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40 posts

Geek


  # 2285405 29-Jul-2019 21:55
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There's also the very thing we're on, the inner-net in American speak. They seem to have an issue with the letter 't' along with "water" being pronounced "warder" or Patty being Paddy.  I tried requesting water on a Korean Air flight a few years back (they tend to speak with an American access) and after trying variations from water to warder I went with an orange juice. 


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Master Geek


  # 2285512 30-Jul-2019 08:39
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Better get used to it.

 

Everything is slowly decaying into American English.

 

More quickly in New Zealand than back in the UK from my experience.

 

BTW, just to get in my two penneth:

 

Roo-ter= Networking equipment.

 

Rau-ter= Woodworking equipment.

 

Simples. 😀


 
 
 
 


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  # 2285554 30-Jul-2019 09:37
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TwoSeven:
Dratsab:

 

TwoSeven: Aluminium is the name of the element. Alumina is the ore (I think).

 

rhy7s: Aluminum is still an accepted variant spelling for the element.

 

I decided to look it up. The answer is here. In short, it comes down to the original namer of the element changing his mind over the spelling with several intervening years and an American dictionary, even later in the piece, settling on the original spelling.

 



I am not sure that article is correct.

 

Best you take that up with Michael Quinion - the guy that's actually researched it.

TwoSeven: It was my understanding that the extract of the salt alum, was to be called alumium, but was changed to aluminium). The -ium exists on both.

It wouldn’t make sense for an english scientist to use the american vernacular and spell the word -um both because other metals were named -ium and the websters dictionary was still in its early days.

 

Except he didn't use American vernacular - according to the article the American version came about because of Humphrey's first choice. The Websters spelling (1828) is dated much later than the 1812 change to "ium" and is counter to what was being used in American scientific circles at the time. Following the sub-link in the article I linked to takes you to the original authors article which contains more details, including references to newspaper articles.


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  # 2289213 3-Aug-2019 15:21
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Sol der

 

But in my bus job I always use rout definitely not root. A root is something which has a big or small plant attached to it. But it does not describe the way to go from point A to point B. The yanks have got it right on that one.   


Overarching undertones
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  # 2289287 3-Aug-2019 18:47
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stmoloud:

Sol der


But in my bus job I always use rout definitely not root. A root is something which has a big or small plant attached to it. But it does not describe the way to go from point A to point B. The yanks have got it right on that one.   



Root can mean: A > B > A > B > A > B > A > B>A>B>A>B>A>B>A>B>ABABABAB .....

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  # 2302134 20-Aug-2019 08:55
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Then there's the way they've butchered our favourite toy into a plural form, Legos, yet they abbreviate mathematics to math instead of maths.





"I have noticed even people who claim everything is predestined, and that we can do nothing to change it, look before they cross the road." -  Stephen Hawking


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