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Topic # 231971 23-Mar-2018 11:52
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I have been told that, when you get fibre broadband installed, unless you request otherwise, your old copper wire landline phones are disconnected and your phones are instead connected through your new fibre installation.

 

When your landline phones are integrated with fibre, this means that, if there is a power cut, or if you turn your fibre broadband off, then your phones also go down. Therefore, in the event of a power cut as a result of an earthquake etc, your old landline phone cannot be used and you are dependent on using mobile data on a mobile phone.

 

At present, we can turn our broadband modem off when it is not in use and this has no effect on our landline copper wire phones or any other systems, such as the house alarm etc.

 

I understand that, if you are getting fibre broadband installed and you want to retain your old copper wire landline phones, this is possible but it costs a lot more (as much as $50 per month) to run both naked broadband and a copper wire phone system.

 

Can anyone confirm please that I have correctly stated the position above.

 

Also, I would be interested to know whether anyone who has fibre broadband has thought it’s worthwhile to pay the extra to retain the old copper wire landline phone system.

 

If your phones are integrated with your fibre broadband system, do you leave your broadband modem on all the time or do you turn it off when you are not using internet in order to save power and the amount of RF in your house?

 

Also, when your phones are integrated with fibre, in the event of power cuts, have you experienced any difficulties with other electrical systems in your home, such as alarm systems etc?

 

Thanks very much for your comments.


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'That VDSL Cat'
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  Reply # 1982009 23-Mar-2018 11:58
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The answer is, It depends.

 

 

 

If you opt for a provider who uses the ONT to provide a phone service, it does not matter if your router is on. purely that the ONT is on.

 

Assuming you battery backup your ONT (which there are easily available plugs in the likes of PBTech to allow this) then service will be retained till power is restored.





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  Reply # 1982015 23-Mar-2018 12:10
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Just be aware that the old copper network is gradually being phased out.

 

Also, the plain old telephone system (POTS) - the telephone 'exchange' is being replaced with VOIP as well.

 

So what you understand as the old bullet proof copper phone system is gradually vanishing anyway.

 

As stated above, I understand there is some power backup in the Fibre system - but you would need your own on premises power supply to power your ONT (The fibre termination unit on your premises) as well as power your own router or phone adapter unit or whatever else is normally required to make your VOIP calls work.

 

 

 

For the record I dont know anyone that turns their router on/off like you are suggesting. The power usage aspect will be microscopic and frequent switching on/off gear like that never seems to be good for it.

 

As to RF - Well - I cant (or wont) comment on that as I don't want to get into that sort of discussion.





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  Reply # 1982025 23-Mar-2018 12:27
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robjg63:

 

 

 

As stated above, I understand there is some power backup in the Fibre system - but you would need your own on premises power supply to power your ONT (The fibre termination unit on your premises) as well as power your own router or phone adapter unit or whatever else is normally required to make your VOIP calls work.

 

 

 

 

Yep, Because we use PON technology the only power required is at the exchange and the users end, meaning in the event of a power outage the Exchanges battery/generator backup would kick in and as long as you had some form of UPS for your ONT you'd be ok (with ONT voice that is, Router ATA would require both to be powered).

 

In regards to the phone most cordless phones with more than 1 handset will allow you to leave the base station in the cradle and it will power the unit (allowing you to use a secondary handset to make/receive calls).

 

Alarms also are normally installed with backup batteries which will keep them running in the event of an outage.

 

 

 

Also, as far as the OP is concerned your assumptions on cost for a copper line are mostly correct. Your provider would be paying two line costs for a copper landline along with Fibre data. this usually equates to a copper charge of around $45-55 depending on your provider. (and as Rob said this is slowly being phased out in favour of VoIP which has the same downsides of ONT Voice)

 

 


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  Reply # 1982046 23-Mar-2018 12:57
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robjg63:

 

Just be aware that the old copper network is gradually being phased out.

 

Also, the plain old telephone system (POTS) - the telephone 'exchange' is being replaced with VOIP as well.

 

So what you understand as the old bullet proof copper phone system is gradually vanishing anyway.

 

 

Will still be powered from the DSLAM, much like you get with current DSL.

 

How much battery there is to supply that or generation is a different question all together.

 

 

 

robjg63:

 

For the record I dont know anyone that turns their router on/off like you are suggesting. The power usage aspect will be microscopic and frequent switching on/off gear like that never seems to be good for it.

 

 

Large number of people who do this still. Drives me mad when i'm working on data exercises! 





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  Reply # 1982062 23-Mar-2018 13:35
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hio77: Large number of people who do this still. Drives me mad when i'm working on data exercises! 

 

Around 15-20% of the customer base from memory... sealed








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  Reply # 1982176 23-Mar-2018 15:08
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Thanks a lot for your replies to date. At present, I have a router that provides not only Wi-Fi but it also has a switch which can turn Wi-Fi off and you can take a cord direct from the router to the computer and work without Wi-Fi actually running.

 

With the routers used with fibre broadband, does a similar system apply?

 

 


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  Reply # 1982177 23-Mar-2018 15:11
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a physical disable wifi button is a pretty standard button.

 

 

 

as a RSP, they are amazingly useful.





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  Reply # 1982184 23-Mar-2018 15:26
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robjg63:

 

For the record I dont know anyone that turns their router on/off like you are suggesting. The power usage aspect will be microscopic and frequent switching on/off gear like that never seems to be good for it.

