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  Reply # 790321 1-Apr-2013 21:16
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richms: Im wondering how they will handle the 24 way split with multiple services into a single house, since they seem to be allowing for only 1 service in the 2.4/24 calculation. Guess they will just have to hope that there are sufficiant technophobes and non flatting houses to make up for it.


You'll only get a single fibre connection into a single house, at this point. I think anything more than 100mbit/50mbit requires a whole different connection?


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  Reply # 790322 1-Apr-2013 21:29
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There are 4 ethernet ports on the ONT for providing 4 different services. Also if my flatmate wants fiber they will have to get their own ONT when it becomes available. Thats what I was told when I asked about getting multiple fibers in for multiple ISPs.

Ideally I would like 2 ONTs on 2 different splitters to get some redundancy between my internet connections. And I dont want my internet to go out if the flatmates ISP advices to turn things off and on again.




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  Reply # 790324 1-Apr-2013 21:30
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richms: There are 4 ethernet ports on the ONT for providing 4 different services. Also if my flatmate wants fiber they will have to get their own ONT when it becomes available. Thats what I was told when I asked about getting multiple fibers in for multiple ISPs.

Ideally I would like 2 ONTs on 2 different splitters to get some redundancy between my internet connections. And I dont want my internet to go out if the flatmates ISP advices to turn things off and on again.


Hmm, you mean their own router that will hang off a the 2nd port on the ONT?


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  Reply # 790325 1-Apr-2013 21:33
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No, I mean if the ISP wants them to power cycle the ONT when the internet breaks I dont want to have mine going down etc. Seems stupid to have a common point of failure among 2 connections that would cost the same if provided without the common point of failure.




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  Reply # 793402 4-Apr-2013 19:14
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  As per countless other threads here, post your modem connection stats, do you have a splitter etc etc.


I have a splitter on the phone (only have one phone wired in).

Hmmm, not sure what stats you mean.

These?

Statistics -- WAN

ServiceVPI/VCIProtocolInterfaceReceivedTransmitted    BytesPktsErrsDropsBytesPktsErrsDropspppoa_0_0_100_10/0/100PPPoAppp_0_0_100_12147483647430835430019601797032685202800
These?

Statistics -- ADSL

Mode:ADSL2+ Type:Interleave Line Coding:Trellis On Status:No Defect Link Power State:L0   DownstreamUpstreamSNR Margin (dB):11.9 12.7 Attenuation (dB):6.0 1.9 Output Power (dBm):18.4 12.4 Attainable Rate (Kbps):21948 993 Rate (Kbps):17233 993 MSGc (number of bytes in overhead channel message):61 16 B (number of bytes in Mux Data Frame):42 30 M (number of Mux Data Frames in FEC Data Frame):1 1 T (Mux Data Frames over sync bytes):12 3 R (number of check bytes in FEC Data Frame):8 0 S (ratio of FEC over PMD Data Frame length):0.0797 0.9880 L (number of bits in PMD Data Frame):5120 251 D (interleaver depth):320 1 Delay (msec):6 0  Super Frames:271734360 268435455 Super Frame Errors:22 14 RS Words:3726060878 0 RS Correctable Errors:434867 0 RS Uncorrectable Errors:69 N/A  HEC Errors:10 246869 OCD Errors:0 0 LCD Errors:0 0 Total Cells:815671790 1873468140 Data Cells:1549460649 190489481 Bit Errors:0 18680452  Total ES:17 3461 Total SES:0 718 Total UAS:55 18471 




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  Reply # 793407 4-Apr-2013 19:28
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the service from the ONTs are designed to have up to 4 connections on them (one of each ethernet port).

If the ISP wants they can design and pay for(and the customer can) a 1G/1G connection so in theory as far as I know you can have 4 * 1G connections on the ONTS

the ONTs are very reliable compared to peoples routers and shouldn't need to be rebooted ever basically.

I think the problem at the moment last time I heard adding a second connection onto the ONT from a different ISP (or even the same ISP) wasn't 100% sorted out yet.''

You could have something like (in theory)
Sky (connected to sky decoder) - Port 1 Ethernet
ISP Internet - Port 2 Ethernet
Alarm Service - Port 3
Your Phone Provider - ATA Ports

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  Reply # 794923 8-Apr-2013 11:54
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LennonNZ: The ONTs are very reliable compared to peoples routers and shouldn't need to be rebooted ever basically.


Thing that scares me about the one in my place is not the ONT, but the power supply for the ONT. A fairly generic-looking wall-wart with a very proprietary plug on the end of it. Certainly nothing that would be user-replaceable in a panicked 4:55pm Sunday afternoon dash to Dick Smith's...

If that little power supply dies, goodbye to ANYTHING that's running through the ONT. (And my particular problem, hello to a very sulky 11 year old suddenly deprived of her YouTube fix...)

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  Reply # 794930 8-Apr-2013 12:12
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Thing that scares me about the one in my place is not the ONT, but the power supply for the ONT. A fairly generic-looking wall-wart with a very proprietary plug on the end of it. Certainly nothing that would be user-replaceable in a panicked 4:55pm Sunday afternoon dash to Dick Smith's...

