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Topic # 31534 21-Mar-2009 10:13
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I quite often buy an item at a store for say $300, then the very next day they put it on special for $200, and stuff like that. Its very frustrating. Sometimes I get wild but do nothing, other times I might go back and they return it and resell it back to me at the promotion price. I assume when they do that they are doing it as an act of good faith?

The latest one which has me fuming was I bought a new fax, and a particular chain store sells the consumables for $35. Then today, the day after I bought it, they hiked the price up to $48 a box. If I had known yesterday they were going to put the price up like that, then I would not have bought that particular model and would have bought another brand. As I said I am fuming, but don't think I will do anything about it, it will just sit in the box unopened. But would that be grounds for return?

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  Reply # 202484 21-Mar-2009 12:03
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Re; Lower prices: Running special promotional pricing is an extremely common and standard marketing practice.
Re; Higher price: Have you any idea of the state of the New Zealand Dollar lately?







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Reply # 202807 23-Mar-2009 15:00
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Hate it when that happens, sounds like you got well and truely faxed on that deal!



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  Reply # 202843 23-Mar-2009 17:31
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As someone who hobby revolves around items not manufactured in NZ, I import a lot of stuff myself (on a weekly basis), plus buy from others who are importers. And yes I look at the NZ vs US dollar graphs/charts regularly so I am aware of the current rates and trends, especially over last 6 months :(

I have seen chain stores sneak their prices up here and there, and I also am aware that it will take time for the exchange rate to filter through all pricing everywhere, but consumable items have only increased around 10% (The ones I buy for my equipment), but this fax one went up 40%, thats a pretty chunky increase.

In this case it does not worry me any longer, I have since found an awesome website where I can get compatable consumable items, inclusive of overnight courier (in NZ), inclusive of GST, for less than half the cost.

Maybe its just that as a student I find a price decrease for $100 the very next day hard to grin and accept, I'm not that impatient I couldn't wait an extra day to save $100, and I'm not that rich to say "who cares, they're still printing money".

If a store is happy to go to the hassle to keep a customer happy to match a compeditors price, then surely the same applies when 30 minutes before closing they make a sale, that the next day they (I assume here) know will be $100 less?

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  Reply # 202921 23-Mar-2009 22:56
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i would like to send a word to sky and isp providers ,about there new promotions for new customers, as someone who  signed up and recieved nothing, to see a month later all the freebies offered to people who join now , Sky seems to be the worse, free installs, free movies all sorts and all i have recieved from sky is free rialto for a month and i hate rialto, maybe they could remember the old customers now and again




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  Reply # 202930 23-Mar-2009 23:30
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vexxxboy: i would like to send a word to sky and isp providers ,about there new promotions for new customers, as someone who  signed up and recieved nothing, to see a month later all the freebies offered to people who join now , Sky seems to be the worse, free installs, free movies all sorts and all i have recieved from sky is free rialto for a month and i hate rialto, maybe they could remember the old customers now and again


LOL. first of all you're probably signed up on a 12 month contract which means it will cost you money to disconnect, secondly, its not like you can threaten to go to another provider.  Two options: SKY or NOSKY.  If your contract has already expired, wait until the next big promo time (e.g. all black match, new HD product launch etc), ditch sky the day/week before then resign up to a new term contract on the new deal.




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  Reply # 202989 24-Mar-2009 10:23
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Comradehunt: I quite often buy an item at a store for say $300, then the very next day they put it on special for $200, and stuff like that. Its very frustrating. Sometimes I get wild but do nothing, other times I might go back and they return it and resell it back to me at the promotion price. I assume when they do that they are doing it as an act of good faith?

The latest one which has me fuming was I bought a new fax, and a particular chain store sells the consumables for $35. Then today, the day after I bought it, they hiked the price up to $48 a box. If I had known yesterday they were going to put the price up like that, then I would not have bought that particular model and would have bought another brand. As I said I am fuming, but don't think I will do anything about it, it will just sit in the box unopened. But would that be grounds for return?



Luck of the draw really. Sucks but that's how it is.

Happened to me with my first bed when I was a teenager. Dropped by $300 the following week.




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  Reply # 202995 24-Mar-2009 10:39
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BurningBeard: Luck of the draw really. Sucks but that's how it is.


Yep I certainly have had a bad week with retailers. Also bought a new freezer last week, it arrived late yesterday afternoon. I watched the guy carefully unload it, the box looked in top condition, so I signed the form. Then my flatmate and I opened the box, to find large dents in the side and back.

