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  Reply # 1582923 29-Jun-2016 19:32
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I can't see why you couldn't just leave a section of conduit sticking up at the base of the pole. The install guys can then add their own conduit onto it and go up the pole to the top.

 

What kind of conduit are you planning to use?


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  Reply # 1582924 29-Jun-2016 19:39
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Yeah I guess that could work. I'm planning to use orange 20mm high density conduit. And I understand I need to use sweeping bends.




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  Reply # 1582927 29-Jun-2016 19:45
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Orange is only meant to be used for electrical cables, not telecommunications. Also, orange and gray electrical conduit isn't the same diameter as telecommunications conduit (I think this is probably deliberate to stop them from being used together).

 

Bunnings sell 20 mm white pressure pipe (in six metre lengths) and sweep bends that can be used. This kind of 20 mm conduit is exactly the same diameter as the Chorus branded green conduit.




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  Reply # 1582929 29-Jun-2016 19:50
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There's a bit of information on this on the Chorus website that you might've seen?

 

https://www.chorus.co.nz/broadband-options/for-home/fibre/installing

 

https://www.chorus.co.nz/contractors/installing-underground-lead-in-pipes

 

I don't think it has instructions specifically for when the "black box" where the fibre is fed from is up a pole, but from looking at the existing (copper) underground installs on my street, it seems to be a conduit sticking up from the ground, joined to another that runs up the pole.


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  Reply # 1582948 29-Jun-2016 20:28
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Thanks guys. Excellent info. It strikes me that the conduit will likely fill water but I don't suppose it really matters.




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  Reply # 1583296 30-Jun-2016 12:49
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No it won't matter if water gets in. The ruggedised fibre is impervious to water. I wouldn't even bother solvent bonding the pipes and bends together.

 

How far is it from your pole to your house BTW?


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  Reply # 1583300 30-Jun-2016 12:54
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It's about 11-12M I think.





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  Reply # 1583305 30-Jun-2016 13:04
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So two * six metre lengths in theory should be sufficient. Until you find you're probably 100 mm short. tongue-out


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  Reply # 1583535 30-Jun-2016 19:22
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So true. Getting 6m lengths in the wagon may also be interesting. Now just a waiting game, July will be the month I ware out the Chorus webserver (and the F5 key on my keyboard!)




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  Reply # 1583796 1-Jul-2016 03:04
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For my own installation, I cobbled together enough of the green conduit from second hand building parts suppliers to span the 11 metres that I needed. Not all of the lengths I obtained had a spigot end so I used some 20 mm couplers to join the conduits together.

 

You can see the white couplers in this pic:

 

Click to see full size

 

If you can't get a full six metre length in your vehicle, you could cut them in half and use two couplers to re-join. smile


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  Reply # 1583809 1-Jul-2016 06:27
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That's great recycling. And that's a super tidy trench, how did you go about that?




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  Reply # 1583815 1-Jul-2016 06:54
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mcraenz: Thanks guys. Excellent info. It strikes me that the conduit will likely fill water but I don't suppose it really matters.

 

You could push-fit an inverted u-bend so that it's facing downward, to stop water getting in. They could remove it if necessary when they thread the fibre through. Even pass the fibre through the u-bend first, then into the conduit, feed the cable in and replace the bend last to restore the water-stop. I would prefer to not have water in there.


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  Reply # 1583937 1-Jul-2016 10:43
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mcraenz: That's great recycling. And that's a super tidy trench, how did you go about that?

 

Cheers. The trench was across the middle of our front lawn so I had no reference points to use. I used a builder's string as a guide to help me dig in a straight line. I simply used a spade and a trowel to dig my trench. I made it as narrow as possible to reduce the amount of digging. I dug it to a full depth of 500 mm, no compromises.

 

There are more photos in my DIY thread if you want to go back and have a look at that.


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  Reply # 1588560 8-Jul-2016 23:21
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Water in the duct doesnt matter at all, wont affect the fibre speed etc.

Also if you use orange ducting then theres a good chance the installer wont put it through the duct as orange is for power only.


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