Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4
5308 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #798577 12-Apr-2013 19:25
Send private message

kyhwana2: How cheap do you want fibre for? $19.95 a month? Come on!



$19.95 a year and a free set of steak knives thrown in too. Tongue Out




Whatifthespacekeyhadneverbeeninvented?


2443 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #798584 12-Apr-2013 19:52
Send private message

DarthKermit:
kyhwana2: How cheap do you want fibre for? $19.95 a month? Come on!



$19.95 a year and a free set of steak knives thrown in too. Tongue Out


Those steak knives better never need sharpening!


OP even if you believe that Chorus is going to make extraordinary returns on UFB (they wont), surely you dont believe that the dozens of ISPs serving residential customers aren't being competitive

 
 
 
 


2213 posts

Uber Geek

Subscriber

  #798691 13-Apr-2013 09:12
Send private message

As well as the steak knives, we would also expect superb and instant help desk service, preferably based in NZ!

When this magic company arrives, don't forget to notify us so we can all rush to our stockbroker.

23 posts

Geek


  #800503 16-Apr-2013 20:56
Send private message

There's a couple of reasons UFB will be pricier:

• ISPs don't pay for GBs they pay for speed.
• National data is nearly free for ISPs. Some even provide National GBs 100% free
• The main international transit (Southern Cross Cable) has no competitor to drive down costs to the ISPs

In general because ISPs pay for speed and UFB users will be utilising that speed much easier ISPs have to charge more so they can also buy a bigger international speed pipe.

I believe there is also some regulation from the UFB rollout.


4191 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #800787 17-Apr-2013 10:51
Send private message

I can't speak for OP, but personally I pretty much won't be satisfied until Telecom and Chorus are nationalised, and run like the various "Consumer Owned" Energy Trusts (Well Energy, Electra, etc). Community orientated, with surplus funds being redirected back into the community.

As long as the incumbent former monopoly is in private shareholder hands, it will continue to gouge consumers to maximise returns for it's shareholders, and I find that morally repugnant and socially unacceptable.








2443 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #800834 17-Apr-2013 11:24
Send private message

Lias: I can't speak for OP, but personally I pretty much won't be satisfied until Telecom and Chorus are nationalised, and run like the various "Consumer Owned" Energy Trusts (Well Energy, Electra, etc). Community orientated, with surplus funds being redirected back into the community.

As long as the incumbent former monopoly is in private shareholder hands, it will continue to gouge consumers to maximise returns for it's shareholders, and I find that morally repugnant and socially unacceptable.






I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?

4446 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #800846 17-Apr-2013 11:39
Send private message

nickb800:
Lias: I can't speak for OP, but personally I pretty much won't be satisfied until Telecom and Chorus are nationalised, and run like the various "Consumer Owned" Energy Trusts (Well Energy, Electra, etc). Community orientated, with surplus funds being redirected back into the community.

As long as the incumbent former monopoly is in private shareholder hands, it will continue to gouge consumers to maximise returns for it's shareholders, and I find that morally repugnant and socially unacceptable.






I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?


It's bound to be for the Mobile network...

Of course then you need to nationalise Vodafone and 2D.

Sigh.

Cheers - N





--

 

Please note all comments are the product of my own brain and don't necessarily represent the position or opinions of my employer, previous employers, colleagues, friends or pets.


 
 
 
 


4191 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #800988 17-Apr-2013 13:56
Send private message

nickb800: 
I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?


Telecom retained ownership of the PSTN, hence including them.. If they were purely a provider I'd exclude them.






4191 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted
Lifetime subscriber

  #800989 17-Apr-2013 13:58
Send private message

Talkiet:

It's bound to be for the Mobile network...

Of course then you need to nationalise Vodafone and 2D.

Sigh.

Cheers - N



Not at all, purely for the PSTN and  2 degrees is doing a sufficiently good job of driving down pricing in mobile IMHO.






2443 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #801036 17-Apr-2013 14:46
Send private message

Lias:
nickb800: 
I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?


Telecom retained ownership of the PSTN, hence including them.. If they were purely a provider I'd exclude them.




Countdown to PSTN irrelevance in 3...2...1

VoIP is on the cusp of being mainstream, so its not worth regulating a dying technology

3608 posts

Uber Geek

Trusted

  #801069 17-Apr-2013 15:48
Send private message

robertjpayne: There's a couple of reasons UFB will be pricier:

• ISPs don't pay for GBs they pay for speed.
• National data is nearly free for ISPs. Some even provide National GBs 100% free
• The main international transit (Southern Cross Cable) has no competitor to drive down costs to the ISPs

In general because ISPs pay for speed and UFB users will be utilising that speed much easier ISPs have to charge more so they can also buy a bigger international speed pipe.

