Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
6735 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2284530 27-Jul-2019 12:22
Send private message quote this post

josephhinvest: 🔘 🇬🇧 English
⚪️ 🇺🇸 Simplified English

 

They didn't even simplify it consistently. For example, "practice/practise" both became "practice" with a C, yet "licence/license" became "license" with an S!


1287 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284578 27-Jul-2019 15:01
3 people support this post
Send private message quote this post

There is an argument to be made that "sodder" is closer to the original pronunciation, from the french Souder (but you'll never catch me saying sodder, to be clear).

 

As for "rooter", that's just silly.  You follow a "rowte", you plan a "rowte" and the device chooses a "rowte" for your packets, therefore it's a "rowter", if your router roots your packets, get a new router.

 

Also, SQL is Ess Queue Ell, not sequel, there's no bleedin' E!

 

 





---
James Sleeman
I sell lots of stuff for electronic enthusiasts...


 
 
 
 


6735 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2284580 27-Jul-2019 15:04
Send private message quote this post

sleemanj: You follow a "rowte", you plan a "rowte"

 

Speak for yourself...


1384 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284645 27-Jul-2019 18:17
Send private message quote this post


i would hazard a guess that ‘Rout’ is likely a Norman word, so the ou sound could be pronounced oo. I think the same applies in gaelic (although not sure).

however, I think in the old saxon language, the ou (double vowel) becomes a dipthong, so could have been pronounced as in ‘out’. The R is a semi-vowel, and I think might absorb a vowel at the end of a word ‘are’ becomes ‘ar’ I guess but I can’t remember what happens to a semi-vowel at the front of a word - from memory I think it enhances the consonant sound. So you end up with rout sounding like ‘out’

Perhaps solder changes because the L is treated as a mute consonant as in would and could.

Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).




Software Engineer

 


471 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2284674 27-Jul-2019 20:33
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

I don’t think I’ve heard ‘sodder’ yet. Slightly bemused since I’m pretty sure they can pronounce ‘soldier’ correctly, yet are apparently messing up ‘solder’

347 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2284699 27-Jul-2019 21:59
Send private message quote this post

TwoSeven:
i would hazard a guess that ‘Rout’ is likely a Norman word, so the ou sound could be pronounced oo. I think the same applies in gaelic (although not sure).

however, I think in the old saxon language, the ou (double vowel) becomes a dipthong, so could have been pronounced as in ‘out’. The R is a semi-vowel, and I think might absorb a vowel at the end of a word ‘are’ becomes ‘ar’ I guess but I can’t remember what happens to a semi-vowel at the front of a word - from memory I think it enhances the consonant sound. So you end up with rout sounding like ‘out’

Perhaps solder changes because the L is treated as a mute consonant as in would and could.

Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).

 

 

From the Old French 'rute', so post Old English. It is a pretty oddball spelling.

 

 

Could's spelling was modified to cosmetically match would and should. Those words came from Old English. Solder was modified to match it's Latin origin but originally entered English without the l from Old French. Other words weren't updated, e.g we may pulverise a substance to powder.

 

 

Aluminum is still an accepted variant spelling for the element.

1287 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284702 27-Jul-2019 22:09
Send private message quote this post

That link makes me wonder if anybody says "traceroot", surely not.





---
James Sleeman
I sell lots of stuff for electronic enthusiasts...


 
 
 
 


13339 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2284705 27-Jul-2019 22:34
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Brunzy: Sawed ...Sod
Sold ...Solder

Was in a Supermarket in the US last week and asked where I’d find Beetroot.
After 3 or 4 goes he said “ do you want hand cream “ ???
BTW they’re called beets ;-)

 


Sorry - you actually WANTED beetroot?! 🤮






471 posts

Ultimate Geek


  # 2284710 27-Jul-2019 23:50
Send private message quote this post

When I was in a US supermarket it took me a few tries to explain cordial without them thinking I was asking about manners. Once they did figure out what I was after it turned out they only have frozen fruit concentrate in those tubes similar to the ones that you get their ‘biscuit dough’ in.

I left with Ribena out of the international section cause I hadn’t had it for a while and couldn’t be arsed thawing my drink base.

885 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted

  # 2284715 28-Jul-2019 00:42
One person supports this post
Send private message quote this post

Geektastic:

Brunzy: Sawed ...Sod
Sold ...Solder

Was in a Supermarket in the US last week and asked where I’d find Beetroot.
After 3 or 4 goes he said “ do you want hand cream “ ???
BTW they’re called beets ;-)



Sorry - you actually WANTED beetroot?! 🤮



Don’t shoot the messenger, ;-)). swmbo

Actually I like Beetroot

Overarching undertones
3851 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  # 2284754 28-Jul-2019 09:56
Send private message quote this post

sleemanj:

 

As for "rooter", that's just silly.  You follow a "rowte", you plan a "rowte" and the device chooses a "rowte" for your packets, therefore it's a "rowter", if your router roots your packets, get a new router.

 

 

 

 

Even this doesn’t make it clear - because it depends on how you pronounce ‘row’. Is it pronounced as ‘roe’ (as in propelling a boat) or ‘rau’ (as in an argument)?

