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  Reply # 1143773 29-Sep-2014 19:56
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This is on my 100/20 connection at home.



I get the best latency to Palo Alto / San Jose speedtest servers as our US upstream peers at layer3 in that area.

Los Angeles is obviously further down the coast.

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  Reply # 1143786 29-Sep-2014 20:18
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NonprayingMantis:
sorceror: here are some real world results (done just now from my UFB connection):



this made 16 TCP connections to reach that speed - clearly latency isn't an insurmountable issue anymore for speedtest.net


assume you are on a 200Mbps plan?


based on TimA's chart above,  16 TCP connections seems too low to get that result.
Ping of 172ms gives less than 5Mbps per connection (based on that chart),  so 16 connections would, presumably, max out at less than 80Mbps, no?

(also, how do you know how many connections the speedtest.net test has done, I can't see it anywhere on speedtest.net? - the speedtest website claims to use up to 4 HTTP threads https://support.speedtest.net/entries/20862782-How-does-the-test-itself-work-How-is-the-result-calculated-  although that 'article' is a couple of years old so maybe they use more now IDK


yep on a 200M plan. TimA's chart is outdated as I'm guessing it's based on some very conservative TCP window sizes.

the way I saw the connections was a simple 'netstat' near the end of the download test. all 16 were in the ESTABLISHED state - guessing their website refers to an earlier version of the speedtest software.

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 1143793 29-Sep-2014 20:23
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myfullflavour: This is on my 100/20 connection at home.



I get the best latency to Palo Alto / San Jose speedtest servers as our US upstream peers at layer3 in that area.

Los Angeles is obviously further down the coast.


i get better latency than that to Palo Alto (in the mid 120s) but I can't get over 20M to either of the speedtest servers there - just goes to show (again) that latency is not very useful when it comes to estimating your max throughput from speedtest.net

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  Reply # 1143807 29-Sep-2014 20:44
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sorceror: i get better latency than that to Palo Alto (in the mid 120s) but I can't get over 20M to either of the speedtest servers there - just goes to show (again) that latency is not very useful when it comes to estimating your max throughput from speedtest.net


Maybe it's an issue with your ISP that's killing your Palo Alto tests. I agree with someone's earlier comment that the US is stuffed for testing the further from the west coast you go.

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  Reply # 1143814 29-Sep-2014 20:53
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Some of the US speedtest servers tend to have terrible connectivity into them. I've got a Mikrotik VPS in Seattle that has great connectivity - I can get well over 100Mbps each way doing TCP Mikrotik bandwidth tests and then find speedtest.net servers that struggle to get 20Mbps..



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  Reply # 1143854 29-Sep-2014 21:53
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i put next to no weight on speedtests at this point.

how are you to know what sort of configuration your testing against?



a tpc stack can be tweaked to scale up far more effectively.. whats to say there is equal stacks on every server?


i personally rank isps on what they can preform over a single thread to my servers in NL (given time to window scale and such), Ill be interested in how well it scales when i can get my hands on a larger connection.. 60mbit vdsl maxes perfectly fine, with calculations inferring it should scale up far more still.




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