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301 posts

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  Reply # 967821 15-Jan-2014 21:43
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Having put in alot of rbi cabinets since the peoject has started all i can say is that there have been aloy of cabinets been upgraded that shouldnt of been done - less then 50 people on them and of those 10 connected to broadband and some other major cabinets that should b upgraded arent getting done

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  Reply # 967837 15-Jan-2014 21:52
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Cbfd: Having put in alot of rbi cabinets since the peoject has started all i can say is that there have been aloy of cabinets been upgraded that shouldnt of been done - less then 50 people on them and of those 10 connected to broadband and some other major cabinets that should b upgraded arent getting done


I am sure chorus have reason why those have been upgraded etc. Most of the easy ones have been done.





 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 968217 16-Jan-2014 14:55
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  Reply # 968743 17-Jan-2014 10:45
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TBH, I think New Zealand internet is a lot better than it was in BUBA days. It's not normal to have excessive packet loss, high pings, slow download speeds etc unless living rural.

That said there seem to be a lot of people near cabinets, that are degraded partially due to strangely long cable paths, and in those instances there are more possibilities for outages etc from work "up the road" etc too.

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  Reply # 969047 17-Jan-2014 18:26
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mercutio: TBH, I think New Zealand internet is a lot better than it was in BUBA days. It's not normal to have excessive packet loss, high pings, slow download speeds etc unless living rural.

That said there seem to be a lot of people near cabinets, that are degraded partially due to strangely long cable paths, and in those instances there are more possibilities for outages etc from work "up the road" etc too.


And peoples refusal to spend a few dollars to ensure their internal wiring is up to scratch, instead spend many hours of their time looking for a free "band-aid" solution from their ISP.




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  Reply # 969050 17-Jan-2014 18:31
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michaelmurfy:
mercutio: TBH, I think New Zealand internet is a lot better than it was in BUBA days. It's not normal to have excessive packet loss, high pings, slow download speeds etc unless living rural.

That said there seem to be a lot of people near cabinets, that are degraded partially due to strangely long cable paths, and in those instances there are more possibilities for outages etc from work "up the road" etc too.


And peoples refusal to spend a few dollars to ensure their internal wiring is up to scratch, instead spend many hours of their time looking for a free "band-aid" solution from their ISP.


i'm not convinced that internal wiring is the be all and end all of problems.  sure , it's a factor to getting a stable line, or maximising sync rates.  but if you have peak time congestion or high latency, high attenuation etc it's often beyond the property.

that said, for vdsl it is more significant.  but most users would hardly even notice the difference between 12 and 15 megabit sync rate, and that's where internal wiring faults usually sit at.

what can make a bigger difference in my experience to disconnections, unstable connections etc is getting the pair changed from the property to the cabinet.  at some point it's like people realised that internal wiring can make a difference, then suddenly all problems are causing by internal wiring.

not that it's not important, but it's like having good speaker cables in your car.  it's more important to have good speakers than good cables, but when you have good speakers, to maximise the quality you want a decent amp and decent cables.  you can't change the amp (dslam) and you can't replace the cables, but usually cabels are overprovisioned 2x or more, so you can change to a different cable.

the other thing that seems to happen in nz a lot is it seems people think the quality of the DSL connection itself will change depending on the provider.  most connections come from cabinets these days and are not unbundled, and even if it is unbundlded the copper is the same.  it's like getting different qualtiy of power or fewer power outages depending on what power company you use.  the "choice" is an iillusion for the most part - billing, and so forth might change, but both internet and electricity are better than countries like india, but still not fully redundant, and "good enough" for the most part. 

the other thing is i noticed someone having slow internet on the same lan, ... it seems, there's a huge difference that a ssd makes in how fast browsing goes.  i was surprised tbh, because i thought with sufficent ram images would cache etc, and there wouldn't be much difference.  but most web sites use the same images again and again, and windows disk cache isn't amazing, and there can be a significant real world difference in browsing performance just from having a ssd.  even with < 10 megabit adsl.

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  Reply # 969095 17-Jan-2014 20:46
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sbiddle:
bakewells5856: As a rural user I do feel quite ripped off. we pay more for a fraction of the speeds anyone else in NZ would get


Rural users should pay more for broadband. If they did it could be used to justify the upgrade of equipment that can't be justified otherwise because it's providing a loss making service.




Rolling out your argument, rural users should pay higher road taxes, electricity, phone, cellular and so on.   

Fortunately, thats not how we work here in NZ. 

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  Reply # 969104 17-Jan-2014 21:04
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surfisup1000:
sbiddle:
bakewells5856: As a rural user I do feel quite ripped off. we pay more for a fraction of the speeds anyone else in NZ would get


Rural users should pay more for broadband. If they did it could be used to justify the upgrade of equipment that can't be justified otherwise because it's providing a loss making service.




