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  Reply # 1246498 25-Feb-2015 16:03
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portunus: Considering the copper network was built up over the past 100 years, 10 years to get UFB to 75% of NZ houses is pretty good IMHO.



Not when you consider demand and resources available. I am not saying I have an issue with the time it's taking, but I do think 10 years vs 100 years isn't a fair comparison.

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  Reply # 1246502 25-Feb-2015 16:07
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NonprayingMantis:
jords12: As usual, the best anyone can say for the internet here is 'be glad it's not worse' :P I'd remind people that it's two thousand and fifteen. 


Not really.  several of us have commented that your anedotal experience of the USA is not representative of the truth.

Some parts of the USA can get 200Mbps broadband.  Some parts of NZ (about 40%) can get 200Mbps broadband.

Some parts of NZ can sadly only get ADSL 8Mbps or worse.  Some parts of the USA (yes, including some areas of major cities) can only get those sorts of speeds too.


This and america is more then 36X the land mass of New Zealand. Chorus has an easier job building the UFB network then US ISPs when it comes to network upgrades.

EDIT

Thanks for the correct information.





You can also follow me on twitter here @kiwifortw I do twitch streams every now and then at twitch.tv/kiwiforthewin :)

HTTP 404 Sarcasm not found.

 
 
 
 




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  Reply # 1246520 25-Feb-2015 16:16
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kiwikiwi:

This and america is more then 5X the land mass of New Zealand. Chorus has an easier job building the UFB network then US ISPs when it comes to network upgrades.


Actually it's 36X but who's counting :)

It'd just be nice if Chorus would prioritize the areas which missed cabinets and are a long way from the exchange - I'd be much less annoyed if I had VDSL, the difference in practical usage between 40/10 and 200/200 is much less than from 8/0.5, especially if you ever have to upload anything. 

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  Reply # 1246522 25-Feb-2015 16:16
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kiwikiwi:
NonprayingMantis:
jords12: As usual, the best anyone can say for the internet here is 'be glad it's not worse' :P I'd remind people that it's two thousand and fifteen. 


Not really.  several of us have commented that your anedotal experience of the USA is not representative of the truth.

Some parts of the USA can get 200Mbps broadband.  Some parts of NZ (about 40%) can get 200Mbps broadband.

Some parts of NZ can sadly only get ADSL 8Mbps or worse.  Some parts of the USA (yes, including some areas of major cities) can only get those sorts of speeds too.


This and america is more then 5X the land mass of New Zealand. Chorus has an easier job building the UFB network then US ISPs when it comes to network upgrades.


Actually because of population density and the terrain in rural NZ, I'd suggest it would be relatively as hard in NZ.

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  Reply # 1246526 25-Feb-2015 16:20
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jords12:

Actually it's 36X but who's counting :)

It'd just be nice if Chorus would prioritize the areas which missed cabinets and are a long way from the exchange - I'd be much less annoyed if I had VDSL, the difference in practical usage between 40/10 and 200/200 is much less than from 8/0.5, especially if you ever have to upload anything. 

You're right fixed my post with correct information.



networkn:
kiwikiwi:
NonprayingMantis:
jords12: As usual, the best anyone can say for the internet here is 'be glad it's not worse' :P I'd remind people that it's two thousand and fifteen. 


Not really.  several of us have commented that your anedotal experience of the USA is not representative of the truth.

Some parts of the USA can get 200Mbps broadband.  Some parts of NZ (about 40%) can get 200Mbps broadband.

Some parts of NZ can sadly only get ADSL 8Mbps or worse.  Some parts of the USA (yes, including some areas of major cities) can only get those sorts of speeds too.


This and america is more then 5X the land mass of New Zealand. Chorus has an easier job building the UFB network then US ISPs when it comes to network upgrades.


Actually because of population density and the terrain in rural NZ, I'd suggest it would be relatively as hard in NZ.


Some what almost true. AFAIK there are company contractors that do the dirty work for Comcast/TWC/Verizon. So not everyone gets access to the same copper line.
Where as when it comes to NZ, pretty much most ISPs get access to Chorus' gear, sure there are some ISPs that have their own gear.





You can also follow me on twitter here @kiwifortw I do twitch streams every now and then at twitch.tv/kiwiforthewin :)

HTTP 404 Sarcasm not found.

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  Reply # 1246527 25-Feb-2015 16:22
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Regs: 

what makes this extremely painful, is that they just, PUT FIBER IN MY STREET AND STOPPED ROLLOUT ONE BLOCK, 200M AWAY!!! $*^$&^&@^&@!!!!!!!



We're in a similar situation. UFB scheduled for 2019. Ajoining street gets UFB next month. We're on a peninsula, so not sure of the reasoning behind the disparity. But it is what it is. :-)

I can get access to VDSL, but for now we're on ADSL2 with similar specs to the OP. Works well enough for us (including my daily telecommuting to San Francisco :-)).

Our biggest bugbear has been our wifi connection to the lounge, where the PS3 & PS4 are stuck using 2.4Ghz, and Lightbox struggles as a result. Conversely the Apple TV happily chugs along on our 5Ghz network.

I do have a promising looking fix incoming though. I ordered some TP-Link Powerline adapters, and initial testing showed a 1042% increase in speed to the PS4. I then bricked them with a firmware upgrade, but have replacements on the way to me. I'll resist the urge to tinker with these new ones unless I absolutely have to. But I suspect I will have to, as the firmware upgrade fixed an issue affecting streaming video, which I suspect will be 99% of the Powerline traffic.