When that sort of thing happens I think
BurningBeard: Luck of the draw really. Sucks but that's how it is.
and usually I would do nothing. I'm not one usually to whinge to retailers about things unless they have such a major fault that means they can't be used as intended. In this case I'm disappointed I have paid new price for a freezer that looks like it just came from an auction.

However in this case even though I can ignore the damage, as I'm a bit of a wuss and always get bullied by retailers, I think I will have to do something as if anything ever does go wrong during the 6 years it has a warranty for, they will shoot the claim down as "abuse" of the item as it looks like its fallen down a flight of stairs. As I do not work at the factory that made it I have no idea if the damage is 100% cosmetic, or whether the damage to the coils/fins/walls means the unit will not operate efficiently or will fail prematurely, etc.

So joy, back I go in an hour :(

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  Reply # 203086 24-Mar-2009 18:53
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solution: only buy stuff on special

you still run the risk of seeing an even BETTER special, but you improved the odds in your favour heaps :)




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  Reply # 203089 24-Mar-2009 19:03
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Comradehunt: I quite often buy an item at a store for say $300, then the very next day they put it on special for $200, and stuff like that. Its very frustrating. Sometimes I get wild but do nothing, other times I might go back and they return it and resell it back to me at the promotion price. I assume when they do that they are doing it as an act of good faith?


Unless the store has a policy, yes. I think some stores such as DSE and L V Martin will match the price with a refund if there's a special up to some days after your purchase.





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  Reply # 203153 24-Mar-2009 22:43
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Yes, if you make an in store purchase and the price is lowered within 14 days (I think), you can take it back and ask for the difference back. However, I have only seen this happen with items under $100 such as kitchen appliances/homewares etc. I'm aware of both the Warehouse and Briscoes doing this, so probably only the bigger chain type stores would do so (maybe LV Martin/DSE/Harvey Norman etc).

I guess, the other option is to ask the store if they offer the difference back if the price drops (once again, there is a time limit on this).

If a laptop drops in price, say $200 a week after you buy it, you could always return it and get your money back and then purchase at the lower price? Hmmm, looking at this on the consumer site, it may not be possible to do that. Of course, you can always give it a go.

I guess it is important to establish with the retailer what happens if an item does go on special within a week or two. Or only buy when things are on special. Or buy online (where it is often cheaper to do so anyway).

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  Reply # 203168 25-Mar-2009 00:46
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The DSE 14 day "Satisfaction Guarantee" could be invoked provided everything is as new, without even mentioning the price change.

From the DSE website
Shop with confidence with our 'Change of Mind' Policy 14 day money back guarantee. Where you change your mind, goods can only be accepted for refund or exchange in unmarked original condition and packaging complete with all instruction books, accessories etc. If a mail order item, we will refund your money - less transportation costs except where goods are faulty. Check with your Dick Smith Electronics store.



Please note: Refunds on Change of Mind purchases do not apply to books, batteries, semi-conductors, Philips shavers, video games, DVDs or computer software.

Incorrect or faulty goods returned for repair or exchange must be accompanied by a sales docket or proof of purchase. Please note: the provisions of the Consumer Guarantees Act will not apply where the goods are acquired for business purposes.

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  Reply # 203947 29-Mar-2009 10:27
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I have certainly found consumer law more biased to the retailers here in NZ than in the UK.




There, for example, if a retailer incorrectly prices an item and you take it to the till, they can only charge you the price shown, not the real price. I once bought an item that should have cost the equivalent of NZ$1000 and paid the equivalent of NZ$250 because the store had the wrong ticket on it! I believe that here they are allowed to rectify their error. Also, they are obliged to give you a refund if teh goods are faulty, not as described etc and you do not even need a receipt - you must prove that you bought it from them if they ask you to though. If you buy online, you can send stuff back for any reason - even changing your mind - provided that you have not used whatever it is.




Also, credit card issuers in the UK are entirely liable for sorting out damaged, faulty or undelivered goods paid for with their cards, which makes life very much better for the consumer!! Under section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, the card company is ‘jointly and severally liable’. This means it is equally responsible along with the retailer or trader for the goods or service, and you can contact the card company to sort out your problem. Something NZ would benefit from, I think.




