Geekzone: technology news, blogs, forums
Guest
Welcome Guest.
You haven't logged in yet. If you don't have an account you can register now.


View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | ... | 27
Affiliate link
 
 
 

Affiliate link: Free kids accounts - trade shares and funds (NZ, US) with Sharesies.
MurrayM
2196 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified

  #2770442 2-Sep-2021 09:46
Send private message

I'm with Vodafone for my ISP (got moved to them when they bought Clear years ago) and I received a letter from them a week or so ago telling me that they were "switching you to one of our current broadband plans - but don't worry the monthly plan price your paying stays the same. Within the next 5-6 weeks we'll be moving you to an Unlimited - Fibre 100 broadband plan". My last invoice from them says that I'm on their "Unlimited Fibre 30" plan.

 

So does this move by Chorus mean that I'll actually end up getting 300/100?


Groucho
439 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2771110 3-Sep-2021 11:12
Send private message

openmedia:

 

I know some people who want a cheaper offering not a faster offering. Do you think there is a chance for a  lower price fibre offering appearing in the future?

 

 

I can think of some people who have no interest in speed and would appreciate a cheaper plan.  Think of all the retirees who only have an iPad to check email, banking and in the last couple of years have been forced into some form of video calling by their grandkids.  A 30/10 plan like I started with way back when would be perfect.

 

Otherwise if the upgrade to 300/100 is at no extra charge to the consumer then fantastic!


robjg63
3484 posts

Uber Geek


  #2771183 3-Sep-2021 12:22
Send private message

Groucho:

 

openmedia:

 

I know some people who want a cheaper offering not a faster offering. Do you think there is a chance for a  lower price fibre offering appearing in the future?

 

 

I can think of some people who have no interest in speed and would appreciate a cheaper plan.  Think of all the retirees who only have an iPad to check email, banking and in the last couple of years have been forced into some form of video calling by their grandkids.  A 30/10 plan like I started with way back when would be perfect.

 

Otherwise if the upgrade to 300/100 is at no extra charge to the consumer then fantastic!

 

 

I suspect the cost of the plans don't depend much on the connection speed, or the amount of data used. Providing a fibre cable to the premises and the cost of managing the infrastructure would be the lions share of the cost. Simply strangling the connection speed probably makes little real difference to the cost of providing the service.

 

One of the reasons Spark/Vodafone have been pushing 4G data/internet is because they don't have to use the Chorus network and can probably make a bit more money offering this sort of solution.

 

The cheaper plan you mention above is probably this: https://www.skinny.co.nz/jump/home/

 

 

 

 





Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself - A. H. Weiler




halper86
484 posts

Ultimate Geek

ID Verified

  #2771575 3-Sep-2021 17:07
Send private message

wratterus:

 

Wow this is great news! Will definitely change to this plan from Gigabit once my contract expires. Good on Chorus. 

 


Edit - could someone explain what this means in more basic terms? I get 2.5Mbps is CIR, but what is the difference between Low Class & High Class, and isn't low class CIR already 2.5Mbps?

 

 

 

I'm no expert on this topic, but from my understanding the low traffic class is the 'advertised speed' - which can be slowed down / delayed when traffic shaping occurs - causing the potential for some packet loss.

 

High class traffic has priority when traffic shaping occurs, allowing time sensitive traffic - such as VoIP - to be delivered without delay, and therefore no packet loss.


fe31nz
821 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2771868 4-Sep-2021 00:53
Send private message

As I understand it, the CIR (high class) bandwidth is all that you are guaranteed to get.  Whenever the traffic is more than the actual available bandwidth (from you and anyone else using the same path), packets will be dropped until the traffic meets the actual available bandwidth.  This happens in the transmit queue - when a packet arrives at the ONT's transmit queue, it will either be queued, or dropped.  The decision to drop a packet can potentially be quite a complex decision, but I doubt that is what your ONT will be doing as there is usually not much to be gained from using complex algorithms unless the available bandwidth is small (eg ADSL).

