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  Reply # 1626210 9-Sep-2016 07:43
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MikeB4:
kiwifidget:

 

DarkShadow:

 

 

 

macuser: Hi Chorus is this the entire network or will it be rolled out piece by piece?

 

 

 

Going by their press release, I believe it's the former

 

 

 

Chorus has today announced that it will extend its one gigabit (1Gbps) residential and SME business fibre broadband service across its entire Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB) footprint from 1 October 2016.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The keyword here is "from". If they said "on 1 Oct" then you could assume everywhere at once. But the use of "from" would imply a process starting on that date.

 



I read as commencing from 1/10 "giga" speeds will be available on their installed UFB network and not a graduated rollout starting 1/10.

 

To be sure, it's just semantics. The word "from" can be interpreted either way in this context, and maybe it was chosen for it's ambiguity.

 

 





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  Reply # 1626214 9-Sep-2016 07:49
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Behodar:

 

sbiddle: Abysmal uptake? I assume you're not talking about NZ because there certainly isn't abysmal uptake of fibre in NZ unless your defintion of abysmal is very different from the dictionary!

 

Indeed. The latest stats that I've seen show uptake at almost 25% - far from abysmal!

 

 

And you can argue all you want about dysfunctional process, draconian consent issues and poor quality work but the reality is the biggest issue facing UFB right now is that demand is exceeding even the best case predictions.

 

I still don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.

 

 

 

 

 

 


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  Reply # 1626215 9-Sep-2016 07:50
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I see as the same as for example " Sky will increase its price from 1/10"




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  Reply # 1626773 9-Sep-2016 21:30
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sbiddle:

 

don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.

 

 

 

 

As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).


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  Reply # 1626779 9-Sep-2016 21:40
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sbiddle:

 

 

 

I still don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then. 

 

 

Will it matter? It's likely 4G and 5G mobile data will give high speed data anywhere fibre goes and plenty of other places as well. With with advances in mobile technology there's a fair chance FTTH will be about as useful copper is starting to become now.





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  Reply # 1626782 9-Sep-2016 21:48
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Technofreak:

sbiddle:


 


I still don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then. 



Will it matter? It's likely 4G and 5G mobile data will give high speed data anywhere fibre goes and plenty of other places as well. With with advances in mobile technology there's a fair chance FTTH will be about as useful copper is starting to become now.



Like how wifi made Ethernet obsolete? :D

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  Reply # 1626814 10-Sep-2016 00:45

I think the "from 1/10" refers to when Chorus will make it available. That's not to guarantee that your ISP will be ready by 1/10 to make the switch if you want to. But they've been doing 1G in Dunedin for over a year and a half, so I reckon if your ISP has their ducks in a row, you'll be able to order it on 1st. I heard MyRepublic's radio ad this morning, and it didn't mention any regional restrictions.


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  Reply # 1626821 10-Sep-2016 03:55
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This is good news (was wondering if would great anything from Chorus after the LFC plans were announced) but this isn't exactly Gigatown. Sure the speeds are the same. But as I understand it, Gigatown is subsided so the wholesale price is the same as per the entry level 100/20 speeds elsewhere. (ISPs still do have to pay normally for the backhaul of course.) Hence many ISPs offering Gigatown for similar price as their 100/20 offerings.

This is priced at the current 200/100 level rising to 200/200 next year, which seems to be reflected in MyRepublic's offering. Don't get me wrong I'm not saying Chorus should have done the same, just that it's not the same.

As for the mobile argument all I will say is that speed is only one component. All home user services have a high degree of contention at various points but mobile services tend to push this to another level. Even if you can regularly achieve 500 mbit plus on your mobile connection, how much data is your ISP going to be happy with you using and at what price? Building a lot more cell sites helps but that isn't cheap either and does need the back haul in place albeit not FTTH levels. It may make sense in some places but this doesn't mean FTTH wasn't a good idea for NZ.

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  Reply # 1626835 10-Sep-2016 07:19
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Screeb:

sbiddle:


don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.


 



As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.





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  Reply # 1626883 10-Sep-2016 10:02
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BarTender:
Screeb: As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

That article doesn't state what FTTB actually means in practice (what kind of non-fibre run is used, and how long it is.) I personally wouldn't consider FTTB/FTTN an equivalent to FTTH, except maybe if the in-building run is ethernet... and definitely not if it is a several hundred metre long DSL line.





