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blackjack17
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  #2831162 13-Dec-2021 08:32
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https://www.dogsnz.org.nz/dogs/breeders 

 

 

 

List of registered breeders for a range of pedigree dogs.

 

Dog prices have gone right up over the past couple of years.  For instance expect to pay at least $3-4000 for a lab.





rjh

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  #2831165 13-Dec-2021 08:39
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Once you've worked through the ethical issues (like, we already have too many dogs in NZ, and the majority of Trademe and Facebook breeders are disgusting mercenaries) and the economic issues (cost of food, repairs etc) and the practical issues(do you really have time for a dog, will anybody be home during the day - dogs are social animals) then consider a rehome or rescue.

 

We have 2x rehomed greyhounds - and we've fostered well over 20. Some of these are stunning looking dogs, many are really well behaved and generally they are not too bright - so they are not demanding. They all have a known pedigree, they are inexpensive, they are lazy and do NOT require a lot of running, and some are happy to live with cats.

 

https://sunsetspock.home.blog/


Handsomedan
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  #2831216 13-Dec-2021 09:45
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We got a dog for free.** 

 

Person at work knew someone, who was friends with someone who was familiar with a person who needed to rehome their dog. 

 

Long story short, we got a 3 year old Bichon/Shih Tzu cross, who is still convinced he's a human. 

 

He's getting on a bit now, but he's a very good boy, unless he's on a leash and meets another dog. That's not fun. 10/10 times he'll attack the larger dog. But we know that and keep him tightly held and away from the other dog - especially if it's a large one. 

 

We were lucky - he was fairly well trained (with the exception of being allowed on furniture and being a bed-hog), but he's amazing company. 

 

I say we were lucky, because he's not scared by thunder, or fireworks or loud cars. He like nearly everyone, but does sense something in some people that he'll growl at and doesn't like a hoodie-wearing person if the hood is up. He's cuddly, but independent and fairly self-sufficient. He does scrounge a lot and is driven by his belly. He's a creature of habit - has some routines we can't and won't shake him of...like going to bed at 9pm, racing down the hallway to enjoy having his hair dried with my wife, when she starts up the blowdryer for herself, etc. 

 

He was clearly well-loved and well socialised (as he will literally go home with anyone!). Couldn't be happier. 

 

Also - make sure you have somewhere to put the dog when you go away...they really do make holidaying and or a simple overnight stay somewhere much, much harder. I'm lucky that my in-laws love our wee pooch and will take him for as long we need them to. And he's happy to go. 

 

 

 

**We may not have paid anything for him, but pet insurance has rescued us a couple of times - he has has dental issues, cruciate ligament issues, a few minor lesions etc. 

 

Dogs are expensive pets, both monetarily and emotionally. They are very much a part of the family and you can't help but fall in love with them, but they will inevitably cost you a fortune and also at some stage in their short life, break your heart. 





Handsome Dan Has Spoken.
Handsome Dan needs to stop adding three dots to every sentence...

 

Handsome Dan does not currently have a side hustle as the mascot for Yale 

 

 

 

*Gladly accepting donations...




1101
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  #2831217 13-Dec-2021 09:48
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pedigree dogs & cats are a disgusting practice for those without morals , or those who dont care about
the well being of the animal.

 

Pedigree & purebreed can have ongoing issues , and a shorter less healthy life.
When a pet has issues breathing , due to its pedigree , is pedigree/purebreed something thats more important than the animals health ?

 

Why not buy a dog that will have a long & healthy life, instead of some inbreed pedigree ?


MikeAqua
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  #2831226 13-Dec-2021 10:07
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1101:

 

pedigree dogs & cats are a disgusting practice for those without morals , or those who dont care about
the well being of the animal.

 

Pedigree & purebreed can have ongoing issues , and a shorter less healthy life.
When a pet has issues breathing , due to its pedigree , is pedigree/purebreed something thats more important than the animals health ?

 

Why not buy a dog that will have a long & healthy life, instead of some inbreed pedigree ?

 

 

That's a bit of an over-generalisation.  There are ethical pedigree breeders and there are plenty of breeds that don't have issues. 

 

I've had four pedigree dogs in my life.  All lived long, happy and healthy lives.    My most recent dog was registered pedigree lab, and was the most robust dogs I've ever known.  Labs can develop hip dysplasia, but any reputable breeder will give you an HD score for the litter they are selling.

 

There are breeds I wouldn't go near, because they have problems bred into them.





Mike


networkn
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  #2831230 13-Dec-2021 10:15
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1101:

 

pedigree dogs & cats are a disgusting practice for those without morals , or those who dont care about
the well being of the animal.

 

Pedigree & purebreed can have ongoing issues , and a shorter less healthy life.
When a pet has issues breathing , due to its pedigree , is pedigree/purebreed something thats more important than the animals health ?

