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bigbadkiwi

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#196216 23-May-2016 15:46
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Hi,

 

I live in an all-fibre subdivision in Christchurch. It has Chorus infrastructure (There are a few small subdivisions in the CHCH region that have Chorus UFB infrastructure) and have been connected to their fibre network for about 2 years (since the house was built). However, today I see Enable trenching down my street and laying down their fibre network.

 

Some people in NZ can't even get fibre yet, however, I now have two separate fibre lines running past my house (one Chorus and now one Enable)

 

Why is this?


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hio77
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  #1558057 23-May-2016 16:37
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handovers between enable and chorus arent shared, some isps out there may not have the infrastructure to connect to chorus in that.

 

 

 

I do agree though, it can certainly be looked at as a bit of a waste. i can only imagine the complexity of now do we order enable or chorus fibre...





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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 


tdgeek
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  #1558068 23-May-2016 17:00
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Possibly a contract issue "This is our area" but if so, its a waste of time and money, shame on someone


 
 
 
 


yitz
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  #1558077 23-May-2016 17:08
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It could be that new stages of the subdivison are Enable UFB, older stages were ex-Telecom Wholesale BoF.

toejam316
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  #1558087 23-May-2016 17:18
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As far as I understand it, anywhere Chorus has existing Copper infrastructure is out of bounds for their own deployment of Fibre if a competitor has the Crown Fibre Holdings contract for the UFB Project, so what Chorus does instead is anywhere there is no Copper network and the outlay wouldn't be much more (or in some cases possibly less than) the cost of installing a new Copper system, they'll instead construct a Fibre system. Alternatively sometimes depending on the quoted prices, the developer will go with only Chorus or only LFC for the installation. In the case of where you live, I imagine that the Fibre installed by Chorus wasn't part of the UFB project, and was just a new subdivision that was Fibre only - tell me if my guess is wrong though.




Anything I say is the ramblings of an ill informed, opinionated so-and-so, and not representative of any of my past, present or future employers, and is also probably best disregarded.


bigbadkiwi

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  #1558116 23-May-2016 17:42
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toejam316: As far as I understand it, anywhere Chorus has existing Copper infrastructure is out of bounds for their own deployment of Fibre if a competitor has the Crown Fibre Holdings contract for the UFB Project, so what Chorus does instead is anywhere there is no Copper network and the outlay wouldn't be much more (or in some cases possibly less than) the cost of installing a new Copper system, they'll instead construct a Fibre system. Alternatively sometimes depending on the quoted prices, the developer will go with only Chorus or only LFC for the installation. In the case of where you live, I imagine that the Fibre installed by Chorus wasn't part of the UFB project, and was just a new subdivision that was Fibre only - tell me if my guess is wrong though.

 

Yeah it is an enterprise homes subdivision. My understanding is that it wasn't part of the UFB project because the subdivision broke ground before the Enable rollout got underway. Essentially we had fibre in our area before most of Christchurch. I can understand that Enable is wanting to have the whole network complete without black spots in their coverage but geez it does seem like a waste, especially with CHCH not currently swimming in money. You would think if Enable were going to lay their own Fibre infrastructure they would do the rest of Christchurch first before coming into an area that already has fibre.

 

 

 

And with the digging up of the fresh new sealed driveways, that's an issue for another day.


bigbadkiwi

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  #1558119 23-May-2016 17:48
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The weird thing is that Chorus is still laying their own fibre in the subdivision where Enable is. The reason being, as new development occurs and new roads are put down, Chorus are contracted by the developers to lay the Fibre and Enable just rocks along later after development with their own infrastructure.


InstallerUFB
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  #1558120 23-May-2016 17:50
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Yep the original Fibre build would have been done by Chorus (they paid for it rather than the current subsidised network LFC installs ) under their old BOF (Broadband over fibre) system. These have been moved over to the current UFB system but as has been commented on there are limited RSPs that have handover points connected to these converted areas. Enable being the local LFC will be able to install their subsidised network through and around the area and pick up customers on their network as they will have the majority of RSPs with handovers. In my opinion - Its not double dipping at the expense of others, as far as the UFB roll out goes, but it dose seem to be a real waste of money on duplicating networks in such a small market.


 
 
 
 


BarTender
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  #1558195 23-May-2016 20:04
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If only there was a way for all LFCs to play nicely in these situations as I would expect that there should be space in the ducts down the street and in the ABFATs.
But using someone elses ducts would require money to change hands on an ongoing basis so Enable would just trench and put in their own FATs next to the Chorus one.

Just imagine when 2020 rolls around and it becomes all an open network. Fun and games then.




and


myfullflavour
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  #1558196 23-May-2016 20:07
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I understand Chorus have done the majority of the greenfield subdivisions in Christchurch, even since Enable got the UFB contract for the area.

