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  Reply # 1627154 10-Sep-2016 19:54
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Twenty years ago, most of us were on 33.6 or "56" kb/s connections. Those are absolutely laughable now. Today, 100 Mb/s connections are commonplace. In another twenty years I'm sure that we'll have people complaining that their gigabit connection is "like dialup speed". It's a fact that wired networks will always be faster and more efficient than wireless (you can never get rid of the noise floor), and by having a top-of-the-line wired network in place NZ will keep ahead of the curve for a long time to come, and that's ultimately a very good thing.


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  Reply # 1627160 10-Sep-2016 20:23
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I agree, I think its disingenuous to downplay the NZ FTTH effort.

 

Comparing 4G with fibre right now is no comparison (I mean c'mon, unlimited data at 100/200/1000Mbps for very reasonable prices.. versus 6-10GB on mobile?); and in the future? I suspect the land-line competition will always mean a better deal with the opportunity to easily scale to multi-Gbps speed far easier.

 

I firmly believe in a decade or two we'll think of the NZ FTTH as a significant milestone, particularly considering our low-population density and topography.


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  Reply # 1627172 10-Sep-2016 20:45
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Technofreak:

 

 

 

What laws of physics are you talking about.  I didn't say 4G or 5G speeds will match fibre speeds. What I said is they will give high speed data pretty well anywhere fibre will be present.

 

 

 

 

high speed yes, high data caps no, look at what the average household in nz is using at the moment, over 100gb per month.

 

you couldnt support that over a 3/4/5g connection. you need physical connections like fibre to be able to support the every increasing bandwidth being used.

 

 

 

speed isnt everything, its a nice to have for most people, its the data they care about


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  Reply # 1627175 10-Sep-2016 20:51
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allan: At least you're not waiting until 2019, which is projected date past our house. May have moved by then...

 

Same for me.








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Reply # 1627944 12-Sep-2016 15:39
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Behodar:

 

Twenty years ago, most of us were on 33.6 or "56" kb/s connections. Those are absolutely laughable now. Today, 100 Mb/s connections are commonplace. In another twenty years I'm sure that we'll have people complaining that their gigabit connection is "like dialup speed". It's a fact that wired networks will always be faster and more efficient than wireless (you can never get rid of the noise floor), and by having a top-of-the-line wired network in place NZ will keep ahead of the curve for a long time to come, and that's ultimately a very good thing.

 

 

 

 

LOL I can recall those speeds!!!!   and the ticking of the sharemilkers  electric fence!!!

 

 

 

I've installed ethernet in our house recently as the local WiFi was getting up to 6-8 other wifi networks showing on my Android tablet, including two printers!!...From what I have read here wifi can hit a ceiling on the amount of data it can handle..... Also I see fibre/ethernet as much more secure and fire is I assume immune to electrical interference from the suns solar flares etc..??

 

 

 

Rgds.....Laurie

 

 




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Reply # 1627946 12-Sep-2016 15:45
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BarTender:
Screeb:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

 

 

Thanks as I actually have a query about that here in Alexandra COT....   I found out from the bloke who installed the ethernet cabling system in our house a few months back that Alexandra's copper network was installed into ducts/ducting  (he was an ex Telecom Tech and one of the team who did the work) so would/could this be the same as used for fibre???? So reducing the costs/work involved in putting fibre into Alexandra??...I am hoping some one here has the tech background to advise one way or the other...????

 

 

 

Regards

 

 

 

Laurie

 

Alexandra (another sunny day BTW)  

 

Central Otago


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  Reply # 1628043 12-Sep-2016 18:07
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LWJCarroll:

 

BarTender:
Screeb:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

 

 

Thanks as I actually have a query about that here in Alexandra COT....   I found out from the bloke who installed the ethernet cabling system in our house a few months back that Alexandra's copper network was installed into ducts/ducting  (he was an ex Telecom Tech and one of the team who did the work) so would/could this be the same as used for fibre???? So reducing the costs/work involved in putting fibre into Alexandra??...I am hoping some one here has the tech background to advise one way or the other...????

 

 

 

Regards

 

 

 

Laurie

 

Alexandra (another sunny day BTW)  

 

Central Otago

 

 

Copper infrastructure in ducts is pretty common, and where possible this is reused for UFB.

 

 


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  Reply # 1635878 19-Sep-2016 14:03
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I see that My Republic are offering it at the same price. Any other ISPs announcing it yet?


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  Reply # 1635949 19-Sep-2016 16:14
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What connection speed does 'Gigatown' actually average?





Mike

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  Reply # 1635953 19-Sep-2016 16:19
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MikeAqua:

 

What connection speed does 'Gigatown' actually average?

 

 

 

 

Depends, WILDLY, on how you intend to measure it :-)

 

There are accurate and reasonable answers between about 60Mbps and 940Mbps that in most cases won't mean there's anything wrong with the LFC or ISP network.

 

Cheers -N

 

 




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  Reply # 1635954 19-Sep-2016 16:20
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sbiddle:

 

LWJCarroll:

 

BarTender:
Screeb:

 

sbiddle:

 

 

 

don't think most NZers yet comprehend that by 2019 we will have the best internet infrastrstrure in the world with FTTH to over 80% of premises. There are unlikely to be any other countries that come close to this by then.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As at September last year, both South Korea and UAE had >74% household FTTH/B subscriptions (not just coverage), Singapore 72%, Qatar 70%, and Hong Kong 66% (source). In early 2008, Japan had 86.5% household FTTH/B coverage (OECD (2010)).

 


The main difference between the above countries and NZ is the vast majority of homes in those countries are MDU apartments which would have been recently built or retrofitted. And do they include FTTN in the same numbers as FTTH. As one could argue the FTTN done in 2008 by Telecom in the day is roughly the same delivering VDSL.
NZ is for the most part single dwellings. So trenching and rolling past so many houses is a mammoth effort.

 

 

 

Thanks as I actually have a query about that here in Alexandra COT....   I found out from the bloke who installed the ethernet cabling system in our house a few months back that Alexandra's copper network was installed into ducts/ducting  (he was an ex Telecom Tech and one of the team who did the work) so would/could this be the same as used for fibre???? So reducing the costs/work involved in putting fibre into Alexandra??...I am hoping some one here has the tech background to advise one way or the other...????

 

 

 

Regards

 

 

 

Laurie

 

Alexandra (another sunny day BTW)  

 

Central Otago

 

 

Copper infrastructure in ducts is pretty common, and where possible this is reused for UFB.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the info!!....Laurie


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