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329 posts

Ultimate Geek
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Topic # 133755 1-Nov-2013 11:46
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A couple of months ago our street in New Plymouth was half dug up and half wired aerial ready for fibre, and according to www.ultrafastfibre.co.nz our address is now fibre ready (1st Nov).

But before I sign up and get the install, I wanted to get some opinions on things like where to put ETP/ITP/ONT, and how to future proof our house wiring (which we own).
As in a few years time (3+ years) we may sell and move to a bigger house.
The house is a 1950's house that was extensively redeveloped and reclad 7 years ago (previous owner), unfortunately instead of nice structured cabling, they put in cat5 cable in a daisy chain to each phone jack!

Here is the current setup diagram: (not drawn to scale, office shown much bigger)
Key:
- solid blue lines: 2x cat5e cables I installed from 2 RJ45 jacks in office, through to 2 RJ45 jacks in lounge. I installed these 2 lines, so I could connect devices in the lounge (AV stereo, PVR), and connect back to switch. Managed to pull up through office wall via old existing speaker cable (as office is on concrete pad)
- dotted green lines: daisy chain phone line, cat5. currently only used to connect adsl2 modem in office.
- all of house is on piles (access underneath) except office which is on concrete pad
- office doesn't have a 'comms' cupboard, just devices sitting on filing cabinet

house-layout

Questions:

     

  1. Should I install structured cat6 from a central point (perhaps corner of garage? or some other point)
    Would this be beneficial for future proofing the house, either for future data usage, or for future owners?
    Or is the effort not really worth it when selling a home?

  2. Where should I request the fibre ETP, ITP, and ONT be setup?
    I guess the easiest would be just trench from power pole directly to office wall, and install ETP/ITP and ONT in office?
    Or perhaps get the ETP/ITP in the corner of garage, and run 1 cat6 cable through existing conduit, under house, and to office, for the ONT?

  3. I currently don't use the daisy chained internal phone (cat5) wiring (green in diagram above), should I just leave this as is?
    Instead I use a SPA122 in office (with 2talk), connected to a panasonic cordless phone & base, and another single panasonic cordless phone in kitchen (talks to same base in office, hence no need for wiring)

Not sure if its ideal to install a comms cupboard / shelf in office, as its just a plain approx 4m x 3m room (no cupboard)? We do have a storage cupboard off the entry, but this has no power points so not ideal.
Only other thought was the corner of garage, but is it ideal to have the ONT there, along with NAS, switch, SPA122, etc? Or perhaps if it was there, could I then wire the SPA122 back into the house daisy chain phone line?

Keen on anyone's thoughts/suggestions, thanks.

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8 posts

Wannabe Geek
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  Reply # 925603 1-Nov-2013 12:28
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In my opinion just having fibre installed into your house will get you as much capital gain and if you redo the internal wiring. What I'd do is:

1. Have your ETP/ITP/ONT going straight into your office (I assume that is where the desktop is on your diagram). Your cat5 is rated up to 1gig for short distances so your existing blue cables will be fine to run it. I'd put the RGW in the office too, with a switch for all your devices (or run them wirelessly) and maybe a booster into where your existing receiver/pvr is (or you can use the switch to connect them directly via your cat5)

This solution will be fine and work well for the 6 months you need it. I wouldnt worry about rewiring if you are going to sell the house.



329 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 925613 1-Nov-2013 12:49
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Thanks, I think that would be the easiest and most simple option.

Will be at least a couple of years before we move, most likely 3+ years.

I did a bit more reading and found some other users had their ONT installed in the lounge (like behind TV), I guess this also could be an option in our house. And then use one of the existing cat5e cables in the wall going from lounge to office, and put gateway/router in office?
Not sure how to wire that back in the phone line thought, with spa122.

 
 
 
 


467 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 925658 1-Nov-2013 13:33
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Cat6 rewire is a bit of an overkill, but does future proof. Afaik cat6 is a pain to work with due to the bending radius, in most cases cat5e should work fine.

A central networking location is ideal, with patch panel for networking points in the house (can patch data or phone). You should also look at getting a UPS for the ONT/router/switch so that you can have internet/phone in case of power failure.

1958 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 925791 1-Nov-2013 15:28
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Having the phone supported by a UPS means it is a good idea to mount the necessary items together as implied by Noodle. I have just relocated my Genius to be alongside my ONT. Also means that behind the TV is likely a bad idea. All the TV needs is a cable.

266 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 926455 3-Nov-2013 08:02
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I've gone through a similar thing myself.
Had my fibre delivered just over a week ago.
Really wanted Chorus to have the easiest path possible for their ONT equipment.
So it's mounted in a nice space in the front bedroom.
After that it became my job and managed to lay just under 100m Cat6 across the house (or more precisely under it).
I am in the process of finishing up a conversion of a linen cupboard (ex hot water tank) into my IT space.
Put in a 24 port patch panel to drive the whole thing and to let me patch a specific port on the ONT into one of the ports behind the TV (should I decide I need IPTV or something).

Chose cat6 as I upgraded all of my routing, switching and WiFi gear to 1G ports a while ago, so would have been a shame not to. Paths were reasonably easy so no issues with bending.
All in all I really think I made the right decision.

Damian

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