I'm aware of a developer in Tauranga who got a significantly lower quote from Chorus than UFF for their development, you can guess who he contracted for the development...

toejam316
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  #1558210 23-May-2016 20:25
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BarTender: If only there was a way for all LFCs to play nicely in these situations as I would expect that there should be space in the ducts down the street and in the ABFATs.
But using someone elses ducts would require money to change hands on an ongoing basis so Enable would just trench and put in their own FATs next to the Chorus one.

Just imagine when 2020 rolls around and it becomes all an open network. Fun and games then.

 

I think you're overestimating how enthusiastic all the RSPs are to install their own OLTs.




Anything I say is the ramblings of an ill informed, opinionated so-and-so, and not representative of any of my past, present or future employers, and is also probably best disregarded.


kiwifidget
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  #1558278 23-May-2016 21:53
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Pukekohe is the same. Most streets now have two fibre lines.

 

The local electricity lines company laid fibre all around the place several years ago, and even set up a local ISP (called Wired Country, which was later sold to Compass).

 

And now Chorus/OCL have been going round laying more fibre right beside it. 

 

 

 

 





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sbiddle
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  #1558358 24-May-2016 07:10
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kiwifidget:

 

Pukekohe is the same. Most streets now have two fibre lines.

 

The local electricity lines company laid fibre all around the place several years ago, and even set up a local ISP (called Wired Country, which was later sold to Compass).

 

And now Chorus/OCL have been going round laying more fibre right beside it. 

 

 

 

If my memory serves me correctly that was all a P2P network so is unsuitable for delivering GPON services.

 

 


kiwifidget
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  #1558372 24-May-2016 07:23
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sbiddle:

 

kiwifidget:

 

Pukekohe is the same. Most streets now have two fibre lines.

 

The local electricity lines company laid fibre all around the place several years ago, and even set up a local ISP (called Wired Country, which was later sold to Compass).

 

And now Chorus/OCL have been going round laying more fibre right beside it. 

 

 

 

If my memory serves me correctly that was all a P2P network so is unsuitable for delivering GPON services.

 

 

 

 

I dont know what GPON is, but as a resident I can either hook in to the Chorus fibre and get the subsidised installation, or pay a small fortune to get hooked up to the Counties Power fibre which only has a teeny tiny number of ISP's on it. My neighbour is on the CP fibre and it is blisteringly fast, but he was connected before UFB came along.





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sbiddle
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  #1558373 24-May-2016 07:27
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kiwifidget:

 

sbiddle:

 

kiwifidget:

 

Pukekohe is the same. Most streets now have two fibre lines.

 

The local electricity lines company laid fibre all around the place several years ago, and even set up a local ISP (called Wired Country, which was later sold to Compass).

 

And now Chorus/OCL have been going round laying more fibre right beside it. 

 

 

 

If my memory serves me correctly that was all a P2P network so is unsuitable for delivering GPON services.

 

 

 

 

I dont know what GPON is, but as a resident I can either hook in to the Chorus fibre and get the subsidised installation, or pay a small fortune to get hooked up to the Counties Power fibre which only has a teeny tiny number of ISP's on it. My neighbour is on the CP fibre and it is blisteringly fast, but he was connected before UFB came along.

 

 

GPON and P2P are network architecture types. GPON is used for UFB and is a single OLT port shared between multiple users (typically 16). P2P means a dedicated single fibre runs to your property.

 

P2P can't compete with GPON on price because it's not shared bandwidth and ties up a whole port per user.

 

 


wired
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  #1558387 24-May-2016 08:27
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sbiddle:

 

kiwifidget:

 

sbiddle:

 

kiwifidget:

 

Pukekohe is the same. Most streets now have two fibre lines.

 

The local electricity lines company laid fibre all around the place several years ago, and even set up a local ISP (called Wired Country, which was later sold to Compass).

 

And now Chorus/OCL have been going round laying more fibre right beside it. 

 

 

 

If my memory serves me correctly that was all a P2P network so is unsuitable for delivering GPON services.

 

 

 

 

I dont know what GPON is, but as a resident I can either hook in to the Chorus fibre and get the subsidised installation, or pay a small fortune to get hooked up to the Counties Power fibre which only has a teeny tiny number of ISP's on it. My neighbour is on the CP fibre and it is blisteringly fast, but he was connected before UFB came along.

 

 

GPON and P2P are network architecture types. GPON is used for UFB and is a single OLT port shared between multiple users (typically 16). P2P means a dedicated single fibre runs to your property.

 

P2P can't compete with GPON on price because it's not shared bandwidth and ties up a whole port per user.

 

 

 

 

To convert the Counties Power network from p2p to PON would require the removal of the switches in the roadside cabinets are replacing them with splitters. So the base architectures were the same (one feeder to a cabinet where it was split to serve each premises) but GPON/EPON was more expensive to deploy than the P2P when that network was built (2002/2003). Pricing has changed substantially now making PON more cost effective.


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