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pdh

pdh
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  #2712903 25-May-2021 16:17
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Going to sneak in my favourite uniquely (I believe) Kiwi mispronunciation.

 

Cache (as applied to computer memory) – is a word meaning ‘temporary storage’. It’s borrowed from the concealed/protected stash of food used by explorers and hunters – cached on the way out, recovered on the homeward journey.

 

Growing up in Canada, we used it as kids. It had been in active use there for 400+ years (French & English). There’s even a town in BC called Cache Creek. But it’s always been pronounced ‘cash’. In NZ, many (most ?) pronounce it ‘caish’.

 

I’ve never figured out how that got started.


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Gurezaemon
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  #2712907 25-May-2021 16:25
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One word I really wish would come back into common use is ain't. We have all sorts of other contractions, but the one for 'I am not' is frowned upon.

 

Most of us use it casually, but steer away from it for fear of being thought ignorant.





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Stu

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  #2712912 25-May-2021 16:41
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Gurezaemon:

Paul1977:

Thanks @Stu. I personally think it's a stretch to equate that with Godwin's Law, as I doubt anyone who uses the term is genuinely making that comparison. I've been called it before and never for a second thought that that sort of comparison was being made. But the moderators set the rules, so I'm glad I clarified and didn't throw it around in this thread (I very possibly would have referred to myself as one).



I agree — I think it's a stretch, but the FUG is the FUG. It all depends on context and intent. I tend to refer to myself as a Grammar N*** and don't see anything wrong with it.
It's the difference between calling someone a nut and calling them a golf nut. One is intended to be a slur, and one isn't.


A broad-strokes ban on particular words, even if used in combination, would even mean we couldn't talk about Seinfeld's episode about the very severe soup vendor 😅



Using that phrase has always been pulled up here, since before my time with The Hammer. You'll have to take it up with a higher power. But for now, no soup for anyone.




It’s not that I’m agoraphobic, it’s just not safe to go out anymore.

 

Keep calm, and carry on posting.

 

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MadEngineer
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  #2712913 25-May-2021 16:46
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pdh:

People who say "Can I..." when they mean "May I.." - asking for permission.


I commonly respond "I imagine so.". Just to increase the joy on the planet.

That reminds me of how I feel every time someone asks via email if I can do something for them. The urge to reply ‘yes I can but do you want me to?’ is strong.




You're not on Atlantis anymore, Duncan Idaho.

Fred99
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  #2712916 25-May-2021 16:59
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Gurezaemon:

 

I tend to refer to myself as a Grammar N*** and don't see anything wrong with it.

 

 

I do.  As others point out, Godwin himself doesn't see a problem with referring to someone or something being called N***  - but when it's appropriately used and it can be reasonably argued to show that.   Hence  the BDFL decided to allow it's use in one thread where it certainly was appropriate,  I guess the blanket ban in every other thread is a lot easier than trying to argue whether use was appropriate or not.  Calling someone a  Grammar N*** isn't appropriate use, and it's hard to reasonably argue how it could ever be. 


Handle9
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  #2712917 25-May-2021 17:06
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Paul1977:

 

When people describe a hyperactive person as "hypo".

 

"That kid is really hypo". No. That kid is really HYPER!

 

 

It's right up there with guttered


Fred99
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  #2712918 25-May-2021 17:06
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My favourite mispronunciations are the words pronunciation and mispronunciation, both frequently mispronounced by people whilst they're proudly criticising how others speak.




SirHumphreyAppleby
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  #2712923 25-May-2021 17:29
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Please. This is a shortening of "if you please", ("s'il vous plait" in French), yet many people seem to think because it is polite to say please, their expectation of a desirable outcome is somehow elevated by saying it.

 

I recall debating census questions with my boss years ago. All questions were compulsory, but near the end it had a box with text saying something like "Please provide a phone number". He considered it mandatory to provide a phone number, while I interpreted it as optional. I.e. While compulsory to answer, entering nothing was a valid response to the question.

 

"Please stop on request"... someone clearly didn't think that one through.


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  #2712927 25-May-2021 17:37
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Item:

 

3) The confusion between when to use "few/fewer" and "less/lesser" bugs me. e.g. "less people turned up this year" instead of "fewer people turned up this year" 

 

 

 

 





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Rikkitic
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  #2712931 25-May-2021 17:49
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Item:

 

3) The confusion between when to use "few/fewer" and "less/lesser" bugs me. e.g. "less people turned up this year" instead of "fewer people turned up this year" 

 

 

There is less of a turnout this year.

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


Fred99
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  #2712933 25-May-2021 17:53
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

Please. This is a shortening of "if you please", ("s'il vous plait" in French), yet many people seem to think because it is polite to say please, their expectation of a desirable outcome is somehow elevated by saying it.

 

 

I'm pretty sure that's almost entirely incorrect. Oxford say it's derived from plaisir,  but that meaning has shifted from Old French  "to please" to "pleasure", originally from Latin "placere". (disclaimer: I am not a linguist and failed high school French spectacularly)

 

Also your expectation of a desirable outcome probably does have a higher chance of being realised if you do say "please".


SirHumphreyAppleby
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  #2712952 25-May-2021 18:12
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Fred99:

 

Oxford say it's derived from plaisir.

 

...

 

Also your expectation of a desirable outcome probably does have a higher chance of being realised if you do say "please".

 

 

I have no doubt the word is derived from Latin plaisir. You can't define a word using the word itself, so "Please" cannot mean "If you please", but it can be a shortening of it. This makes sense if, as OED also notes, it arrived in English via French.

 

While I'm not one to cite Wikipedia as an authoritative source, it does reference legal cases where the meaning has been debated. The examples suggest it may go either way. Studies have also shown that in some cases, please is actually more likely to lead to a less favorable outcome. Again, it depends on the situation.


Fred99
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  #2712957 25-May-2021 18:31
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

Studies have also shown that in some cases, please is actually more likely to lead to a less favorable outcome. Again, it depends on the situation.

 

 

Didn't work for Oliver Twist, despite his gruelling plea.

 

Do Americans get knighthoods these days, or did you miss the "u" in favourable?


SirHumphreyAppleby
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  #2712961 25-May-2021 18:44
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Fred99:

 

Do Americans get knighthoods these days, or did you miss the "u" in favourable?

 

 

That was a genuine balls-up on my part.


Rikkitic
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  #2712970 25-May-2021 19:20
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SirHumphreyAppleby:

 

That was a genuine balls-up on my part.

 

 

Be careful. Someone may want to shave them.

 

 





Plesse igmore amd axxept applogies in adbance fir anu typos

 


 


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