Rolling out your argument, rural users should pay higher road taxes, electricity, phone, cellular and so on.   

Fortunately, thats not how we work here in NZ. 


Not the way it works?

Rural users already pay more for lots of things - petrol and groceries are two big examples.

To some extent some "rural" users are also paying more for electricity than urban users, as the fixed daily line charges from their local lines company can be higher than those charged by some lines company providing services solely in urban areas.



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  Reply # 969222 18-Jan-2014 07:19
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sbiddle:
surfisup1000:
sbiddle:
bakewells5856: As a rural user I do feel quite ripped off. we pay more for a fraction of the speeds anyone else in NZ would get


Rural users should pay more for broadband. If they did it could be used to justify the upgrade of equipment that can't be justified otherwise because it's providing a loss making service.




Rolling out your argument, rural users should pay higher road taxes, electricity, phone, cellular and so on.   

Fortunately, thats not how we work here in NZ. 


Not the way it works?

Rural users already pay more for lots of things - petrol and groceries are two big examples.

To some extent some "rural" users are also paying more for electricity than urban users, as the fixed daily line charges from their local lines company can be higher than those charged by some lines company providing services solely in urban areas.




But in return they don't have traffic congestion, don't have far to go to work, quite life style.  Everyone seems to know everyone, low crime rates..  So there's a price to pay for this life style..




Regards,

Old3eyes


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  Reply # 969248 18-Jan-2014 09:22
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mercutio:
michaelmurfy:
mercutio: TBH, I think New Zealand internet is a lot better than it was in BUBA days. It's not normal to have excessive packet loss, high pings, slow download speeds etc unless living rural.

That said there seem to be a lot of people near cabinets, that are degraded partially due to strangely long cable paths, and in those instances there are more possibilities for outages etc from work "up the road" etc too.


And peoples refusal to spend a few dollars to ensure their internal wiring is up to scratch, instead spend many hours of their time looking for a free "band-aid" solution from their ISP.


i'm not convinced that internal wiring is the be all and end all of problems.  sure , it's a factor to getting a stable line, or maximising sync rates.  but if you have peak time congestion or high latency, high attenuation etc it's often beyond the property.

that said, for vdsl it is more significant.  but most users would hardly even notice the difference between 12 and 15 megabit sync rate, and that's where internal wiring faults usually sit at.

what can make a bigger difference in my experience to disconnections, unstable connections etc is getting the pair changed from the property to the cabinet.  at some point it's like people realised that internal wiring can make a difference, then suddenly all problems are causing by internal wiring.

not that it's not important, but it's like having good speaker cables in your car.  it's more important to have good speakers than good cables, but when you have good speakers, to maximise the quality you want a decent amp and decent cables.  you can't change the amp (dslam) and you can't replace the cables, but usually cabels are overprovisioned 2x or more, so you can change to a different cable.

the other thing that seems to happen in nz a lot is it seems people think the quality of the DSL connection itself will change depending on the provider.  most connections come from cabinets these days and are not unbundled, and even if it is unbundlded the copper is the same.  it's like getting different qualtiy of power or fewer power outages depending on what power company you use.  the "choice" is an iillusion for the most part - billing, and so forth might change, but both internet and electricity are better than countries like india, but still not fully redundant, and "good enough" for the most part. 

the other thing is i noticed someone having slow internet on the same lan, ... it seems, there's a huge difference that a ssd makes in how fast browsing goes.  i was surprised tbh, because i thought with sufficent ram images would cache etc, and there wouldn't be much difference.  but most web sites use the same images again and again, and windows disk cache isn't amazing, and there can be a significant real world difference in browsing performance just from having a ssd.  even with < 10 megabit adsl.


+1 to this.

My DS Attenuation is 17.5 (According to my router just now), SNR is 14.1. I get 12.6 Down and 1.0 Mbps up (Telecom speedtest, I'm with Telecom).

I live 700m as the crow flies from our exchange (not cabinet, I can see the exchange from my deck), but I cannot get VDSL as the cable from the exchange seems to go to Timbuktu and back (Chorus have said it is not possible on my line stats to get it). I have had them out for line noise (I can hear it on the phone) and they have checked everything in the house. I asked them if I should install a master splitter, but they have said that the noise is at the pole, so would make no difference to my ability to get VDSL.
If Chorus said that my internal wiring was the problem, I'd rip it all out and redo it (I can get under the house easily). The house is only 10 years old.

Ah well, bring on the UFB goodness! (Due 2015 hopefully)


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