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  Reply # 1143566 29-Sep-2014 14:21

ReckITT: I think i can do it? well it sounds like i can...haha. 


What's the difference between 'Naked' and 'Clothed' plans? 'Clothed' plans assume that you have an existing POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) line rental at your house, from a Telco provider such as Spark, Telstraclear etc... These clothed plans are our broadband service running over your existing phone line. They're cheaper because your line provider is already paying the line rental fees to Chorus. Naked plans are for people who aren't paying a provider for an existing POTS line at their home, in which case we have to pay Chorus for the copper line rental to get your broadband connected (hence the extra cost).


This is only if there is not already an xDSL service running down that existing line. It is not possible to have two different xDSL connections with different providers on a single line.

 

The service you're referring to in SA (Which sounds like a really odd way to sell a service) appears more like two separate logins/bandwidth pools/PPPoE sessions for a single provisioned xDSL connection rather than two physically separate connections. Exactly how this is done would depend on how the wholesale market works there. I would be interested to see how it is pitched to consumers on SA ISPs' sites if you have any examples of this.

You would not be paying twice for the same thing here, as two separate xDSL connections = two separate wholesale charges plus connection charges, plus no sharing of line speed, and different ISPs can offer different routing and value-adds (e.g. bundle discounts, support, freebies, et cetera).




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https://pbtech.co.nz/smartphones




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  Reply # 1143572 29-Sep-2014 14:36
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"There is no way for 1 copper pair to connect to two different companies for Internet'' 

Yes telkom provided the line speed of your choice. But 2 different people could use from 2 different ISP companies of speed and data up to the telkom line speed installed, running on the same copper line. Hence why the speed would split half if both PC's were using at the same time. which is'nt a problem.

So eg. If i had a telkom line speed of 10mb (does not include data, only line speed), i could have 1 ISP sell me a 10mb unlimited data (mweb) and have another ISP sell me a 4mb uncapped data(axxess) and run them both same time from 2 PC's in the house. Prices of data would determin how much and how fast you want. But i could have a 1mb data speed on a 10mb ADSL line if i wanted. i would only be able to use the 1mb speed of it, but thats how it would work because the ISP would limit the data speed. 





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  Reply # 1143573 29-Sep-2014 14:40
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http://www.mweb.co.za/internet-connection/adsl/view-all-adsl-packages.aspx#uncapped-adsl



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  Reply # 1143574 29-Sep-2014 14:42
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NikT:
ReckITT: I think i can do it? well it sounds like i can...haha. 


What's the difference between 'Naked' and 'Clothed' plans? 'Clothed' plans assume that you have an existing POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) line rental at your house, from a Telco provider such as Spark, Telstraclear etc... These clothed plans are our broadband service running over your existing phone line. They're cheaper because your line provider is already paying the line rental fees to Chorus. Naked plans are for people who aren't paying a provider for an existing POTS line at their home, in which case we have to pay Chorus for the copper line rental to get your broadband connected (hence the extra cost).


This is only if there is not already an xDSL service running down that existing line. It is not possible to have two different xDSL connections with different providers on a single line. The service you're referring to in SA (Which sounds like a really odd way to sell a service) appears more like two separate logins/bandwidth pools/PPPoE sessions for a single provisioned xDSL connection rather than two physically separate connections. Exactly how this is done would depend on how the wholesale market works there. I would be interested to see how it is pitched to consumers on SA ISPs' sites if you have any examples of this.

You would not be paying twice for the same thing here, as two separate xDSL connections = two separate wholesale charges plus connection charges, plus no sharing of line speed, and different ISPs can offer different routing and value-adds (e.g. bundle discounts, support, freebies, et cetera).


Yes you can have 2 separate logins on the same DSL line.

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  Reply # 1143584 29-Sep-2014 15:01
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I see good ol' Telkom are still reinventing the wheel. :) It certainly is an interesting, expensive and supremely messy way to sell broadband. I don't think anybody in New Zealand is able to offer you a comparable solution though.




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  Reply # 1143586 29-Sep-2014 15:03
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ReckITT:
NikT:
ReckITT: I think i can do it? well it sounds like i can...haha. 


What's the difference between 'Naked' and 'Clothed' plans? 'Clothed' plans assume that you have an existing POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) line rental at your house, from a Telco provider such as Spark, Telstraclear etc... These clothed plans are our broadband service running over your existing phone line. They're cheaper because your line provider is already paying the line rental fees to Chorus. Naked plans are for people who aren't paying a provider for an existing POTS line at their home, in which case we have to pay Chorus for the copper line rental to get your broadband connected (hence the extra cost).


This is only if there is not already an xDSL service running down that existing line. It is not possible to have two different xDSL connections with different providers on a single line. The service you're referring to in SA (Which sounds like a really odd way to sell a service) appears more like two separate logins/bandwidth pools/PPPoE sessions for a single provisioned xDSL connection rather than two physically separate connections. Exactly how this is done would depend on how the wholesale market works there. I would be interested to see how it is pitched to consumers on SA ISPs' sites if you have any examples of this.

