 1-Nov-2018 10:21
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quickymart: No no extended warranty, so no hope there. A pity, it's a nice TV, just a pain to have yet another remote to control it now. Never mind, I guess it's working.


From "another remote" it sounds like as suggested the cure involved using an external tuner. How much of the $300 went into diagnosis and how much into tuner? Or was the tuner an additional cost?

 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 2117988 1-Nov-2018 17:18
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The $300 included him coming out, testing the aerial, removing the VHF one and providing a new Freeview tuner box.
First time I've had a built in tuner die on me, so I had no idea what to expect.

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  Reply # 2118039 1-Nov-2018 18:45
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Lias:. I'm pretty sure Consumer says a TV should last 5-10 years, and $1000 isn't really at the higher end of things.

 

 

Sigh...it's not price, its quality.

 

You can buy an expensive 52" Junk brand TV or say a cheaper 32"entry level quality brand. Which is the longer lasting?

 

 

 

There is no list of expected life expectancies for fridges, freezers, dishwashers, washing machines, jugs, microwaves, stoves, vacuums and ovens, though Consumer, the shoppers' advocate, has provided an invaluable guide based on a survey of manufacturers' and a poll of consumers.

 

Judging whether a household appliance had failed unreasonably soon, a court or tribunal considers multiple factors, including the price and useage.

 

Appliance makers and retailers both still claim limited manufacturers' warranties of one and two years, and retailers try to sell extended warranties that shoppers are told start at the point the manufacturers' warranties end.

 

The problem is that CGA cases for fridges don't get heard in the expensive higher courts, says Miller. "There's not a lot of case law."

 

Jeff Windress from Windress Home Appliance Services, which fixes broken appliances, says invoking the act is the most powerful weapon the public has.

 

"As soon as somebody mentions the Consumer Guarantees Act, the item gets replaced," he says.

 

And a particularly irritated buyer might even up the ante because, Miller says, it is a breach of the Fair Trading Act to tell someone they do not have a claim under the CGA when really they do.

 

With prices for consumer appliances now very low compared to those which previous generations paid, many suspect the reasonable expected lifespan of the likes of whiteware has plummeted.

 

"My mother's generation generally would expect appliances to last 20 years," Miller says. "The proportion of income that a washing machine would cost made them very expensive."

 

Windress says: "The consumer is driving the price down so you can't make something that's going to last. If you are going to buy a washing machine for $395, you can't afford to put a $400 motor in it."

 

While the younger generations seem to accept that, older folk don't.

 

But Windress believes we may be nearing a low point in the lifespan of appliances, and that people will one day realise it will work out cheaper over their lifetimes to spend more on each appliance, and get longer use out of it.

 

DVD players and recorders, CD players

 

Economic life: 2-5+ years. (Some manufacturers intend to keep parts for 10 years.) Life expectancy: 15+ years (high-quality brands), 3 years (cheap brands). High-definition DVD recorders are about to make the current crop look out of date. Repair: Dirty heads, especially if a clean-up will do it. CD/DVD loading and drive mechanisms on more expensive machines. (If the hard drive fails early on, use your CGA rights for repair or replacement. If it fails on an older machine, consider buying a replacement.) Tip: Keep those CDs and DVDs clean. If you have a hard-drive recorder model, archive those precious tracks to disc so that you have a permanent copy.

 

Home-theatre systems, stereo components, stereo systems

 

Economic life: 2-15 years. Life expectancy: 15+ years (systems with high-quality hi-fi components), 10 years (the better-quality all-in-one systems), 3 years (cheaper models). Repair: Get quotes. For expensive systems, most problems should be worth fixing. For cheaper all-in-one systems cleaning dirty CD/DVD player heads or CD/DVD loading mechanisms may be all that's worth doing.

 

TVs: Tube (CRT) models

 

Economic life: 4-15 years. Manufacturers say CRTs will be obsolete within a few years because of technology changes such as HDTV (high-definition TV). But we think standard-definition TV will be around for a while yet. Life expectancy: 12+ years. Repair: Worth considering up to 10 years old. But get a quote first. Tip: If it'll fit in the car, take it to the repair workshop yourself - and save the service-call fee.