 

So under your explanation you could have router pronounced as roe-ter or rau-ter.


1287 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284759 28-Jul-2019 10:04
Send private message quote this post

eracode:

Even this doesn’t make it clear - because it depends on how you pronounce ‘row’. Is it pronounced as ‘roe’ (as in propelling a boat) or ‘rau’ (as in an argument)?


So under your explanation you could have router pronounced as roe-ter or rau-ter.




No no, it is pronounced throatwarbler mangrove.




---
James Sleeman
I sell lots of stuff for electronic enthusiasts...


1384 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284797 28-Jul-2019 12:10
Send private message quote this post

rhy7s:
TwoSeven:
i would hazard a guess that ‘Rout’ is likely a Norman word, so the ou sound could be pronounced oo. I think the same applies in gaelic (although not sure).

however, I think in the old saxon language, the ou (double vowel) becomes a dipthong, so could have been pronounced as in ‘out’. The R is a semi-vowel, and I think might absorb a vowel at the end of a word ‘are’ becomes ‘ar’ I guess but I can’t remember what happens to a semi-vowel at the front of a word - from memory I think it enhances the consonant sound. So you end up with rout sounding like ‘out’

Perhaps solder changes because the L is treated as a mute consonant as in would and could.

Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).


From the Old French 'rute', so post Old English. It is a pretty oddball spelling.

Could's spelling was modified to cosmetically match would and should. Those words came from Old English. Solder was modified to match it's Latin origin but originally entered English without the l from Old French. Other words weren't updated, e.g we may pulverise a substance to powder.

Aluminum is still an accepted variant spelling for the element.


I think Old english is basically the saxon language (both the jutes and angles spoke the same language). In the late european bronze age, this I think was the same as the Danish language.

I would suggest the Old french as a language didn’t turn up for another 400 years after the saxon settling of Britannia, during the Viking period when languages started to adopt a more modern form of danish known as Norse.

Roman latin (before saxon english) has the word ‘’plumbo’ which means to make of lead. Circumplumbo - to cover in lead. Adplumbo - to solder on (with lead). Also, ferrumin which means cement, solder, glue.

My suggestion that the L is a mute consonant was because in the modern regional dialect the double L is sometimes simplified to a single one, suggesting the single L is being dropped or not pronounced.

Aluminium was discovered by Hans Christian Orsted from memory when researching the salt Alum. It is my understanding the latin suffix -ium is added in chemistry to denote a metal.

Aluminum to me would be a regional dialect of the word aluminium as one has mentioned and in common enough usage for people to interchange it.






Software Engineer

 


3440 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  # 2284817 28-Jul-2019 14:11
Send private message quote this post

TwoSeven: Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).

 

rhy7s: Aluminum is still an accepted variant spelling for the element.

 

I decided to look it up. The answer is here. In short, it comes down to the original namer of the element changing his mind over the spelling with several intervening years and an American dictionary, even later in the piece, settling on the original spelling.


1384 posts

Uber Geek


  # 2284923 28-Jul-2019 19:33
Send private message quote this post

Dratsab:

TwoSeven: Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).


rhy7s: Aluminum is still an accepted variant spelling for the element.


I decided to look it up. The answer is here. In short, it comes down to the original namer of the element changing his mind over the spelling with several intervening years and an American dictionary, even later in the piece, settling on the original spelling.



I am not sure that article is correct.

It was my understanding that the extract of the salt alum, was to be called alumium, but was changed to aluminium). The -ium exists on both.

It wouldn’t make sense for an english scientist to use the american vernacular and spell the word -um both because other metals were named -ium and the websters dictionary was still in its early days.




Software Engineer

 


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic



Twitter and LinkedIn »



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when new discussions are posted in our forums:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when news items and blogs are posted in our frontpage:



Follow us to receive Twitter updates when tech item prices are listed in our price comparison site:





News »

OPPO Reno2 Series lands, alongside hybrid noise-cancelling Wireless Headphones
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:32


Waikato Data Scientists awarded $13 million from the Government
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:27


D-Link launches Wave 2 Unified Access Points
Posted 24-Oct-2019 15:07


LG Electronics begins distributing the G8X THINQ
Posted 24-Oct-2019 10:58


Arlo unveils its first video doorbell
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:27


New Zealand students shortlisted for James Dyson Award
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:18


Norton LifeLock Launches Norton 360
Posted 21-Oct-2019 08:11


Microsoft New Zealand Partner Awards results
Posted 18-Oct-2019 10:18


Logitech introduces new Made for Google keyboard and mouse devices
Posted 16-Oct-2019 13:36


MATTR launches to accelerate decentralised identity
Posted 16-Oct-2019 10:28


Vodafone X-Squad powers up for customers
Posted 16-Oct-2019 08:15


D Link ANZ launches EXO Smart Mesh Wi Fi Routers with McAfee protection
Posted 15-Oct-2019 11:31


Major Japanese retailer partners with smart New Zealand technology IMAGR
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:29


Ola pioneers one-time passcode feature to fight rideshare fraud
Posted 14-Oct-2019 10:24


Spark Sport new home of NZC matches from 2020
Posted 10-Oct-2019 09:59



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.