I have found claiming under warranty can be a real trial here too - I had a massive argument with a well known whiteware company in NZ about a dishwasher fault after their repair company tried to claim that the presence of a coffee bean in the pump was not a warranty issue. I wrote them a very stiff letter pointing out that there was no way that an item the size of a coffee bean ought to be able to get anywhere near the pump if the filtration system was properly designed and suggested that they sue me for the $85 if they wanted to discuss the matter in court.




Funnily enough, I never heard another word....





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  Reply # 203967 29-Mar-2009 12:41
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Geektastic: I have certainly found consumer law more biased to the retailers here in NZ than in the UK.


There, for example, if a retailer incorrectly prices an item and you take it to the till, they can only charge you the price shown, not the real price. I once bought an item that should have cost the equivalent of NZ$1000 and paid the equivalent of NZ$250 because the store had the wrong ticket on it! I believe that here they are allowed to rectify their error. Also, they are obliged to give you a refund if teh goods are faulty, not as described etc and you do not even need a receipt - you must prove that you bought it from them if they ask you to though. If you buy online, you can send stuff back for any reason - even changing your mind - provided that you have not used whatever it is.


From my understanding please correct me if incorrect:

Prices listed on an item or in nearby signage are an "offer" and if you take an item to thr counter they have every right to advise you that price is incorrect or they forgot the sale sign and offer you the item at the higher correct price. Must retailers honour the shelf price unless it's something like "a plasma TV for $299"

Shops with "Refund Policy" signs or simply "No Refund, No Exchange" that provide only the minimum required under law or nothing in the form of the latter. there are many retailers that provide much better service so I suggest giving them your business.

I really like the "faulty goods" and the "online clause" nothing worse than something failing and having to buy an alternative before waiting till the standard retailer is open/in vicinity I have often ended up with two of the same thing in this scnenario and had to sell on Trademe the second item.
Also vague desriptions/poor photos seem to be a bit too common here and that would bring many into line.

1-day is a good example of detailed product info and great photography, Ferrit was the opposite.


Also, credit card issuers in the UK are entirely liable for sorting out damaged, faulty or undelivered goods paid for with their cards, which makes life very much better for the consumer!! Under section 75 of the Consumer Credit Act, the card company is ‘jointly and severally liable’. This means it is equally responsible along with the retailer or trader for the goods or service, and you can contact the card company to sort out your problem. Something NZ would benefit from, I think.


I have found it very hard to get a chargeback here, I never bothered when I learnt the process but luckily got my money back.



I have found claiming under warranty can be a real trial here too - I had a massive argument with a well known whiteware company in NZ about a dishwasher fault after their repair company tried to claim that the presence of a coffee bean in the pump was not a warranty issue. I wrote them a very stiff letter pointing out that there was no way that an item the size of a coffee bean ought to be able to get anywhere near the pump if the filtration system was properly designed and suggested that they sue me for the $85 if they wanted to discuss the matter in court.

Funnily enough, I never heard another word....


It wasn't a Dishdrawer by any chance was it? They have "revised" the gratings a few times.

Agreed though it does depend largely on the company and/or "extended" warranty.

I have had sour experiences with IUG but have had a good result with Toshiba both direct company (Laptop) and indirect (Projector) and Sony (boombox Stereo and video camera) and the repair team were very helpful with some technical questions.



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  Reply # 203968 29-Mar-2009 12:48
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Hey Geektastic - having recently moved to the UK, I've found it quite interesting to compare the retail experience with NZ. Having checked out PC World, I've seen a distinct lack of service, which doesn't seem to do them much favours (or seem to bother them too much!)

However, I am pretty certain if a marked price is wrong, the store doen't have to supply at that price (assuming, of course, they notice the price is wrong in the first place). However, they may still sell at the incorrect price to keep the customer happy.

One recent instance I'm aware of is play.com mispricing an Xbox game recently and many people placing an order. A few days later they all received emails telling them the price of £1 was incorrect but the game was still available at a discounted price of £30 (instead of the usual £40). The forum this was posted on had the majority of people taking the 'it was too good to be true' approach (but worth a go), although there were a couple of people who were going to challenge it and would 'take further action' to get what they had ordered.

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  Reply # 203988 29-Mar-2009 15:18
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paradoxsm:


Prices listed on an item or in nearby signage are an "offer" and if you take an item to thr counter they have every right to advise you that price is incorrect or they forgot the sale sign and offer you the item at the higher correct price. Must retailers honour the shelf price unless it's something like "a plasma TV for $299"



Yes, If they have a sign advertising a tv for $1999 instead of 2999 they must honor their sign.

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