 

Why not buy a dog that will have a long & healthy life, instead of some inbreed pedigree ?

 

 

Jeepers. That certainly isn't true of all pedigree breeders nor animals. My German Shepherd was not inbred, something the breeder was at pains to relay to me. Like any industry, there are people who will take shortcuts and exploit opportunities for profit at the detriment of customers and products. I don't feel it's reasonable to tar them all with the same brush. My GSD lived 13 years, despite having some medical issues, as all aging animals eventually do. Most consider that a very decent innings. He was well-loved and a fantastic animal. We were lucky to have him.

 

 


rjh

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  #2831284 13-Dec-2021 11:16
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1101:

 

pedigree dogs & cats are a disgusting practice for those without morals , or those who dont care about
the well being of the animal.

 

Pedigree & purebreed can have ongoing issues , and a shorter less healthy life.
When a pet has issues breathing , due to its pedigree , is pedigree/purebreed something thats more important than the animals health ?

 

Why not buy a dog that will have a long & healthy life, instead of some inbreed pedigree ?

 

 

That is completely incorrect, there is nothing wrong with pedigree at all.

 

There are serious problems with some breeds, usually the most trendy and popular ones at any moment. The current trend to short nosed breeds is abhorrent - these dogs can barely breathe, overheat, and suffer from other things like inverted eyelids. Add to that that so many dogs in NZ are actually obese, life as a short nose breed is pretty miserable.

 

For example, all greyhounds have a detailed pedigree; they definitely do not have trouble breathing; they are designed for it, and in fact their ability to oxygenate and pump blood is astounding (and even their blood is unique). They might have a tendency to dental issues, and very thin skin, but overall these are a healthy breed with few other issues.

 

Pedigree in itself is not bad, as you portray it.




neb

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  #2831602 13-Dec-2021 16:47
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colinuu:

Also I agree with another comment about pet insurance.

 

 

Another issue with that is the bigger the dog, the bigger the medical bills. Even outside of ACC-subsidised stuff I think it's still probably cheaper to get an operation done on a human than on a large dog.

neb

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  #2831604 13-Dec-2021 16:51
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blackjack17:

Dog prices have gone right up over the past couple of years.  For instance expect to pay at least $3-4000 for a lab.

 

 

Or you could just get lucky, a friend of mine adopted a labrador cross as a puppy from a shelter that ended up a purebred (or close to it) staffie when it grew up. Lovely dog once he'd got over his initial puppy enthusiasm for nearly bowling over visitors in his joy to greet them.

shk292
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  #2831607 13-Dec-2021 16:57
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I just wanted to add that we got our last (cross-breed) dog off a Trademe seller who was obviously a dog-lover with very well cared for family pets, one of which had had a litter of pups.  Our dog has turned out to be just right, as has her litter-mate who is now owned by a friend.

 

So not all generalisations are valid; I wouldn't rule out Trademe sellers but I would advise a visit and inspection before committing to anything


networkn
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  #2831619 13-Dec-2021 17:08
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There is a thing about training dogs, and it's the traffic light system. Dogs have a prey drive. If they see a cat for example, they are for about 1-2 seconds in the green zone when they assess things. In this phase, they are entirely distractable and you can move their attention to another thing, like a ball, or a treat. They move to orange after that for possibly another second or so. They are less distractable, but it's still possible to divert their attention. From then on in, they are locked and loaded, they are red and the only thing that matters is prey. At this point, they are not listening and you'll have them straining on the lead. It takes some timing and practice, but if you can distract the dog in the green zone, and give them a treat immediately to reward their behaviour, then later in life, you'll be able to distract them more easily as they become conditioned to you being more important than anything else.

 

The timing of treats/consequences is also massively important. If your dog craps on the carpet, and you see it, a telling off means it will associate the behaviour with the consequence. However, if you come from work, and your dog races to see you all happy and excited, and you spot the poo on the carpet, and you explode, the dog will think that you are blowing up because he came running over happy to see you. He will not associate the poo with the consequence. Likewise, if you are teaching them new behaviour, like to sit on command, the SECOND the dog gets the behaviour correct, you reward, either with a treat, or some happy pats and cuddles.

 

Like kids, dogs can be set up for success or failure. If you drag a tired kid around a shopping center for 6 hours and they won't behave, you have set the kid up for failure, it's the same with pets. Set them up to succeed. It takes a load of patience.

 

As someone else said, in 95% of cases, if your dog misbehaves, it's a failure on your part, not on theirs.

 

 


rjh

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  #2831622 13-Dec-2021 17:11
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neb:
colinuu:

 

Also I agree with another comment about pet insurance.

 

Another issue with that is the bigger the dog, the bigger the medical bills. ...

 

Doesn't have to be that way. Sometimes people are worried about taking on older greyhounds, due to expensive vet bills. Somebody pragmatically said, there are no expensive vet bills for old greyhounds.