 

What most likely happens is that the DSCP bits on the packet are examined to see if they match one of the classes that gets to use the CIR bandwidth.  VOIP packets are normally marked with DSCP that will get them to use the CIR bandwidth, but if you have a good router (such as my EdgeRouter 4), you can tell the router what packets to map to use CIR bandwidth.  I have all packets with high DSCP priority mapped to use CIR.  If a packet that uses CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it, but there are non-CIR packets in the transmit buffer, one of the non-CIR packets will be dropped, most likely the non-CIR packet most recently queued.  If a packet that uses CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it and all the packets in the transmit buffer are CIR ones, it will be dropped.  If a packet that does not use CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it, it will be dropped.  This description is, of course, a bit simplified, but it covers the basics.

 

The TCP/IP protocol is sensitive to dropped packets and will adjust its transmit rate to stop packets being dropped.


sbiddle
30853 posts

Uber Geek

Retired Mod
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #2771895 4-Sep-2021 08:26
Send private message

fe31nz:

 

As I understand it, the CIR (high class) bandwidth is all that you are guaranteed to get.  Whenever the traffic is more than the actual available bandwidth (from you and anyone else using the same path), packets will be dropped until the traffic meets the actual available bandwidth.  This happens in the transmit queue - when a packet arrives at the ONT's transmit queue, it will either be queued, or dropped.  The decision to drop a packet can potentially be quite a complex decision, but I doubt that is what your ONT will be doing as there is usually not much to be gained from using complex algorithms unless the available bandwidth is small (eg ADSL).

 

What most likely happens is that the DSCP bits on the packet are examined to see if they match one of the classes that gets to use the CIR bandwidth.  VOIP packets are normally marked with DSCP that will get them to use the CIR bandwidth, but if you have a good router (such as my EdgeRouter 4), you can tell the router what packets to map to use CIR bandwidth.  I have all packets with high DSCP priority mapped to use CIR.  If a packet that uses CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it, but there are non-CIR packets in the transmit buffer, one of the non-CIR packets will be dropped, most likely the non-CIR packet most recently queued.  If a packet that uses CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it and all the packets in the transmit buffer are CIR ones, it will be dropped.  If a packet that does not use CIR arrives at the transmit buffer and there is no room for it, it will be dropped.  This description is, of course, a bit simplified, but it covers the basics.

 

The TCP/IP protocol is sensitive to dropped packets and will adjust its transmit rate to stop packets being dropped.

 

 

Just for clarification UFB in NZ (Chorus + LFCs) uses 802.1p tagging for the high priority CIR, not DSCP. 802.1p is layer 2 tagging, DSCP is layer 3.

 

 


cyril7
8735 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Subscriber

  #2771905 4-Sep-2021 08:50
Send private message

And to add, chorus and other fibre providers are only in the L2 game, any priority is limited to that and as such only have tag priority to work with.

Cyril



GGJohnstone
85 posts

Master Geek


  #2771944 4-Sep-2021 10:09
Send private message

This is programed in my location.  If it goes ahead and I benefit from it. Is there a need for hardware upgrades in my house. Wi Fi is a choke point now and I will need to fix that myself but I assume that the existing O N T is capable and constrained by 2 degrees to my paid for speed.

 

Where might outside plant be changed to boost the speeds or is it all software with Chorus just promising to meet the increased loading?


cyril7
8735 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Subscriber

  #2772000 4-Sep-2021 11:01
Send private message

Hi, so it will be within Chorus ISAM, not sure if there is a policier component in the ONT also, but there is nothing for you to do at your end. Your RSP may also need to adjust their policier (ie increase it from 100 to 300 etc).

 

The ONT is fully capable, its no different as if you were to move to a full 950/450 plan, its all done in Chorus's and your RSPs gear.

 

As to how various RSPs handle the change from an account perspective, time will tell

 

Cyril


wired
154 posts

Master Geek


  #2772379 5-Sep-2021 09:16
Send private message

cyril7: And to add, chorus and other fibre providers are only in the L2 game, any priority is limited to that and as such only have tag priority to work with.