 

TVs: Plasma and LCD models

 

Economic life: 5-15 years. Life expectancy: 12+ years. Repair: Most are still likely to be covered by the factory warranty or the CGA. If it fails, take it back to the store. See also "Price matters". Tip: Plasma-screen owners should take care to avoid "burn in" - it's not covered by warranty. Avoid showing the same picture (such as a vivid TV-station logo or a normal (4:3 format) television image for hours on end on the plasma's wider (16:9) screen. Urban legend? Pixel failure (where several of the small picture-units fail in a noticeable group) was expected to be a problem in newer models. But so far we've found little evidence of this.

 

Tech products

 

Computers

 

Economic life: 3-7 years. Life expectancy: 5 years (but if you keep up with software releases, your computer may be obsolete much sooner). Repair: Power supply. Consider an upgrade if motherboard, hard drive or monitor fail.

 

Printers, scanners (including multifunction models)

 

Economic life: 3-6 years. Life expectancy: 5 years. Repair: Only if it was an expensive model. New printers can cost as little as $80. Multifunction models are also very affordable now.

 

Mobile phones

 

Economic life: Often determined by battery failure. Battery can cost 60% of the phone. Length of life is also a fashion issue! Life expectancy: 5+ years. Repair: Possible for most phones, but they're potentially expensive (it's usually easier to replace most of the internal workings). Consider upgrading if it's 2 years old, even if only the battery has failed. Shop around on the net if your phone battery fails. Note: Telecom's new 3G XT network may mean a phone bought prior to June 2009 is obsolete in 2012. Tip: Look after it - phones are particularly sensitive to water.

 

Cordless phones

 

Economic life: 2-5 years. Life expectancy: 5+ years. Repair: Higher-value phones may be worth repairing. Replace cheap phones with the newer digital models.

 

Digital cameras, camcorders

 

Economic life: 2-8 years. Life expectancy: 5-10 years, depending on purchase price. Repair: Only for newer high-value models. Not worth considering for older models - upgrade to a newer one. Advances in technology and lower production costs are making even the more-recent models obsolete.

 

MP3 players

 

Economic life: 5-7 years. Life expectancy: 5-10 years, depending on purchase price. Repair: Manufacturers tend to replace rather than repair during warranty (repair is limited to high-value models). Warranties are quite short, so use the CGA if it fails early on. Otherwise, consider buying a replacement instead of getting it repaired (unless it was a very expensive model).

 

 


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  Reply # 2119332 4-Nov-2018 07:15
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You say you were moving house. Presumably the TV worked before the move. And it didn't work after the move. Fair to conclude it got damaged in the transition and thats not covered by the CGA.

 

 

 

$1500 for a TV 8 years ago. So it wasnt an expensive TV - so despite brand reputation, expectation of a superior long lasting piece of electronic equipment should diminish.

 

 

 

You got 8 years. In my mind not an unreasonable period and not covered by the CGA.

 

 

 

(in their screaming against off shore internet purchases its a great shame NZ retailers dont scream equally loudly about the advantage a NZ purchase has with its automatic CGA warranty)


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  Reply # 2119336 4-Nov-2018 07:45
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Unless the back came off for testing I've still got a suspicion that maybe removing the aerial lead damaged the socket connection to the board.



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  Reply # 2119337 4-Nov-2018 07:46
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minimoke:

 

You say you were moving house. Presumably the TV worked before the move. And it didn't work after the move. Fair to conclude it got damaged in the transition and thats not covered by the CGA.

 

 

 

$1500 for a TV 8 years ago. So it wasnt an expensive TV - so despite brand reputation, expectation of a superior long lasting piece of electronic equipment should diminish.

 

 

 

You got 8 years. In my mind not an unreasonable period and not covered by the CGA.

 

 

 

(in their screaming against off shore internet purchases its a great shame NZ retailers dont scream equally loudly about the advantage a NZ purchase has with its automatic CGA warranty)

 

 

Thanks, I think I already got the answer I needed.


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