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  Reply # 1246528 25-Feb-2015 16:25
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networkn:

Actually because of population density and the terrain in rural NZ, I'd suggest it would be relatively as hard in NZ.


The major difference, at least when it comes to populated areas, is that they are fortunate to have had Cable TV take off in a big way, meaning that lots of people have a good quality coaxial cable going to their house - which as it turns out, can be used to deliver pretty damn fast internet (much better than phone lines), with some caveats. Upgrading to fiber optic is nice, but not a urgent issue when you can do Gigabit over DOCSIS 3.1.

Population Density is a red herring - we're not talking about the wops here, the density is pretty similar in cities (and in low density areas it makes far more sense to use wireless technologies anyway, as you have plenty of spectrum).



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  Reply # 1246531 25-Feb-2015 16:29
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dclegg:
We're in a similar situation. UFB scheduled for 2019. Ajoining street gets UFB next month. We're on a peninsula, so not sure of the reasoning behind the disparity. But it is what it is. :-)

I can get access to VDSL, but for now we're on ADSL2 with similar specs to the OP. Works well enough for us (including my daily telecommuting to San Francisco :-)).

Our biggest bugbear has been our wifi connection to the lounge, where the PS3 & PS4 are stuck using 2.4Ghz, and Lightbox struggles as a result. Conversely the Apple TV happily chugs along on our 5Ghz network.

I do have a promising looking fix incoming though. I ordered some TP-Link Powerline adapters, and initial testing showed a 1042% increase in speed to the PS4. I then bricked them with a firmware upgrade, but have replacements on the way to me. I'll resist the urge to tinker with these new ones unless I absolutely have to. But I suspect I will have to, as the firmware upgrade fixed an issue affecting streaming video, which I suspect will be 99% of the Powerline traffic.


Powerline is a decent solution, but if it doesn't work out due to wiring etc, look into getting a 5ghz wireless AC bridge (and a suitable router). With a Asus AC-66U and a Buffalo bridge to receive the wireless signal and provide a wired ethernet network to the PS3 and TV, I was getting around 400mbit (in a place with extremely crowded wifi spectrum).

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  Reply # 1246571 25-Feb-2015 17:38
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jords12:
It'd just be nice if Chorus would prioritize the areas which missed cabinets and are a long way from the exchange - I'd be much less annoyed if I had VDSL, the difference in practical usage between 40/10 and 200/200 is much less than from 8/0.5, especially if you ever have to upload anything. 


Chorus can't prioritise areas - it's the role of CFH who are funding the UFB rollout to set the rollout schedule.. And as pointed out continually the focus of the UFB rollout up until this year as NOT been residential, it's been business and priority users.




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  Reply # 1246642 25-Feb-2015 19:21
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Have you checked to see if business fibre is available? 




Chorus has spent $1.4 billion on making their xDSL broadband network faster. If your still stuck on ADSL or VDSL, why not spend from $150 on a master filter install to make sure you are getting the most out of your connection?
I install - Naked DSL, DSL Master Splitters, VoIP, data cabling and general computer support for home and small business.
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Need help in Auckland, Waikato or BoP? Click my email button, or email me direct: [my user name] at geekzonemail dot com


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  Reply # 1246645 25-Feb-2015 19:31
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there is vector business fibre down calton gore road

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  Reply # 1246708 25-Feb-2015 21:50
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mercutio: personally i think this ufb thing is a waste of government money, and that it would have made more sense to roll it out even slower but double up the vdsl cabinets.  that said if ufb was available to me i'd be tempted to get it, and what australia is doing does sound worse.

Fibre is much, much better than copper - and fibre can handle much faster speeds than VDSL.
I have a mate in Browns Bay who would love fibre but he's stuck on ADSL2 as well. No VDSL for him. No point upgrading the exchange to VDSL when he can get fibre later this year, basically leapfrog VDSL and move straight onto fibre. The minute it becomes available, he's going to get it. Can't say I blame him either.

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  Reply # 1247813 27-Feb-2015 13:52
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mercutio: newmarket is one of those special places where it sits neatly between two exchanges.  on top of that they seem to have done partial cabinet rollout, without covering many people at all.  for some reason the cabinet sides for vdsl at least look at me like they're a lot smaller than on average.  and if you're not in one of those lucky locations you're screwed.


God yes... I'm in an apartment building in Newmarket that was built after cabinetisation. We have approximately 500+ units in our building, which all runs to the exchange in Remuera 3km away. To make the loop worse, all these cable runs for 500+ units down Remuera Road, halfway down Broadway, and then comes back up Broadway and then into the apartment building.

I don't get why they couldn't cabinetise the whole apartment building when it was built, surely would have been cheaper than running 500 lines of copper all the way to Remuera.

And, trick for newbies, Chorus map says VDSL is avaliable at my address. All that means is VDSL is avaliable at the cabinet/exchange and doesn't take into account at all if you live 3km away from it. Moved into my apartment for the main reason being that VDSL would have been feasible, and I expected that there would have been a cabinet close by if the map said it was avaliable. Anyway, to be fair they are installing UFB in our apartment now, so hopefully won't be too long until I can get it installed. I get 5mbit ADSL at it's best, but during peak it is currently unusable.



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  Reply # 1248082 27-Feb-2015 20:53
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The map is an estimate, not a promise of service.

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  Reply # 1248085 27-Feb-2015 21:03
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quickymart: The map is an estimate, not a promise of service.


But, if I am 3km from the exchange how is it a valid estimate. Still also makes no financial sense why my building was not cabinetised when it was built.

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