 

No shortage of greyhounds either, unfortunately.


Batman

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  #2831625 13-Dec-2021 17:19
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networkn:

There is a thing about training dogs, and it's the traffic light system. Dogs have a prey drive. If they see a cat for example, they are for about 1-2 seconds in the green zone when they assess things. In this phase, they are entirely distractable and you can move their attention to another thing, like a ball, or a treat. They move to orange after that for possibly another second or so. They are less distractable, but it's still possible to divert their attention. From then on in, they are locked and loaded, they are red and the only thing that matters is prey. At this point, they are not listening and you'll have them straining on the lead. It takes some timing and practice, but if you can distract the dog in the green zone, and give them a treat immediately to reward their behaviour, then later in life, you'll be able to distract them more easily as they become conditioned to you being more important than anything else.


The timing of treats/consequences is also massively important. If your dog craps on the carpet, and you see it, a telling off means it will associate the behaviour with the consequence. However, if you come from work, and your dog races to see you all happy and excited, and you spot the poo on the carpet, and you explode, the dog will think that you are blowing up because he came running over happy to see you. He will not associate the poo with the consequence. Likewise, if you are teaching them new behaviour, like to sit on command, the SECOND the dog gets the behaviour correct, you reward, either with a treat, or some happy pats and cuddles.


Like kids, dogs can be set up for success or failure. If you drag a tired kid around a shopping center for 6 hours and they won't behave, you have set the kid up for failure, it's the same with pets. Set them up to succeed. It takes a load of patience.


As someone else said, in 95% of cases, if your dog misbehaves, it's a failure on your part, not on theirs.


 



Excellent tips thanks




Involuntary autocorrect in operation on mobile device. Apologies in advance.


JayADee
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  #2832703 15-Dec-2021 09:29
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The greyhound rehoming idea is a good one. They are lovely dogs. Or think about adopting an older dog.

 

Don't underestimate the horrors that are the puppy and adolescent stages. Most people if they are going to give up their dogs do it during adolescence just before the dog starts to settle down and become the dog they were probably imagining when they got it. It's a steep learning curve how to manage behaviour and teach a puppy with positive methods. Not hard but do your reading and be prepared to be very patient and put up with needle sharp puppy teeth for a while. And some things can’t be rushed like teething and potty training. There is no taking a day off when you have a dog either unless you're careful to get a 'lazy' breed who doesn’t mind a skipped walk now and then in bad weather and there aren’t many breeds like that. A bored, under exercised dog does not make a happy companion. My husband and I both walk our dog every day and organise play dates for him to get him enough exercise.

 

My sister got her first dog about 5 years ago from a couple who had a baby then put their dog in their basement on pretty much a full time basis. I guess suddenly the dog wasn’t interesting any more. The lady cleaning for them felt sorry for him and knew my sister was looking and hooked them up. He's made a great pet for her family. He's looked after by her adult son, ex-husband and herself. They all pitch in looking after him so they can care for the dog (who is mostly a black lab).  My sister has a small yard, but has a park across the street and another behind them which is handy. He also spends time at the ex husband’s house. The grown son takes the dog swimming. He was a perfect first dog for them. Already knew all the basics and then some. Came with his bed and gear.

We have always had dogs in pairs and a large fenced yard for them but we have downsized to one dog now that we are retired and the other ones have passed. Two are too expensive.

 

Dogs are a lot of work every day and expensive to own. Unless you have the money and time to commit and a well fenced yard it's better to go visit someone else’s!

 

 

 

PS never tell a dog off for going toilet in the house. Ignore the behaviour and clean it up.
instead, anticipate when they need to go. After every meal or drink, in the morning, before bed and as a young pup pretty much every 2 hours. Scoop them up and put them outside and praise heavily while the dog is going potty outside. 'Good! Good Toilet! Gooood boy!' etc. You'll have a rock solid toileting dog who will never go in the house when they are old enough to control their bladder. Worked perfectly on all 5 of mine. I taught our latest one to bark to get in and out but most dogs will naturally let you know through body language, barking or whining once they know outside is for going. What you don’t want is to let the dog out when it jumps up at the door unless you want a destroyed door.

 

Lastly, even registered breeders are not a sure bet. They're in it, a lot of them, to make money. I am not going to recount my full experiences with one but I'd never buy a dog from them. They deliberately rehomed one that was returned to them knowing it was sick without telling the new owners what it had and tried rehoming another which was temperamentally unsound without disclosing that. 

 

I got a lovely dog from the pound once who was a great addition to our family. Our latest was sourced locally, he's unregistered. He was bred by an owner who wanted another dog from her own and we knew the owners of both the Mum and dad dogs. So yeah, it means he didn’t have the health checks a registered dog would have but he's also less of an unknown than a pound dog (which I would have been happy with but the husband wanted this guy)


JayADee
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  #2832983 15-Dec-2021 17:26
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