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4 posts

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# 177473 3-Aug-2015 17:10
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Im new here, so sorry if i make mistakes

Basically, my current internet contract is expiring soon and my area is viable for a ufb connection.
Bigpipe is not an option for me currently, as we need landline.
unlimited or 80gb with landline. I will probably be using isp supplied modems as well.
Also, Spark has offered me 200$ of welcome credit.
I've heard snap/2degrees is really good, but is the difference in service/modem quality worth 200$?

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  # 1361309 8-Aug-2015 22:06

Spark use a transparent proxy. 2d don't. Would a proxy cause problems for you? Also 2d have IPV6





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  # 1361310 8-Aug-2015 22:14
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Spark dumped their transparent proxy/cache earlier in the year.


 
 
 
 


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  # 1361313 8-Aug-2015 22:28
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Both are very good ISP's and both offer very good service. I am personally with "2degrees Broadband" (was a Snap customer) and find it really good for my needs however I just have Naked UFB. Speed, service stability etc is very good.

Before that I was a Spark customer - I would still be with Spark however at the time when we bought our new house Spark didn't offer 200mbit connections so signed up with Snaps 200/200 service instead.

If you do use the landline I would recommend looking at Sparks offerings as they bring their voice service straight to the ONT which is connected to your existing home phone wiring - this leaves you free to use any router you desire. With 2degrees you'll have to use their Fritz!Box router for phone service which is fine but you're stuck with it.

Ultimately it comes down to personal preference. For you - I think Spark would be the better ISP however if you're eyeing up 2degrees 200/200 plan (trust me, it is actually rather overkill for most people) then go for it. Both don't have transparent proxies and both have really good bandwidth contention, support and pricing.




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  # 1361435 9-Aug-2015 10:39

Glad to hear that Spark have gotten rid of their proxy's. Guessing it is only Vodafone who still have them?





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  # 1361497 9-Aug-2015 13:16
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Maungruu: Im new here, so sorry if i make mistakes

Basically, my current internet contract is expiring soon and my area is viable for a ufb connection.
Bigpipe is not an option for me currently, as we need landline.
unlimited or 80gb with landline. I will probably be using isp supplied modems as well.
Also, Spark has offered me 200$ of welcome credit.
I've heard snap/2degrees is really good, but is the difference in service/modem quality worth 200$?


Just to clarify your point around a landline...as far as I am aware, neither Spark or 2degrees will give you a true landline...they both deliver their landline service as VOIP over the fibre connection - Spark use a port on the ONT, while 2degrees use a port on their Fritzbox. Either of these can be connected to your existing house wiring to use existing phones, but both of them might cause problems with older devices that expect a 'real' phone line.

So if your reason for a landline is simply to have a local number and use your existing jack points then either ISP will be fine, but if it is to support an older device (e.g. medical alert or house alarm system) then both providers have the potential to cause problems.

Chris



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Wannabe Geek


  # 1361649 9-Aug-2015 17:48
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So if your reason for a landline is simply to have a local number and use your existing jack points then either ISP will be fine, but if it is to support an older device (e.g. medical alert or house alarm system) then both providers have the potential to cause problems.

Chris


The landline would be just for phones.



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Wannabe Geek


  # 1361650 9-Aug-2015 17:52
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Does the fritzbox have any significant differences(speed/wireless strength/able to withstand multiple users) over the huawei whatever that spark provides? I will definitely be sticking with default modem.

 
 
 
 


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  # 1361676 9-Aug-2015 19:08
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maslink: Just to clarify your point around a landline...as far as I am aware, neither Spark or 2degrees will give you a true landline...they both deliver their landline service as VOIP over the fibre connection - Spark use a port on the ONT, while 2degrees use a port on their Fritzbox. Either of these can be connected to your existing house wiring to use existing phones, but both of them might cause problems with older devices that expect a 'real' phone line.

So if your reason for a landline is simply to have a local number and use your existing jack points then either ISP will be fine, but if it is to support an older device (e.g. medical alert or house alarm system) then both providers have the potential to cause problems.

Chris


I disagree with those statements in regards to Spark's Voice over Fibre offering, and am not 100% across the 2D/Snap one so can't comment there.

