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Topic # 192307 6-Mar-2016 03:53
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Hi,

 

Now with fibre available in my area (Dunedin), I would like to be able to have multiple ip's into my home server. Eg if I am running a dell R610 with some say 6 or so vm's, it would be really handy if some of these could be networked to different ip's. Eg I would want something like a /29 on ipv4 (6 ips) or a /122 on ipv6 (64 addresses). That way I could easily run multiple (non-critical) services from my home. Even a small business account where they are not trying to gouge the price difference would be fine...

 

Maybe this is still not easily possible but it seems a real shame given that we now have fantastically high internet speeds, 1Gbps down, 500Mbps up.  (In actual fact I wouldn't need anything even approaching these speeds.) Collocation in nz is still relatively expensive (last time I did the pricing rounds) and even though we have some servers colocated it would be handy to have some boxes to hack around on / experiment etc. (But at NZ$500 to NZ$1500 for a single U1 colocation per year) playing around is pretty expensive for a couple of boxes.

 

So is this possible / not insanely bleeding edgely difficult? If so any recommendations on who to go with?

 

(Currently our router is an HG659b if it makes any difference. Even if this costs like NZ$500 to set up it would be quite nice to do so...)

 

Thanks,

 

   Jas


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  Reply # 1506733 6-Mar-2016 07:48
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I know 2degrees (Snap) offer this, I can't remember the exact pricing though.


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  Reply # 1506734 6-Mar-2016 07:52
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The simple answer is yes, and it's something any good business provider will offer. I assume you've just been looking at cheap unlimited residential offerings so far which is why you haven't come across any offering this?

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1506747 6-Mar-2016 08:26
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PM'd you.


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  Reply # 1507772 7-Mar-2016 21:47
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HD.net





Ray Taylor
Taylor Broadband (rural hawkes bay)
www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here






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  Reply # 1507831 8-Mar-2016 00:08
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sbiddle:

 

The simple answer is yes, and it's something any good business provider will offer. I assume you've just been looking at cheap unlimited residential offerings so far which is why you haven't come across any offering this? 

 

 

Well... I had contacted some business before and things where not cheap. I mean current residential offerings are on the order of say NZ$1200 a year or around that. Getting 1000Mbitps down and 500Mbitps up it would be nice to have multiple IP's. Maybe pay an extra NZ$500 a year for the privilege?!? But being gouged with something ridiculous is something we dearly want to avoid. We are still are startup, etc... So I hadn't contacted many businesses this second time around. If you have any recommendations I'll give them a call... If you have ballpark figures it would be really nice to know them...

 

Thanks, Jas




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  Reply # 1507832 8-Mar-2016 00:33
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raytaylor:

 

HD.net

 

 

You mean hd.net.nz... Yowsa... 2U colocation for a year would be NZ$3000. Currently we are paying NZ$1000 for this with our hosting provider. HD.net.nz is not cheap at all! (Colocation in the US america is a **lot** cheaper...)

 

Their cheapest business plan is NZ$270 per month for a lot slower speed then we currently get. (It is auckland only). Also this doesn't being to answer the question of extra IP's etc. This sounds like a not so great option... (Maybe I missed something?)

 

Thanks, Jas


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  Reply # 1507833 8-Mar-2016 00:38
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Just ordered 2degrees UFB and comes with /48 IPv6 on request thinks its like $140 a month for unlimited 100/100.






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  Reply # 1507836 8-Mar-2016 00:51
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Voyager.


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  Reply # 1507838 8-Mar-2016 01:31
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Be careful - you cannot compare a residential grade service with a business grade service.

 

 





Ray Taylor
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www.ruralkiwi.com

There is no place like localhost
For my general guide to extending your wireless network Click Here




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  Reply # 1507843 8-Mar-2016 06:52
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Yeah 2degrees don't charge much for a /29, it will be pointed at your router so you'll probably get to use the network and broadcast address too (so 8 IPs or 4 IPs on a /30)

 

Alternatively if you're wanting to expose several servers on port 80/443 you could setup a reverse proxy to publish as many servers you want through one IP.


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  Reply # 1507847 8-Mar-2016 07:34
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jasnz:

 

sbiddle:

 

The simple answer is yes, and it's something any good business provider will offer. I assume you've just been looking at cheap unlimited residential offerings so far which is why you haven't come across any offering this? 

 

 

Well... I had contacted some business before and things where not cheap. I mean current residential offerings are on the order of say NZ$1200 a year or around that. Getting 1000Mbitps down and 500Mbitps up it would be nice to have multiple IP's. Maybe pay an extra NZ$500 a year for the privilege?!? But being gouged with something ridiculous is something we dearly want to avoid. We are still are startup, etc... So I hadn't contacted many businesses this second time around. If you have any recommendations I'll give them a call... If you have ballpark figures it would be really nice to know them...

 

Thanks, Jas

 

 

You need to be careful when you start talking about "gouging" - residential broadband in NZ is basically a loss leading offering with lots of providers pretty much selling a product with very little margin. Current entry level Gigatown pricing at $100 per month is unsustainable going forward, so I don't think paying 2-3x the price you mentioned at an absolutely mimimum is unrealistic considering you're expecting a business grade offering, business features and presumably want support.