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  Reply # 1627011 10-Sep-2016 15:08
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BarTender:
Screeb: As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

No they don't include FTTN. It's only FTTH and FTTB. The fact that many dwellings are MDU is irrelevant. I'm simply showing that sbiddle's statement is clearly not true.

 

 

 

Detruire:

 

That article doesn't state what FTTB actually means in practice (what kind of non-fibre run is used, and how long it is.) I personally wouldn't consider FTTB/FTTN an equivalent to FTTH, except maybe if the in-building run is ethernet... and definitely not if it is a several hundred metre long DSL line.

 

 

 

 

Here are their definitions. http://ftthcouncil.eu/documents/Publications/FCGA%20-%20Definition%20of%20Terms%20-%20Revisions2016.pdf

 

They have a strict definition of FTTB -

 

This FTTB definition excludes architectures where the optical fiber cable terminates in a public space away from an external wall of one building (for example an operator’s street-side cabinet) and where the access path continues to the building over a physical medium other than optical fiber (for example copper loops, power cables, wireless and/or coax).

 

I doubt very many of the internal networks in those places are so bad that people can't get fibre-like speeds (say 100Mbps). Certainly no worse that most people's WiFi here. Regardless, that's up to the individual building's owners. The network is in place for the operator, so the point remains.


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  Reply # 1627058 10-Sep-2016 17:17
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Technofreak:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

I still don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then. 

 

 

Will it matter? It's likely 4G and 5G mobile data will give high speed data anywhere fibre goes and plenty of other places as well. With with advances in mobile technology there's a fair chance FTTH will be about as useful copper is starting to become now.

 

 

Do you have some inside knowledge about the laws of physics changing to make this possible?

 

 


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  Reply # 1627084 10-Sep-2016 17:20
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Detruire:

 

BarTender:
Screeb: As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

That article doesn't state what FTTB actually means in practice (what kind of non-fibre run is used, and how long it is.) I personally wouldn't consider FTTB/FTTN an equivalent to FTTH, except maybe if the in-building run is ethernet... and definitely not if it is a several hundred metre long DSL line.

 

 

Huge numbers of MDU's in Singapore and Hong Kong have FTTB and Ethernet/VDSL2/Coax inside the building. These are sold as fibre services even though they're not a FTTH connection in the way we would measure them, ie fibre directly from the street to the apartment.

 

 


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  Reply # 1627087 10-Sep-2016 17:28
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lots of fiber to the basement going in sydney and melbourne now too, as the NBN is basically stuffed the ISPs are doing it themselves.





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  Reply # 1627153 10-Sep-2016 19:31
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sidefx: Like how wifi made Ethernet obsolete? :D

 

Ethernet certainly isn't obsolete, but many households I know of only use WiFi, so for them it might as well be obsolete.  I don't consider fibre will obsolete either, but I do question the need for wholesale FTTH.

 

 

 

sbiddle:

 

Technofreak:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

I still don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then. 

 

 

Will it matter? It's likely 4G and 5G mobile data will give high speed data anywhere fibre goes and plenty of other places as well. With with advances in mobile technology there's a fair chance FTTH will be about as useful copper is starting to become now.

 

 

Do you have some inside knowledge about the laws of physics changing to make this possible?

 

 

What laws of physics are you talking about.  I didn't say 4G or 5G speeds will match fibre speeds. What I said is they will give high speed data pretty well anywhere fibre will be present.

 

Most residential premises will not need the full capability of fibre, the speeds provided by 4G and 5G will be more than sufficient.  Hell my 50 Mbit download VDSL connection does everything I need, sure I may not have the demands some on here may have from their internet.  Figures of 10Gb are being quoted as being realistically achievable speeds for 5G , I cannot see how this won't be more than adequate for many users.

 

There will be a household 4G or 5G receivers which will also act as the router for that premise. There will be no need to have fibre to many houses. That being the case, the cost of fibre provisioning must be questionable.  

 

I don't expect it's changed all that much in recent times, when I worked in the Telecoms industry about 80% of the cost of a Telecoms network was in the outside plant. It you can do away with a lot of the outside plant then your costs of providing a service decreases significantly.

 

In the not so distant future I can see mobile operators being able to provision data more quickly, easily and cheaper than in the ground systems.  Hence my original statement about the usefulness of FTTH.





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