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7 posts

Wannabe Geek


Topic # 240626 17-Sep-2018 17:58
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Hello everybody,

 

I'm so sad for applying three times for a fibre in these two years. 

 

My broadband provider is Spark, and I knew that I need consents of all the neighbours who live in the shared driveway. Unfortunately, one of my neighbours won't give it, because he didn't want Chorus destroy the road in front of his house, even though Chorus will fix it(he said Chorus can only do very cheap jobs to recover the breaking road, but will not to be original).

 

I've spoken to him a few times and he won't change his mind. 

 

Can anyone knows how to make the underground job successfully without destroy the surface of my neighbour's road?

 

Thanks a lot!


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2092108 17-Sep-2018 18:02
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Offer to have it thrusted under his driveway.

 

Some of the installs are quite good depends on the crew doing the work.




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092110 17-Sep-2018 18:06
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rphenix:

 

Offer to have it thrusted under his driveway.

 

Some of the installs are quite good depends on the crew doing the work.

 

 

 

 

Thanks, friend!

 

So, your mean is that the Chorus can connect the fibre to my house underground at all? 


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  Reply # 2092118 17-Sep-2018 18:29
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You could pay for it to be put under the driveway 

 

John





Ex JohnR VodafoneNZ 17 years 4 days

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  Reply # 2092155 17-Sep-2018 20:04
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John is right, if you arrange the trenching/thrusting yourself, maybe that will appease your neighbour? Yes, you'll have to pay for it - but at least it will be done.


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2092158 17-Sep-2018 20:17
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why don't you get it install overhead ie power pole etc





 

 

 




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092197 17-Sep-2018 21:23
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Linux:

 

You could pay for it to be put under the driveway 

 

John

 

 

 

 

Pay to Chorus??  ok, I'll contact them and try to use your idea, thanks man!




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092199 17-Sep-2018 21:24
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biggal:

 

why don't you get it install overhead ie power pole etc

 

 

 

 

no poles at all.. sad!


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Ultimate Geek
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  Reply # 2092218 17-Sep-2018 23:03
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So does the planned path Chorus mapped out use the shared driveway or cut across the neighbours driveway then onto the other sections 


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  Reply # 2092234 18-Sep-2018 00:08
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How do the telephone wires currently get to your house and that neighbors house? Maybe there is existing conduits that can be reused, so no digging needed.

How is the shared driveway setup? There would have to be either a cross lease or easements connecting you and your neighbor. They would probably give rights to allow access for fibre.

Do a full title search on both your property and your neighbors property. Then contact your local Citizen's Advice Bureau. They normally run sessions where you can speak to a lawyer for free. Take the title search results with you, and that lawyer should be able to quickly tell you if it is worthwhile paying to take legal action against your neighbor to force them to agree to have fibre installed.

The difficult neighbour is likely to quickly change their mind. When they realize that saying no to fibre, means that they Will have to spend their own money on legal fees. And that they would probably be ordered to give permission for fibre to be installed.

Otherwise how friendly are you with the other neighbors in the area who are not part of the shared driveway? See if they would be willing to let you run an Ethernet cable over the fence to their ONT. Or setup a fixed WiFi link to their house. The ONT can support more than 1 separate internet connection. So you can still have a completely independent connection from your neighbor.





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  Reply # 2092324 18-Sep-2018 09:25
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When was the last time you applied for this? The rules on consent changed recently - so it would be worth giving Chorus a call.

 

If I recall correctly, a micro-trench or similar no longer requires consent and is considered a category 2 install - it's only if there's literal digging up of driveways etc that consent is required. It may be that Chorus' plan needs updating.

 

Also it's pretty common for shared driveways to have a conduit beneath the driveway that provides connection to the properties along it - check your plans and have Chorus' check the hub at the bottom of the driveway - they will be able to tell you if they can route via that. 

 

From my own personal experience, it definitely depends on which Chorus (or subcontractor) crew you get - some are better than others. For example our install entailed using the underground conduit but the first team failed to get the wire through, threw up their hands and went back to head office - next thing we knew there was a plan wanting the whole driveway be dug up.

 

Instead, we insisted they try again with a different crew as there was (in the opinion of the builder who built the houses) plenty of space in that conduit. Sure enough, next crew that tried got the job done within an hour...




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092332 18-Sep-2018 09:34
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grimwulf:

 

When was the last time you applied for this? The rules on consent changed recently - so it would be worth giving Chorus a call.

 

If I recall correctly, a micro-trench or similar no longer requires consent and is considered a category 2 install - it's only if there's literal digging up of driveways etc that consent is required. It may be that Chorus' plan needs updating.

 

Also it's pretty common for shared driveways to have a conduit beneath the driveway that provides connection to the properties along it - check your plans and have Chorus' check the hub at the bottom of the driveway - they will be able to tell you if they can route via that. 

 

From my own personal experience, it definitely depends on which Chorus (or subcontractor) crew you get - some are better than others. For example our install entailed using the underground conduit but the first team failed to get the wire through, threw up their hands and went back to head office - next thing we knew there was a plan wanting the whole driveway be dug up.

 

Instead, we insisted they try again with a different crew as there was (in the opinion of the builder who built the houses) plenty of space in that conduit. Sure enough, next crew that tried got the job done within an hour...

 

 

 

 

This is very very useful to me! Thank you so much!




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Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092339 18-Sep-2018 09:39
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Aredwood: How do the telephone wires currently get to your house and that neighbors house? Maybe there is existing conduits that can be reused, so no digging needed.

How is the shared driveway setup? There would have to be either a cross lease or easements connecting you and your neighbor. They would probably give rights to allow access for fibre.

Do a full title search on both your property and your neighbors property. Then contact your local Citizen's Advice Bureau. They normally run sessions where you can speak to a lawyer for free. Take the title search results with you, and that lawyer should be able to quickly tell you if it is worthwhile paying to take legal action against your neighbor to force them to agree to have fibre installed.

The difficult neighbour is likely to quickly change their mind. When they realize that saying no to fibre, means that they Will have to spend their own money on legal fees. And that they would probably be ordered to give permission for fibre to be installed.

Otherwise how friendly are you with the other neighbors in the area who are not part of the shared driveway? See if they would be willing to let you run an Ethernet cable over the fence to their ONT. Or setup a fixed WiFi link to their house. The ONT can support more than 1 separate internet connection. So you can still have a completely independent connection from your neighbor.

 

 

 

Thank you for reminding me to take legal measures, I'll try this way if this application is still failed. 

 

 

 

Thanks a lot!


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  Reply # 2092344 18-Sep-2018 09:44
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Will Chorus come out, take a look and give you a plan so you can decide whether to proceed or not? To get this far do you formally apply for connection then change your mind if you don't like the plan?

 

Cheers

 

JohnO

 

 




7 posts

Wannabe Geek


  Reply # 2092359 18-Sep-2018 10:07
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kryptonjohn:

 

Will Chorus come out, take a look and give you a plan so you can decide whether to proceed or not? To get this far do you formally apply for connection then change your mind if you don't like the plan?

 

Cheers

 

JohnO

 

 

 

 

 

 

They did give me the plan but the process stuck with my neighbour because of some objections, and no response at all after that. 

 

sad! :~~~


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