Cyril

 

Agreed. They don’t use the Drop Eligible Indicator (DEI) from outside their networks which is used to indicate CIR versus EIR traffic in a layer 2 network. This is because they operate congestion free networks so the PCP and DEI marking are effectively redundant and wouldn’t make any difference if you did set them.


sbiddle
30853 posts

Uber Geek

Retired Mod
Trusted
Biddle Corp
Lifetime subscriber

  #2772446 5-Sep-2021 09:49
Send private message

One of the concerns for large RSP's must surely be a loss of revenue if people drop back from Gigabit plans - we know that average throughput of a Gigabit user is not really any different to somebody on a slower plan and many people are simply paying extra for Gigabit without actually having any real world use or seeing any real world benefits.With the increased upload speeds of this plan some smart people may se it as an opportunity to save money.

 

If people drop their plan RSP's won't see any change in bandwidth requirements, but they will be seeing reduced revenue from customers.

 

 


Senecio
1506 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified

  #2772451 5-Sep-2021 09:54
Send private message

I will drop back from my current Gig plan. I only have it because 20Mb upload is too slow on the base plans. 300/100 is more than sufficient for my needs. And most people’s needs I would argue.

quickymart
8779 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified

  #2772456 5-Sep-2021 10:19
Send private message

If they make it the same price as my current 100/20 plan, I'll be very happy. Even a slight increase would be okay - as long as it's not too much.


hio77
'That VDSL Cat'
12970 posts

Uber Geek

ID Verified
Trusted
Voyager
Subscriber

  #2772473 5-Sep-2021 11:11
Send private message

wired:

cyril7: And to add, chorus and other fibre providers are only in the L2 game, any priority is limited to that and as such only have tag priority to work with.

Cyril


Agreed. They don’t use the Drop Eligible Indicator (DEI) from outside their networks which is used to indicate CIR versus EIR traffic in a layer 2 network. This is because they operate congestion free networks so the PCP and DEI marking are effectively redundant and wouldn’t make any difference if you did set them.



Chorus's use of DEI if you have it enabled can actually cause havoc in some unique conditions...




#include <std_disclaimer>

 

Any comments made are personal opinion and do not reflect directly on the position my current or past employers may have.

 

 


Mahon
458 posts

Ultimate Geek


  #2772537 5-Sep-2021 14:54
Send private message

I have already dropped back from 1Gb to 100mb and noticed no difference. I guess al lot of people are over subscribed. It seems to depend on household size.


1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | ... | 27
View this topic in a long page with up to 500 replies per page Create new topic





News and reviews »

D-Link G415 4G Smart Router Review
Posted 27-Jun-2022 17:24


New Zealand Video Game Sales Reaches $540 Million
Posted 26-Jun-2022 14:49


Github Copilot Generally Available to All Developers
Posted 26-Jun-2022 14:37


Logitech G Introduces the New Astro A10 Headset
Posted 26-Jun-2022 14:20


Fitbit introduces Sleep Profiles
Posted 26-Jun-2022 14:11


Synology Introduces FlashStation FS3410
Posted 26-Jun-2022 14:04


Intel Arc A380 Graphics First Available in China
Posted 15-Jun-2022 17:08


JBL Introduces PartyBox Encore Essential Speaker
Posted 15-Jun-2022 17:05


New TVNZ+ streaming brand launches
Posted 13-Jun-2022 08:35


Chromecast With Google TV Review
Posted 10-Jun-2022 17:10


Xbox Gaming on Your Samsung Smart TV No Console Required
Posted 10-Jun-2022 00:01


Xbox Cloud Gaming Now Available in New Zealand
Posted 10-Jun-2022 00:01


HP Envy Inspire 7900e Review
Posted 9-Jun-2022 20:31


Philips Hue Starter Kit Review
Posted 4-Jun-2022 11:10


Sony Expands Its Wireless Speaker X-series Range
Posted 4-Jun-2022 10:25









Geekzone Live »

Try automatic live updates from Geekzone directly in your browser, without refreshing the page, with Geekzone Live now.



Are you subscribed to our RSS feed? You can download the latest headlines and summaries from our stories directly to your computer or smartphone by using a feed reader.