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Banana?
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  Reply # 1980301 20-Mar-2018 08:54
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I'm really happy with my install. It obviously goes in the conduit that my copper was/is in. It took them about an hour to get it into my house from the street. They did no digging, and we don't have a fence.

 

Job is really tidy, and there are no issues.

 

Mine is obviously an easy install, house is on poles, and it already had a conduit they could blow the fibre through.


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  Reply # 1980335 20-Mar-2018 09:10
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Theclaytons:

 

But yet, we are talking about only a a handful here...makes me think the majority of people are happy with the install they have received....

 

 

The whole idea of standards is that almost all installs will be trouble free for a long time. It's the sub-contractor who signs off the job and it's reasonable that Chorus would assume that the job is acceptable quality. I don't think it's hysteria over a tiny number of issues, rather the reason there's a lot of noise around this are the potentially huge costs to the customer of fixing botched jobs as they are discovered over time.

 

Alan


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  Reply # 1980340 20-Mar-2018 09:18
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trig42:

 

I'm really happy with my install. It obviously goes in the conduit that my copper was/is in. It took them about an hour to get it into my house from the street. They did no digging, and we don't have a fence.

 

 

That's the ideal install! My understanding is that some/much of the buried copper conduit is either damaged or there are other reasons it can't be used. 

 

Alan


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  Reply # 1980364 20-Mar-2018 09:43
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Ha, they just laid the fibre over the top of my garden. Not even buried .


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  Reply # 1980369 20-Mar-2018 09:49
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I'm on a shared driveway and my neighbour wanted to have fibre installed (I'm only renting and didn't really want fibre as I'm quite happy with my VDSL). Our driveway is off another shared driveway, all 12 or so houses down the main shared driveway had fibre run to them, which made sense to me. They underdrounded it from the road to the top of my driveway, then ran it along a fence (just the cable attached to the fence, no conduit, but I assume the cable is rain/sun resistant). Near the end of the fence they cut a slot across the driveway toward my house and laid the cable in that, then sealed it up. Finally they undergrounded it another meter or so and then have it popping up out of the ground with some sort of cap on the end of the cable and attached to a little green plastic post that says what it is. I guess this will be as much as they do for my house, since I don't want to installed. I've seen other houses around mine that also have these little posts with the end of the cable attached to them.

 

I guess this is pretty standard?


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  Reply # 1980409 20-Mar-2018 10:33
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MurrayM:

 

just the cable attached to the fence, no conduit

 

 

This is the 5mm black plastic tube yes? It's actually just an empty pipe. When it's time for you to order fibre, they will come and insert the actual fibre inside the tube.


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  Reply # 1980423 20-Mar-2018 10:56
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I'm very happy with our install. 

 

There was lot of faffing around and misinformation by Chorus's contractor Transfield to start with to start with, but in the end a satisfactory install exactly where we wanted it (eventually).





Mike

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  Reply # 1980432 20-Mar-2018 11:22
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DarkShadow:

 

MurrayM:

 

just the cable attached to the fence, no conduit

 

 

This is the 5mm black plastic tube yes? It's actually just an empty pipe. When it's time for you to order fibre, they will come and insert the actual fibre inside the tube.

 

 

Yeah, "5mm black plastic tube" describes it exactly. So it's empty? They'll have to come back at some future date to install the actual fibre?


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  Reply # 1980509 20-Mar-2018 14:12
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It's a single length of fibre that gets blown from the street to the ONT (box) in the house.
When someone eventually signs up for fibre at that address they will install more tubing (ducting) right into the house and have a continuous length of fibre blown all the way to the end.


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  Reply # 1980763 20-Mar-2018 23:47
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KrazyKid:

 

It's a single length of fibre that gets blown from the street to the ONT (box) in the house.
When someone eventually signs up for fibre at that address they will install more tubing (ducting) right into the house and have a continuous length of fibre blown all the way to the end.

 

 

No, the fibre in from the street gets terminated in a box outside on the wall, the ETP (external termination point).  Another (different) fibre is connected from the ETP to the ONT inside the house.  I am surprised that they would only have installed the conduit - when my neigbours at my Lower Hutt flat wanted fibre, they installed fibre to all three flats down the right-of-way, including mine.  It is terminated at the ETP on my flat, as I am living elsewhere at the moment and do not need an Internet connection there.  It was an easy install as our copper was overhead on poles, so they ran the fibre the same way.  But that is what they are supposed to do now with right-of-way installs - do it all at once, to all the properties, but not put in the fibre from the ETP into the house until a connection is requested.


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  Reply # 1981245 21-Mar-2018 22:02
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fe31nz:

 

No, the fibre in from the street gets terminated in a box outside on the wall, the ETP (external termination point).  Another (different) fibre is connected from the ETP to the ONT inside the house.  

 

 

That is correct. Typically Cat6+fiber is used to go between the ONT and ETP since the ETP is usually next to (or replaces) the existing ETP box. The fiber comes in via microduct, and inside the etp is spliced to the fiber cable going into the house. 

 

At the ONT, the phone output runs back out the same Cat6+fiber to the etp where it is also simply spliced into the existing phone reticulation. This way they only need to run one cable to do two jobs. 

 

The Cat6+fiber cable also has a more flexible bend radius. With blown fiber, it needs big wide corners, where as the standard cable can bend around much tighter corners. 





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  Reply # 1982099 23-Mar-2018 14:17
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sbiddle:

 

acjh58:

 

The issue here is both economic and political. Economically, the cost of UFB was estimated without including the access drop costs (some will dispute that, but you see the reality of it now). At least two models predicted that the drop costs would be approximately the same as the core infrastructure costs - if done to normal telecommunications network standards. If charged to the consumer wanting UFB access, the drop cost (typically thousands of dollars) would probably have been a major disincentive for UFB uptake. 

 

 

In the very early days these costs were similar - around $3k per premises passed for the network build, and around $3k for the install.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Had a client out the back of Chch Airport. There is major fibre running along pound road. To run it 3 feet (1m to you millennials ) so there is an end point at their gate - $15k. That ended that conversation there and then.

 

 





nunz

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  Reply # 1982158 23-Mar-2018 14:53
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Yet in Franz Josef, where there was no fibre, I got around 1.5km of fibre put into 2 x different properties 8mm apart for only $16k. 

 

 


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  Reply # 1982208 23-Mar-2018 15:58
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nunz:

 

 

 

Had a client out the back of Chch Airport. There is major fibre running along pound road. To run it 3 feet (1m to you millennials ) so there is an end point at their gate - $15k. That ended that conversation there and then.

 

 

 

 

Common misconception that you can simply tap into a fibre running past your gate (unless it has been specifically designed for that). Can be done with RBI fibre in special circumstances, but often the fibre/duct arrangement may be cabinet backhaul or similar with no provision for direct customer connection - thus a much longer than expected fibre installation.


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  Reply # 1982332 23-Mar-2018 18:50
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sbiddle:

 

If they're removing all the existing concrete for the driveway it'll simply leave the exposed cable which can simply be concreted over - it's not going to damage it.

 

 

Not if they're doing their job properly... Once all the concrete is removed they have to re-level and compact the ground before laying any surface (concrete, asphalt, pavers, whatever).

 

A load of road-base will be going in (big sharp rocks). Getting finer and rolled, finer, and then rolled.. And if concrete, reo'd.

 

How do you do this with a fibre running across that's less than 400mm deep?? The moment any sub-base is compacted against any cable/fibre, the cable/fibre will come off worse than a rock.

 

This isn't a housing slab (even if it is concrete).

 

Driveways are built to a higher spec.... You're not driving a 2 ton SUV into your lounge every day.


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