 

As to RF - Well - I cant (or wont) comment on that as I don't want to get into that sort of discussion.

 

 

Correct - a waste of time. It cools and condensation can form on metal components causing corrosion and premature failure. So entirely pointless.

 

I'll happily comment on the RF from WiFi, cellphones etc. because people should be informed. It's low power and non-ionising, so of no consequence except a little heating at extremely close proximity. To claim otherwise is just quackery.


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  Reply # 1982191 23-Mar-2018 15:43
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cadman:

 

I'll happily comment on the RF from WiFi, cellphones etc. because people should be informed. It's low power and non-ionising, so of no consequence except a little heating at extremely close proximity. To claim otherwise is just quackery.

 

 

This one day, i was feeling a little funny.

 

 

 

i swear it was because my phone was on the inner side of my left pocket rather than the right.

 

 

 

Cellphones should be banned, this funny feeling was clearly the radiowaves killing me.





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  Reply # 1982273 23-Mar-2018 16:38
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hio77:

 

This one day, i was feeling a little funny.

 

i swear it was because my phone was on the inner side of my left pocket rather than the right.

 

Cellphones should be banned, this funny feeling was clearly the radiowaves killing me.

 

 

After I got my first cellphone, my cat died. This had never happened before so it's quite clearly related. If my cat was ill, it would have died before I got my cellphone.




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  Reply # 1982359 23-Mar-2018 21:01
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cadman:

 

hio77:

 

This one day, i was feeling a little funny.

 

i swear it was because my phone was on the inner side of my left pocket rather than the right.

 

Cellphones should be banned, this funny feeling was clearly the radiowaves killing me.

 

 

After I got my first cellphone, my cat died. This had never happened before so it's quite clearly related. If my cat was ill, it would have died before I got my cellphone.

 

 

https://www.safespaceprotection.com/emf-health-risks/emf-health-effects/wi-fi-router-dangers/

 

From the above site (and there are lots of similar ones):

 

Wireless routers – as well as Bluetooth and similar wireless systems – give off electromagnetic radiation in the low-gigahertz frequency. This level is considered potentially dangerous to people. And the danger is compounded by several factors

 

Just like the wireless signals themselves, the EMFs can pass through walls.

 

Most routers are not turned off at night, so you are exposed 24/7.

 

So it all depends on what sites you read and what you choose to believe! Therefore, why bother keeping your router going all day and all night if you only use it for 60 minutes per day?


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  Reply # 1982360 23-Mar-2018 21:07
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you need to look at the type of radiation it is

 

where are their studies? where are their results

 

anyone can stand there and say something is bad but with no evidence and backing it means little to nothing.

 

 


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  Reply # 1982368 23-Mar-2018 21:33
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frednz:

 

So it all depends on what sites you read and what you choose to believe! Therefore, why bother keeping your router going all day and all night if you only use it for 60 minutes per day?

 

 

Because I dont only use it for 60 minuites each day? I am using it 24/7 so that apps are available for notifications, so that I can stream music, so that things update, so that I can look at the house when I am out? I dont see the point in even getting fixed internet if all your usage is going to fit within 60 mins a day, just use a cheap 4G plan since the usage will be minimal.





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  Reply # 1982372 23-Mar-2018 21:45
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frednz:

 

cadman:

 

hio77:

 

This one day, i was feeling a little funny.

 

i swear it was because my phone was on the inner side of my left pocket rather than the right.

 

Cellphones should be banned, this funny feeling was clearly the radiowaves killing me.

 

 

After I got my first cellphone, my cat died. This had never happened before so it's quite clearly related. If my cat was ill, it would have died before I got my cellphone.

 

 

https://www.safespaceprotection.com/emf-health-risks/emf-health-effects/wi-fi-router-dangers/

 

From the above site (and there are lots of similar ones):

 

Wireless routers – as well as Bluetooth and similar wireless systems – give off electromagnetic radiation in the low-gigahertz frequency. This level is considered potentially dangerous to people. And the danger is compounded by several factors

 

Just like the wireless signals themselves, the EMFs can pass through walls.

 

Most routers are not turned off at night, so you are exposed 24/7.

 

So it all depends on what sites you read and what you choose to believe! Therefore, why bother keeping your router going all day and all night if you only use it for 60 minutes per day?

 

 

 

 

to play the game... I'll quote from that exact page.

 

 

 

 

Protecting Yourself and Your Family
You probably can’t get away from the effects of Wi-Fi. Even if you disconnect your own router – which probably would be very disruptive to your life – you are exposed to Wi-Fi at work

 

 

 

So, if you can't get away from it... What is the point of disrupting your own life?

 

For just the little price of $144, you can get rid of all the EMF!

 





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Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.


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  Reply # 1982394 23-Mar-2018 22:57
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What exactly are you wanting to achieve? If it is a guaranteed reliable phone, then you need a satellite phone. And even then, not all satellite phone companies provide full Coverage to NZ.

After the Kaikoura earthquake, the Kaikoura telephone exchange kept on working. But the earthquake destroyed all of its uplink connections. This meant that you could only make local calls to other people connected to the same exchange. Chorus had to send someone to the exchange with a satellite phone, so that any 111 calls could be patched through to the emergency services. So having a working landline phone wasn't actually much use in the immediate aftermath of the earthquake.





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