 

 

 

 

 

 




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  Reply # 1508337 8-Mar-2016 17:41
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jnimmo:

 

Yeah 2degrees don't charge much for a /29, it will be pointed at your router so you'll probably get to use the network and broadcast address too (so 8 IPs or 4 IPs on a /30)

 

Alternatively if you're wanting to expose several servers on port 80/443 you could setup a reverse proxy to publish as many servers you want through one IP.

 

 

Thanks. Yes we already using nginx as a reverse proxy. The other ip's are for things like a mail server (experimental), accessing an idrac on a dell so we can remote control the software on the box, etc. (We are currently using R610's in our colocation and so want a pair of servers to play with)

 

A /29 would be sufficient. By not much I take it this is maybe less than NZ$100 to NZ$200 per year? You wouldn't have firmer prices on that would you? Thanks, Jason




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  Reply # 1508339 8-Mar-2016 17:43
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Zeon:

 

Just ordered 2degrees UFB and comes with /48 IPv6 on request thinks its like $140 a month for unlimited 100/100.

 

 

Thanks. This is the second answer for 2degrees (formally snap) I'll give them a call tomorrow and try and wind my way through support... Thanks! Jason




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  Reply # 1508350 8-Mar-2016 18:14
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sbiddle:

 

jasnz:

 

Well... I had contacted some business before and things where not cheap. I mean current residential offerings are on the order of say NZ$1200 a year or around that. Getting 1000Mbitps down and 500Mbitps up it would be nice to have multiple IP's. Maybe pay an extra NZ$500 a year for the privilege?!? But being gouged with something ridiculous is something we dearly want to avoid. We are still are startup, etc... So I hadn't contacted many businesses this second time around. If you have any recommendations I'll give them a call... If you have ballpark figures it would be really nice to know them...

 

Thanks, Jas

 

 

You need to be careful when you start talking about "gouging" - residential broadband in NZ is basically a loss leading offering with lots of providers pretty much selling a product with very little margin. Current entry level Gigatown pricing at $100 per month is unsustainable going forward, so I don't think paying 2-3x the price you mentioned at an absolutely mimimum is unrealistic considering you're expecting a business grade offering, business features and presumably want support.

 

 

As a general comment (I am sure there is lot's of discussion around this) colocation is maybe 5 times cheaper in the US than here? Maybe it is only 2-3 times cheaper? It depends a bit. But on the gross level someone somewhere is gouging in NZ. Of course it depends on monopolies etc, but eg for residential 20 Mbs down / 7 up ADSL unlimited in Spain we paid around NZ$35 per month. You just can't get such things in NZ... I really don't / didn't want this to veer off about price... If you work in the industry and you get a lot of people paying "business" rates and they are happy to do so, then great!

 

Personally, I would consider NZ$200 to NZ$300 for a connection unrealistic. Residential services are *already* very high compared to other places in the world.

 

So my question is (was), can a person / company get some extra ip's when on fibre? We don't need SLA agreements or minimum bandwidth, or bust rates, etc things. That is why we currently have a couple of boxes in colocation. (Even then for these boxes in colocation we fail over to the cloud (launch on digital ocean in around 3 minutes... so not perfect but not too bad...) Our colocation went down 3 times last year. Outages of 8 hours, and 2 hours, and 2.5 hours if I recall correctly...) So this is to run / have some non-critical services, that are there something like 98-99% of the time but are not critical. We can pound on these boxes, try installing weird things, etc. etc. Eg we are currently using proxmox 3.4 and we would like to try out proxmox 4.0 with it's LXC containers, etc. Colocating a box just for that is a bit overkill... So basically residential fibre is more than sufficient, and we just need the extra IP's or we have to jump through a lot of hoops, or do port mapping etc...

 

Actually, I am not sure if our colocation service was actually better / worse than the residential service here, since we don't stringently monitor the residential fibre. I would suspect the residential service is worse but not hugely worse... And at least with our colocation we had someone to ring and chat to... Also they have been fairly helpful. And also likely our hosters will not shut our boxes off if we did something stupid, etc... they will call us and tell us and we will scramble like mad to fix the problem...)

 

Anyway, I think this is a little bit the point of the post, ie to see if we could use a residential grade service as a non-critical experimental service? Given we have had to fail over to the cloud in any case it would be nice to know how much more often we would have to do this on a residential service. Currently in dunedin our residential service is something like 10 times faster than our colocation service? Our colocation uses a lot less traffic then eg someone that does a  low / medium amount of torrenting. (movies are big :) )


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  Reply # 1508409 8-Mar-2016 19:50
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jasnz:

 

Personally, I would consider NZ$200 to NZ$300 for a connection unrealistic. Residential services are *already* very high compared to other places in the world.

 

 

$200 to $300 is on the low end for a business connection. I'm surprised you consider that unrealistic.

 

The fact NZ residential internet is already very high is something I strongly disagree with. NZ has some of the best internet in the world at amazingly good pricing. You can't have cheap pricing and good quality - countries such as the UK and Australia are proof of that. I visit the US a few times per year and every time I'm also amazed how terrible there internet is. Yes low end copper maybe more expensive, but the same can't be said for fibre.

 

Pricing for high speed connections  such as 200Mbps are cheaper in NZ that what you'll pay in the US, and the quality of our connections is arguably a lot better.

 

As for business use the US is a horrible place - try researching what business connections cost in the US and you'll suddenly realise even Bitstream3 UFB connections here represent a true bargain.

 

At the end of the day your views clearly differ from mine - you want a business product offering but want to pay low cost residential pricing. Good luck finding a suitable provider.

 

 

 

 


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