You would not be paying twice for the same thing here, as two separate xDSL connections = two separate wholesale charges plus connection charges, plus no sharing of line speed, and different ISPs can offer different routing and value-adds (e.g. bundle discounts, support, freebies, et cetera).


Yes you can have 2 separate logins on the same DSL line.


Yes and No.

There are some ISPs out there that allow multiple PPPoE/PPPoA connections over the same physical connection. Most don't however, and if you're using an ISP that's using port based auth or DHCP you're not going to be able to.

You can't have 2 different connections with 2 different ISPs over the same DSL connection as it's physically impossible under EUBA.


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  Reply # 1143592 29-Sep-2014 15:34
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quite an odd setup in SA you had... 

the concept of buying a connection, and then the isp simply being the login ontop of that is interesting.. in most cases, ild personally prefer how it is done here - no sharing what could be a rather slow line in the first place.

Ild check out if there is possibly 2 pairs running to the house, if this is the case and there are free pairs on the street and such, it will be a simple case of running a cable off the second pair at the ETP to a jackpoint for your connection.




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  Reply # 1143603 29-Sep-2014 15:53
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This now actually sounds just like a Conklin cabinet here :)

20 different people sharing the 2mb data pipe = sad faced clients

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  Reply # 1143606 29-Sep-2014 15:58
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Wont this type of setup become possible once fibre ONT's aren't locked to a single provider?

It sounds very useful for flatting environments.




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  Reply # 1143607 29-Sep-2014 15:58
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It's not quite what the OP is trying to do, but at a previous flat in my student days we had two ISP's running to our flat - A cable connection via. TelstraClear (now Vodafone) primarily for web browsing, and an ADSL connection w/ Slingshot. Also provided a bit of redundancy in case one of the networks went down, and not too bad cost-wise if you had a few people to share the cost. I'd imagine this wouldn't be too bad an option if you got a package bundle deal with Vodafone for SkyTV but otherwise as others have posted, it is not typically possible to have two DSL connections on a single line..

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  Reply # 1143610 29-Sep-2014 16:01
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Amosnz: Wont this type of setup become possible once fibre ONT's aren't locked to a single provider?

It sounds very useful for flatting environments.

But why would you bother now 'unlimited' has finally reached nz?

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  Reply # 1143612 29-Sep-2014 16:02
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PhantomNVD: This now actually sounds just like a Conklin cabinet here :)

20 different people sharing the 2mb data pipe = sad faced clients



On a slightly smalelr scale, but indeed... much my thought...


Amosnz: Wont this type of setup become possible once fibre ONT's aren't locked to a single provider?

It sounds very useful for flatting environments.


I didnt realise the ONTs were still locked down.. what a pain that would be if you wanted to say, get a Vodafone service for TV (and probably a backup connection), and another service for internet.

PhantomNVD:
Amosnz: Wont this type of setup become possible once fibre ONT's aren't locked to a single provider?

It sounds very useful for flatting environments.

But why would you bother now 'unlimited' has finally reached nz?

as above.


jtan: It's not quite what the OP is trying to do, but at a previous flat in my student days we had two ISP's running to our flat - A cable connection via. TelstraClear (now Vodafone) primarily for web browsing, and an ADSL connection w/ Slingshot. Also provided a bit of redundancy in case one of the networks went down, and not too bad cost-wise if you had a few people to share the cost. I'd imagine this wouldn't be too bad an option if you got a package bundle deal with Vodafone for SkyTV but otherwise as others have posted, it is not typically possible to have two DSL connections on a single line..


That essentially is two separate connections, which is what the OP is going to have to look at doing.




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  Reply # 1143614 29-Sep-2014 16:04
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In SA, you buy the 'DSL' service off telkom (well used to) and then you could get a PPPoE login from the provider you want, if you ran out of data you could just change the username and connect to another login.
Think of the service similar to the old jetstream service telecom sold is probably the best way to look at it, then again its been 12 years since I've lived here but have read up every now and then.

Because the chorus service these days there are a SVID built from the DSLAM back to the provider handover port and then a CVID within, you cannot share the service with multiple providers the way you are wanting to.
You can however (well we do it for businesses) have multiple PPPoE sessions where each user has their data allocation and share the same physical connection. This is not standard configuration though and I havent seen other providers doing it.




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  Reply # 1143617 29-Sep-2014 16:11
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PhantomNVD:
Amosnz: Wont this type of setup become possible once fibre ONT's aren't locked to a single provider?

It sounds very useful for flatting environments.

But why would you bother now 'unlimited' has finally reached nz?


I have a friend who owns a house and works for The-company-formerly-known-as-GenI and he gets a rebate on his Spark bill so naturally phone and net are with them.  Flatmate 1 is a gamer and would rather be with ISP XX as their routing is better.  Unlimited plans make no difference.

Also as IPTV options become more available, it could be useful to have these separated at the ONT so your TV bandwidth is seperate to general internet and can change TV provider without affecting internet (this one is theoretical).




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