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212 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 2140891 7-Dec-2018 07:19
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hio77:

 

atomeara:

 

There is a huge cost for ISPs to deliver the backend network that can support this kind of speed from more than 1 or 2 users. 

 

You start to look at 100Gb backhaul and handovers (or multiples of 100Gb). None of this is cheap. I would not expect to see many ISPS offering this any time soon on mass to consumers except for 1 or 2 who want to use it for marketing and I can bet there backhaul and transit won't be increased to the same scale.

 

I can't see a lot of consumers being that keen to pay $400 - $800 per month for it.

 

 

I can certainly agree on the costs but... some of the larger rsps surely would have the bandwidth for that already...

 

 

 

 

Well from the press release last year 2d are running 100Gb Chorus DWDM backhaul ring/ladder around NZ. So when you think that every handover loads onto that 100Gb until it gets to Auckland, sure some may take the 2nd path but if you are actually talking about filling up near 10Gb then it won't go far.

 

Spark / Vodafone and Vocus Group all own fibre in the ground so they can step it up with lower on going costs than everyone else. But there are still huge input costs. I also doubt the 4 big ISPs will run to offer that, I imagine it would be more like MyRepublic for marketing rights.

 

And even then will the CDN networks support that, Spark the biggest ISP won't even peer within NZ at Peering exchange. Latency starts to become an impact on speed once you are talking USA, etc

 

While Chorus are pushing ahead with the trial, I am unsure when it will actually go mass market, I've seen various things from between 2019 to 2025.

 

I am also skeptical on consumer demand going bigger than 1Gb, to be honest I think most sites around 100Mb-200Mb, we will see what the next latest and greatest technologies are that drive that. 

 

Generally for business we only see 1Gb or bigger for large backup and replication type services where it will use the whole pipe for a few hours a day.

 

For consumer some backups / updates can be pretty big (be it game / windows / etc) but even the highest quality streaming video struggles to need anything over 100Mb. While I am sure they can keep taking video from 1080p, 4k, 8k, 16k, etc there is a point where it is only marketing spin and the human eye can't actually see anything more.

 

 


272 posts

Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2140974 7-Dec-2018 10:21
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freitasm:

 

Johnsonville! @NickMack you know there's someone here...

 

 

I'll see what I can do... :-)

 

Nick


 
 
 
 


1268 posts

Uber Geek
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  Reply # 2141024 7-Dec-2018 10:36
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It is interesting to see the no consumer demand argument whenever there is mention of speed increase.

The internet is to me is about services or more specifically service delivery. which basically comes down to people watching TV.

Until LTE becomes standard on all devices and telephony becomes pervasive across devices - not just phones, I dont see it changing much.




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67 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 2141134 7-Dec-2018 12:35
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TwoSeven: It is interesting to see the no consumer demand argument whenever there is mention of speed increase.

The internet is to me is about services or more specifically service delivery. which basically comes down to people watching TV.

Until LTE becomes standard on all devices and telephony becomes pervasive across devices - not just phones, I dont see it changing much.

 

 

 

Yea its non argument. There's always demand. Even if its just the enthusiasts, gamers and techies etc the ones who want the fastest there is. That's still a market the ISPs can tap into. 


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  Reply # 2141152 7-Dec-2018 13:07
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Zepanda66:

 

TwoSeven: It is interesting to see the no consumer demand argument whenever there is mention of speed increase.

The internet is to me is about services or more specifically service delivery. which basically comes down to people watching TV.

Until LTE becomes standard on all devices and telephony becomes pervasive across devices - not just phones, I dont see it changing much.

 

 

 

Yea its non argument. There's always demand. Even if its just the enthusiasts, gamers and techies etc the ones who want the fastest there is. That's still a market the ISPs can tap into. 

 

 

But the market is so small many won't bother launching it in the short to medium because it needs to be priced accordingly.

 

 


126 posts

Master Geek
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  Reply # 2141232 7-Dec-2018 16:05
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cyril7:

 

How much will be actual 10G to the customer, or in reality 10GPon with CPE that just have 1G UNI on them that provide low local loop contested access.

 

Cyril

 

 

Agreed. Some of the 10 Gbps ONTs don't have 10 Gbps customer ports on them. The 10 Gbps means you can put more premises on the same feeder fibre/splitter and provide them with less contended 1 Gbps ports. 

 

The maximum rate from a 10 Gbps port is probably going to be 8.6 Gbps due to the FEC etc. overheads. For the ONTs that do have 10 Gbps ports I expect that they will offer 2 or 5 or 8 Gbps downstream plans. A 2 Gbps plan will be easier for an ISP to support and a 2 x speed upgrade is still worth having.


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