If that little power supply dies, goodbye to ANYTHING that's running through the ONT. (And my particular problem, hello to a very sulky 11 year old suddenly deprived of her YouTube fix...)


The Chorus ONT uses a 12 volt 1 amp power pack, so you could buy a generic spare if necessary. But you are in more danger of a mains power failure and in this respect a UPS would be a better investment.

I am surprised the ISP's offering UFB are not marketting the sale of a UPS for the ONT more aggressively. A bulk UPS purchase could make them some easy money up front.

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  Reply # 794931 8-Apr-2013 12:15
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Having the internet work during a power failure is the primary reason I'm considering UFB. Having a UPS is obviously essential, for the networking equipment and for the device you're accessing it from.

Can that stuff be put into a roof cavity, or will the summer heat and winter cold kill it? What about if it's in an insulated box up there? Perhaps a box with a thermostat controlled fan, though that would let the cold in during winter.




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  Reply # 794937 8-Apr-2013 12:29
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timmmay: Having the internet work during a power failure is the primary reason I'm considering UFB. Having a UPS is obviously essential, for the networking equipment and for the device you're accessing it from.

Can that stuff be put into a roof cavity, or will the summer heat and winter cold kill it? What about if it's in an insulated box up there? Perhaps a box with a thermostat controlled fan, though that would let the cold in during winter.


I personally believe we don't see big enough differences in temperature to worry these devices. Most UPS's have the ability to change the batteries so for longevity you could remove the standard lead acid (which most of the cheaper ones have) and put in fancy dry cells.
We just use cheap dynamix UPS's most of the time but proactive maintenance is definitely a requirement. I would suggest every 2-3 years the batteries need changing. 
  

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  Reply # 794949 8-Apr-2013 12:38
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timmmay: Having the internet work during a power failure is the primary reason I'm considering UFB. Having a UPS is obviously essential, for the networking equipment and for the device you're accessing it from.

Can that stuff be put into a roof cavity, or will the summer heat and winter cold kill it? What about if it's in an insulated box up there? Perhaps a box with a thermostat controlled fan, though that would let the cold in during winter.


A home UPS should be regarded as a very brief emergency power supply backup, not a substitute for mains power so you can carry on continuing using your PC as usual.  The UPS should be used to save your open data and shutdown the PC gracefully - even small UPS models include software to detect a mains failure and then shut down a PC after a user-determined interval - say 10 minutes. You don't want the PC shut down too soon in case the mains failure is only a few minutes. The software can also regularly test the condition of the batteries.

A UPS connected to an ONT should really be seen first as a means of keeps your landline VOIP phone working during a mains power failure.

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  Reply # 794955 8-Apr-2013 12:50
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gustov:
timmmay: Having the internet work during a power failure is the primary reason I'm considering UFB. Having a UPS is obviously essential, for the networking equipment and for the device you're accessing it from.

Can that stuff be put into a roof cavity, or will the summer heat and winter cold kill it? What about if it's in an insulated box up there? Perhaps a box with a thermostat controlled fan, though that would let the cold in during winter.


A home UPS should be regarded as a very brief emergency power supply backup, not a substitute for mains power so you can carry on continuing using your PC as usual.  The UPS should be used to save your open data and shutdown the PC gracefully - even small UPS models include software to detect a mains failure and then shut down a PC after a user-determined interval - say 10 minutes. You don't want the PC shut down too soon in case the mains failure is only a few minutes. The software can also regularly test the condition of the batteries.

A UPS connected to an ONT should really be seen first as a means of keeps your landline VOIP phone working during a mains power failure.


Who said anything about a UPS on a PC? I was talking about on networking equipment, maybe charging my tablet from the UPS. I also have a battery pack with a mains outlet for my photography gear, it has a rather massive battery and a spare that would keep our phones and tablets charged for quite a while, and dozens of charged NiMH AAs.

I don't have a landline either, VoIP or otherwise. I'd use cell or Skype in an emergency - maybe not the best plan, but better than nothing. With TC cable we have no internet at all in a power cut, as the repeaters run on mains power.




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  Reply # 794970 8-Apr-2013 13:23
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timmmay: A UPS connected to an ONT should really be seen first as a means of keeps your landline VOIP phone working during a mains power failure.


I'm afraid to put my ONT on a UPS: Most UPSs don't deliver a pure sine wave and I suspect that could shorten the life of/damage the ONT Power Supply.

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  Reply # 794996 8-Apr-2013 13:43
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A quick google (yes I'm an expert now) suggests switched mode power supplies don't need a pure sine wave. Plus if it fails, get a replacement, statistics suggest it's unlikely to fail during an emergency unless Murphy visits...




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  Reply # 794998 8-Apr-2013 13:45
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THe ONT have a simple 110->240V AV 0.7A to 12V DC 1A Convertor

The Plug into the ONT I have not seem before but it just uses 2 Pins for Power but I've not looked what the plug is called.


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