An extensive list of low speed devices were tested on Spark before Voice over Fibre was launched. This included medical alarms, home alarms, sky boxes, EFT-POS terminals and a range of dialup modems. From memory there was only one early generation EFT-POS terminal and one model of Sky box that required some re-configuration to make work. There is also a known issue with Distinctive Ring aka Faxability with a few models of Fax Machines that doesn't like some of the cadence. But I believe that should be sorted out in the next few weeks.

In my view the only "real" issue with Fibre vs Copper voice services is in the event of loss of power you don't have your PSTN line anymore unless you have a UPS. But with the vast majority of people these days having walk-around phones where when the base station looses power it's dead in the water  the argument is somewhat moot.

Apart from that Voice over Fibre is as much like regular POTS PSTN services as possible.







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  # 1361710 9-Aug-2015 20:18
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Thanks, i didnt know about all this voice over fiber whatnot, but it looks like i dont have anything to worry about.

ajw

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  # 1361765 9-Aug-2015 21:36
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Maungruu: Thanks, i didnt know about all this voice over fiber whatnot, but it looks like i dont have anything to worry about.


If you decide to go with spark you can specify you want the wiring connected through your existing jackpoints. This I believe will cost you $49 and is done during the installation process.


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  # 1361770 9-Aug-2015 21:45
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BarTender:
maslink: Just to clarify your point around a landline...as far as I am aware, neither Spark or 2degrees will give you a true landline...they both deliver their landline service as VOIP over the fibre connection - Spark use a port on the ONT, while 2degrees use a port on their Fritzbox. Either of these can be connected to your existing house wiring to use existing phones, but both of them might cause problems with older devices that expect a 'real' phone line.

So if your reason for a landline is simply to have a local number and use your existing jack points then either ISP will be fine, but if it is to support an older device (e.g. medical alert or house alarm system) then both providers have the potential to cause problems.

Chris


I disagree with those statements in regards to Spark's Voice over Fibre offering, and am not 100% across the 2D/Snap one so can't comment there.

An extensive list of low speed devices were tested on Spark before Voice over Fibre was launched. This included medical alarms, home alarms, sky boxes, EFT-POS terminals and a range of dialup modems. From memory there was only one early generation EFT-POS terminal and one model of Sky box that required some re-configuration to make work. There is also a known issue with Distinctive Ring aka Faxability with a few models of Fax Machines that doesn't like some of the cadence. But I believe that should be sorted out in the next few weeks.

In my view the only "real" issue with Fibre vs Copper voice services is in the event of loss of power you don't have your PSTN line anymore unless you have a UPS. But with the vast majority of people these days having walk-around phones where when the base station looses power it's dead in the water  the argument is somewhat moot.

Apart from that Voice over Fibre is as much like regular POTS PSTN services as possible.


Very evident after the Feb quake, we did some volunteer days as we could not work immediately, giving away corded phones. Another point is that with many now on naked, many have decided to forego that anyway, and rely on mobiles. 

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  # 1361807 10-Aug-2015 01:06
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Maungruu: Does the fritzbox have any significant differences(speed/wireless strength/able to withstand multiple users) over the huawei whatever that spark provides? I will definitely be sticking with default modem.


last i knew fritzbox's wireless performance was sub-par.  i don't know if they have better ones yet.  the huawei wireless ac and single band 2.4 performance seem fine.  slightly worse than a standalone wireless router, but good enough that people not wanting to use a standalone wireless router should be fine.  i suppose it depends if you want to be able to do 200 megabit over wireless ac or not.  doing such at distance is pretty hard, and if wanting to be able to do such easily, you kind of want to be doing triple stream where most standalone cards are only double stream. (i have one of the vodafone hg659s that i got off trademe for $70; they apparently are the same as the telecom ones with different firmware; but i don't know if wireless performance is different due to firmware)

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  # 1361895 10-Aug-2015 09:51
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mercutio:
Maungruu: Does the fritzbox have any significant differences(speed/wireless strength/able to withstand multiple users) over the huawei whatever that spark provides? I will definitely be sticking with default modem.


