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  Reply # 792619 3-Apr-2013 19:16
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Hi, yes thats the old trurip and its not nice to DSL, but it appears to extend right out to the eave and on to the pole and the attendant termination there. You really need that all replaced.

Cyril



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  Reply # 792975 4-Apr-2013 10:17
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Is this something Chorus will do for free if i get on to my ISP? Slingshot are not convinced that there is a problem, how do i get them on board?

cheers

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  Reply # 792979 4-Apr-2013 10:24
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Normally, no, but if you can convince them they might just do it. As its part of the network (ie on the otherside of the demarc which in your case is the end of the trurip cable) then on Chorus can touch it.

Cyril



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  Reply # 793007 4-Apr-2013 10:56
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Hmm. Manufacture some faults?

I suppose the main question is: will replacing the 30m of overhead line with a proper conductor significantly improve sync speed (ie by 50%+)? Is my attenuation of 25db just a red herring due to some other factor?

I am still flabbergasted by the slingshot techie saying that 13Mbps was the max recorded speed at the local exchange (I had 17Mbps when living down the road, 2km from the next exchange, with a similar attenuation level).

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  Reply # 793011 4-Apr-2013 11:04
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Hi, 25dB should be good for >10Mb/s, I cannot say for sure that replacing the Trurip will fix your situation, however from past experience I think you would definitely benefit, as for you suggestion to sort it out, hmmmm those strong winds seem to have brought out a long pair of tree pruners :)

Cyril



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  Reply # 793785 5-Apr-2013 11:52
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what is the definition of this demarc rule for chorus? i have a feeling that another overworked underpaid chorus contractor is going to claim that it stops outside the house, and that i'll need a pre-prepared argument to convince him otherwise...

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  Reply # 793803 5-Apr-2013 12:19
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giollarnat: what is the definition of this demarc rule for chorus? i have a feeling that another overworked underpaid chorus contractor is going to claim that it stops outside the house, and that i'll need a pre-prepared argument to convince him otherwise...


The Demarc on a residentual connection is the ETP. If there is no ETP then it is the back of the first jackpoint where the 'incoming line terminates'.

In your case as the line has been intercepted before the first jkpt then in could be interprited that this is the place that the 'incomeing line terminates' at present.

The line to the side of your house is part of the Chorus network - but you could be charged for a replacement cable through the ceilings from the POE (Point of Entry) of the cable into the ceiling - sorry but that is normaly down the chorus tech that visits.



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