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  Reply # 562522 29-Dec-2011 16:31
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You really have to ROFL at the testimonials - a customer who has no historical bills "saves" $50 in the first month. Get real.

BTW if anybody wants to send me $50 I'll ship a bottle of my special Vodka off to you for New Years Eve. I guarantee you have a great night and won't get a hangover.



Happy Customer #2 – Tells how he took his Power Panda with him after the Christchurch Earthquakes

I first got the Power Panda when living in Christchurch. When the time came to move back to Auckland we had no hesitation in moving the Power Panda with us. The first month a saving of over $50 was noticed. Our home has a 2 year old, 3 teenagers and 4 adults, and the shower is working hard every day. I highly recommended the Power Panda to all and I am happy to talk to any prospective Power Panda user.

Noel Andrews, Mt Wellington



 


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  Reply # 562523 29-Dec-2011 16:39
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Just realised I got the link wrong to the Power Panda Total saver website. Here is the correct link, and to the detailed technical explanation. If you want to skip the silly analogies, there are some precise technical claims near the bottom of the article which can be tested on a math basis:

http://thetotalsaver.com/benefit-from-using-the-power-panda-total-saver

Personally, I think the claims are incorrect.




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  Reply # 562529 29-Dec-2011 16:47
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After you're read the link above explaining how they think it world the following link might be well worth reading - how it really works!

http://www.nlcpr.com/Deceptions1.php

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  Reply # 562531 29-Dec-2011 16:48
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A CE mark means nothing, just that the seller believes that it meets CE requirements, really they should be caveat emptor as there has been no formal test process done like the much superior UL testing.




Richard rich.ms

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  Reply # 562548 29-Dec-2011 17:06
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richms: A CE mark means nothing, just that the seller believes that it meets CE requirements, really they should be caveat emptor as there has been no formal test process done like the much superior UL testing.


Presumably this declaration still has to be filed somewhere to be effective?

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  Reply # 562549 29-Dec-2011 17:09
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gzt:
richms: A CE mark means nothing, just that the seller believes that it meets CE requirements, really they should be caveat emptor as there has been no formal test process done like the much superior UL testing.


Presumably this declaration still has to be filed somewhere to be effective?


You would think so, but no. Any crap out of asia can be imported and sold into europe if it has CE written on the side of it. No CE, no sale.

As it has no legal meaning in NZ, I expect that you could put it on anything here and be fine.




Richard rich.ms



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  Reply # 562590 29-Dec-2011 18:09
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richms: A CE mark means nothing, just that the seller believes that it meets CE requirements, really they should be caveat emptor as there has been no formal test process done like the much superior UL testing.


Interestingly enough, the CE mark we see on most things from China, actually means "china export"
http://www.labnol.org/gadgets/ce-marking-on-electronics/13845/

But does look annoyingly close to the CE mark on most electronics






I have moved across the ditch.  Now residing in Melbourne as a VOIP/Video Technical Trainer/Engineer. 

gzt

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  Reply # 574186 27-Jan-2012 17:34
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Just updated my energy saving site with a link to the product you located on the sourcing website.

I have also put a strong warning note there about safety.

My feeling is that when fitted with a residential plug as shown in the CHT-001 picture, this device could be dangerous in the same way that the Go4Green Energy Smart Device was found to be dangerous by Consumer Magazine and NZ's electricity regulator.

That device contained capacitors which were able to discharge through the device's plug and shock the user after the power was removed. This CHT-001 device is similar, but probably contains even larger capacitors therefore leading to an increased shock hazard when fitted with a residential plug.




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