last i knew fritzbox's wireless performance was sub-par.  i don't know if they have better ones yet.  the huawei wireless ac and single band 2.4 performance seem fine.  slightly worse than a standalone wireless router, but good enough that people not wanting to use a standalone wireless router should be fine.  i suppose it depends if you want to be able to do 200 megabit over wireless ac or not.  doing such at distance is pretty hard, and if wanting to be able to do such easily, you kind of want to be doing triple stream where most standalone cards are only double stream. (i have one of the vodafone hg659s that i got off trademe for $70; they apparently are the same as the telecom ones with different firmware; but i don't know if wireless performance is different due to firmware)


The Fritzbox they are using now (7490) is pretty good - wireless ac works well, and wifi coverage better than the Netgear I used to have. Also have DECT built in so you can pair your cordless phones direct to the modem (no wires at all). The other advantage of having voice going through the modem is that you can set it up to email you when you miss a call, or even to email you the voicemail recording. You can load your contacts into the modem so it recognises and identifies who called or left a voicemail.




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  # 1361982 10-Aug-2015 11:32
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n4:
mercutio:
Maungruu: Does the fritzbox have any significant differences(speed/wireless strength/able to withstand multiple users) over the huawei whatever that spark provides? I will definitely be sticking with default modem.


last i knew fritzbox's wireless performance was sub-par.  i don't know if they have better ones yet.  the huawei wireless ac and single band 2.4 performance seem fine.  slightly worse than a standalone wireless router, but good enough that people not wanting to use a standalone wireless router should be fine.  i suppose it depends if you want to be able to do 200 megabit over wireless ac or not.  doing such at distance is pretty hard, and if wanting to be able to do such easily, you kind of want to be doing triple stream where most standalone cards are only double stream. (i have one of the vodafone hg659s that i got off trademe for $70; they apparently are the same as the telecom ones with different firmware; but i don't know if wireless performance is different due to firmware)


The Fritzbox they are using now (7490) is pretty good - wireless ac works well, and wifi coverage better than the Netgear I used to have. Also have DECT built in so you can pair your cordless phones direct to the modem (no wires at all). The other advantage of having voice going through the modem is that you can set it up to email you when you miss a call, or even to email you the voicemail recording. You can load your contacts into the modem so it recognises and identifies who called or left a voicemail.

I'd make the suggestion that the fritz 7490 is a far superior to the Huawei units. Just one opinion though.

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  # 1362031 10-Aug-2015 12:33
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eXDee:
n4:
mercutio:
Maungruu: Does the fritzbox have any significant differences(speed/wireless strength/able to withstand multiple users) over the huawei whatever that spark provides? I will definitely be sticking with default modem.


last i knew fritzbox's wireless performance was sub-par.  i don't know if they have better ones yet.  the huawei wireless ac and single band 2.4 performance seem fine.  slightly worse than a standalone wireless router, but good enough that people not wanting to use a standalone wireless router should be fine.  i suppose it depends if you want to be able to do 200 megabit over wireless ac or not.  doing such at distance is pretty hard, and if wanting to be able to do such easily, you kind of want to be doing triple stream where most standalone cards are only double stream. (i have one of the vodafone hg659s that i got off trademe for $70; they apparently are the same as the telecom ones with different firmware; but i don't know if wireless performance is different due to firmware)


The Fritzbox they are using now (7490) is pretty good - wireless ac works well, and wifi coverage better than the Netgear I used to have. Also have DECT built in so you can pair your cordless phones direct to the modem (no wires at all). The other advantage of having voice going through the modem is that you can set it up to email you when you miss a call, or even to email you the voicemail recording. You can load your contacts into the modem so it recognises and identifies who called or left a voicemail.

I'd make the suggestion that the fritz 7490 is a far superior to the Huawei units. Just one opinion though.


I would agree, I have the 7390 myself and have spent a lot of time working with HG659's which has left a lot to be desired.

The HG659 is a good entry level device (although typically crippled by firmware) but the FritzBox is a rock solid and very stable advanced device from my own experience, Wifi on it in my experience has been perfectly adequate and the other features not typically supported by other ISP supplied hardware are very welcome.

In my view from my own experience the FritzBox by far is the best ISP supplied hardware available today.




Perpetually undecided.

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