I believe there is also some regulation from the UFB rollout.



National data is definitely not free for ISPs and probably is not too much cheaper than international if transiting from some remote place or to a non peerer.

THe Southern Cross pricing is standardized with Australia where there is much competition so I reject that point also.




Speedtest 2019-10-14


29129 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #801117 17-Apr-2013 17:19
Send private message

Lias:
nickb800: 
I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?


Telecom retained ownership of the PSTN, hence including them.. If they were purely a provider I'd exclude them.




What relevence does the PSTN have? I'd argue that Chorus (or infact any other company) would have been idiots to have taken on the PSTN during the split.

29129 posts

Uber Geek

Moderator
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #801120 17-Apr-2013 17:21
Send private message

nickb800:
Lias:
nickb800: 
I can understand the principle behind nationalising Chorus, as it is a monopoly infrastructure provider, but there are dozens of companies effectively competing with Telecom, why bother with Telecom?


Telecom retained ownership of the PSTN, hence including them.. If they were purely a provider I'd exclude them.




Countdown to PSTN irrelevance in 3...2...1

VoIP is on the cusp of being mainstream, so its not worth regulating a dying technology


"Dead technology" depends on how you view it. Even a large % of VoIP <-> VoIP calls inside NZ still have to route via a NEAX.

23 posts

Geek


  #801402 18-Apr-2013 10:36
Send private message

Zeon:
robertjpayne: There's a couple of reasons UFB will be pricier:

• ISPs don't pay for GBs they pay for speed.
• National data is nearly free for ISPs. Some even provide National GBs 100% free
• The main international transit (Southern Cross Cable) has no competitor to drive down costs to the ISPs

In general because ISPs pay for speed and UFB users will be utilising that speed much easier ISPs have to charge more so they can also buy a bigger international speed pipe.

I believe there is also some regulation from the UFB rollout.



National data is definitely not free for ISPs and probably is not too much cheaper than international if transiting from some remote place or to a non peerer.

THe Southern Cross pricing is standardized with Australia where there is much competition so I reject that point also.


According to several ISP's websites like onefibre or hd national bandwidth is "practically free".

802 posts

Ultimate Geek

Trusted
Full Flavour

  #801451 18-Apr-2013 11:01
Send private message

robertjpayne: According to several ISP's websites like onefibre or hd national bandwidth is "practically free".


Can someone please point me to where I can sign up for free national bandwidth?

Even peering at APE costs $$ in fees, equipment & layer 2 backhaul charges. And doing that alone doesn't get you into every substantial network (hello Telecom) in NZ.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic




News »

Pre-orders for Huawei MateBook 13 open now
Posted 14-Aug-2020 14:26


Freeview On Demand app launches on Sony Android TVs
Posted 6-Aug-2020 13:35


UFB hits more than one million connections
Posted 6-Aug-2020 09:42


D-Link A/NZ extends COVR Wi-Fi EasyMesh System series with new three-pack
Posted 4-Aug-2020 15:01


New Zealand software Rfider tracks coffee from Colombia all the way to New Zealand businesses
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:35


Logitech G launches Pro X Wireless gaming headset
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:21


Sony Alpha 7S III provides supreme imaging performance
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:11


Sony introduces first CFexpress Type A memory card
Posted 3-Aug-2020 10:05


Marsello acquires Goody consolidating online and in-store marketing position
Posted 30-Jul-2020 16:26


Fonterra first major customer for Microsoft's New Zealand datacentre
Posted 30-Jul-2020 08:07


Everything we learnt at the IBM Cloud Forum 2020
Posted 29-Jul-2020 14:45


Dropbox launches native HelloSign workflow and data residency in Australia
Posted 29-Jul-2020 12:48


Spark launches 5G in Palmerston North
Posted 29-Jul-2020 09:50


Lenovo brings speed and smarter features to new 5G mobile gaming phone
Posted 28-Jul-2020 22:00


Withings raises $60 million to enable bridge between patients and healthcare
Posted 28-Jul-2020 21:51



Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.


Support Geekzone »

Our community of supporters help make Geekzone possible. Click the button below to join them.

Support Geezone on PressPatron



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.

Alternatively, you can receive a daily email with Geekzone updates.