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Oblivian
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  #2764572 21-Aug-2021 22:33
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Believe it is still used as a pure ONT - Managed connection. And comes down to the ISP if they use it as RGW/Residential Gateway (which may have an associated cost)

 

https://www.chorus.co.nz/q/model-type-300 

 

https://sp.chorus.co.nz/product/rgw-ont-residential-gateway-ont/tech-specs 

 

https://sp.chorus.co.nz/product/rgw-ont-residential-gateway-ont/overview 

 

Chorus 3rd Generation ONT (Type 300) can turn into a residential gateway (RGW) with Wi-Fi capabilities. Please check with your service provider to confirm if your ONT is setup in RGW mode to provide Wi-Fi.


cyril7
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  #2764634 22-Aug-2021 07:57
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The answer has been explained in this thread multiple times. Or to sum up, BECAUSE. And the response to your WHY?, is yes the Gen3 ont can do it all, but in NZ that's simply not the way the industry uses it, so you will need an extra piece of kit, a Router, that's it, nothing further to know.

Cyril


PaulL
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  #2780035 17-Sep-2021 20:00
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You don't.  You can plug the blue cable from your computer into the ONT, and configure your computer with the right software to get an IP address and work.

 

But if you want Wifi, more than one device in your house connected, a firewall, and any of the other things a router would provide, then you need a router.  

 

Strictly speaking you can use your computer as a router if you install pfsense or something like that on it.  But now it's not a computer, it's a router, and an expensive one that requires some skills to manage.  People mostly do that for fun, not because it saves money.  Because routers are so cheap (or free from your ISP).

 

EDIT: If your question is more "why do I have two boxes - an ONT and a Router - when I used to have only one box - a modem/router combined", then a different answer.  As others have noted, the ONT actually can do all those things.  But it's a pain for your ISP to use and support a Chorus-owned box.  So although the ONT can do it, your ISP doesn't use it, they find it easier to give you a new box.  That may be a good thing, a bad thing, or an annoying thing.  But it's the way it is.

 

EDIT2: Oops.  Should have checked time stamps before I decided to reply on a dead thread.  As you were.




freitasm
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  #2780097 18-Sep-2021 08:23
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PaulL:

 

EDIT2: Oops.  Should have checked time stamps before I decided to reply on a dead thread.  As you were.

 

 

Not a dead thread yet. Very good reply.





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Tinkerisk
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  #2780259 18-Sep-2021 15:12
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An ONT (optical network termination device) contains a Modem (i.e. in GER these can do nothing except converting optical signals into ETH and some optical  link diagnostics for the ISP). They always have to be followed by a router (or a single PC) to establish an internet connection.

 

Some ONTs contain a router, switch and AP as well. Then you should expect double NAT when you add a router to one of their ETH ports (if they don‘t have a bridge mode enabled to prevent this).

 

There are some fibre networks existent in the world which can directly connect to the optical SFP port of a router using a specific wavelength SFP module.





- NET: FTTH, OPNsense, 10G backbone, GWN APs, ipPBX
- SRV: HA server cluster, 95TB storage capacity on premise
- IoT:   zigbee, tasmota, BidCoS, LoRa, WX sensor suite, IR
- 3D:    two 3D printers, 3D scanner, CNC router, laser cutter


chevrolux
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  #2780297 18-Sep-2021 16:30
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Technically speaking I don't think we can say "modem" anymore. There's no modulating/demodulating going on, just routing.

And you can get a SFP connection from NZ ufb offerings, just not the $40/month ones lol.

OldGeek
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  #2780304 18-Sep-2021 16:42
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daringpeter:

 

Thanks to all who troubled to read my question/post. I'm not clear about the answer though. Bear with me while I put it really simply.

 

I receive 'internet' connectivity by ADSL. I have a modem connected to the phone line, with a cable to my box. It all works. I forget what hassles to get it to work, but browsers and Email are just fine. Now, if I get a 'fibre' connection, once an RSP connects me why cannot I plug that dinky blue cable into a suitable port on the Nokia ONT and off I go again? Eh?? Nokia advertises that that's  all....why do I need a router, free or otherwise-never needed one before...

 

 

In simple terms Fibre requires a router connected to the ONT.  The ONT is not supplied by your RSP and is supplied to be a router-feeder exclusively.  That really is all you need to know unless you have networking expertise with routers or equivalents.





-- 

OldGeek.




Tinkerisk
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  #2780360 18-Sep-2021 17:28
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chevrolux: Technically speaking I don't think we can say "modem" anymore. There's no modulating/demodulating going on, just routing.

 

When you need to convert V.35 to Eth? There is a (transmission related) protocol involved between the ONT and the ISP/RSP.

 

Not sure about: http://www.fiberopticshare.com/the-confusing-concept-of-optic-modem-and-media-converter.html





- NET: FTTH, OPNsense, 10G backbone, GWN APs, ipPBX
- SRV: HA server cluster, 95TB storage capacity on premise
- IoT:   zigbee, tasmota, BidCoS, LoRa, WX sensor suite, IR
- 3D:    two 3D printers, 3D scanner, CNC router, laser cutter


daringpeter

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  #2784289 25-Sep-2021 22:50
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Thank you,

 

As the site owner says, a very good reply.


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