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  Reply # 310687 24-Mar-2010 12:35
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verakot: So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?
Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?


For PBX systems, generally it will be a '1' or a '9' - BUT it will depend entirely on the PBX installed and the configuration.

VoIP systems will also depend entirely on the programming.  I used to have an SPA3000 which at times has been programmed with AU, US and NZ tones, along with programming that let me key in 2 digits for favourites, mobile numbers being pushed out to a VoIP provider, whilst local numbers were out through the PSTN.

I mention this as you may very well come across people that have quite unique setups ...

I mention this just so that you keep in mind that configuration will be a determining factor in what happens ... 



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  Reply # 311106 25-Mar-2010 03:06
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wazzageek:
verakot:?So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?
Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?


For PBX systems, generally it will be a '1' or a '9' - BUT it will depend entirely on the PBX installed and the configuration.

VoIP systems will also depend entirely on the programming. ?I used to have an SPA3000 which at times has been programmed with AU, US and NZ tones, along with programming that let me key in 2 digits for favourites, mobile numbers being pushed out to a VoIP provider, whilst local numbers were out through the PSTN.

I mention this as you may very well come across people that have quite unique setups ...

I mention this just so that you keep in mind that configuration will be a determining factor in what happens ...?


wazzageek, thanks, this is very useful. Do you have any proof - such as manual for example, for a PBX system, that shows that the escape digit can be programmed to any number from a 1 to a 9?
Also in your experience, how often does it happen (%)?

Re VoIP: Are you saying there could be 2 digit escape to outside line?

 
 
 
 


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  Reply # 311107 25-Mar-2010 03:33
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grant_k:
verakot: So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?
Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?

PBXs that I have encountered use a 1 or 9 prefix to get an outside line.? I believe there are others that use a 0, but I have never seen 8 used.

Another thing:? Phone Numbers in NZ are NOT 10-digits.? They are 7-digit if you are dialling within the Local Calling Area to which you are connected, or 9-digit if you are making a National Toll Call.

Then of course, there are mobile numbers which all have a 3-digit prefix, followed by 6, 7 or 8 further digits.

Nothing so simple as a US-style 10-digit number I'm afraid.? But it's good for us because when making landline calls, we usually only have to dial 7 digits instead of 10.? With mobile calls, the 3-digit prefix is always used, even if you are dialling another mobile on the same network.


grant_k, LennonNZ:

1. We got a Nationwide number, which is a 10 digit (at least what AT&T gave us), the format is 0508 555 555. I assume that if you dial this number from ANY location in NZ, you should get connected. Is this correct?

2. For PBX systems, including Centrex, they would need to dial N-0508 555 555, where N is the outside line access digit, ranging from 0 to 9, depending on local PBX configuration (and considering that 1 and 9 digits are used more frequently). Is this a correct statement?

grant_k, If you are talking about 3 digit numbers for mobile phones, than it should not apply since our device is intended for fixed land lines only. Unless I misunderstood your point.


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  Reply # 311111 25-Mar-2010 07:31
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verakot:
grant_k:
verakot: So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?
Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?

PBXs that I have encountered use a 1 or 9 prefix to get an outside line.? I believe there are others that use a 0, but I have never seen 8 used.

Another thing:? Phone Numbers in NZ are NOT 10-digits.? They are 7-digit if you are dialling within the Local Calling Area to which you are connected, or 9-digit if you are making a National Toll Call.

Then of course, there are mobile numbers which all have a 3-digit prefix, followed by 6, 7 or 8 further digits.

Nothing so simple as a US-style 10-digit number I'm afraid.? But it's good for us because when making landline calls, we usually only have to dial 7 digits instead of 10.? With mobile calls, the 3-digit prefix is always used, even if you are dialling another mobile on the same network.


grant_k, LennonNZ:

1. We got a Nationwide number, which is a 10 digit (at least what AT&T gave us), the format is 0508 555 555. I assume that if you dial this number from ANY location in NZ, you should get connected. Is this correct?

2. For PBX systems, including Centrex, they would need to dial N-0508 555 555, where N is the outside line access digit, ranging from 0 to 9, depending on local PBX configuration (and considering that 1 and 9 digits are used more frequently). Is this a correct statement?

grant_k, If you are talking about 3 digit numbers for mobile phones, than it should not apply since our device is intended for fixed land lines only. Unless I misunderstood your point.



1 - 0508 xxx xxx numbers (like 1-888 numbers in the states) are toll free numbers from anywhere in New Zealand. Good
2 - Yes 100% correct.. but saying that you _may_ want the ability to dial more than 1 "outside line" number just incase.




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  Reply # 311112 25-Mar-2010 07:34
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LennonNZ:
verakot:
grant_k:
verakot: So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?
Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?

PBXs that I have encountered use a 1 or 9 prefix to get an outside line.? I believe there are others that use a 0, but I have never seen 8 used.

Another thing:? Phone Numbers in NZ are NOT 10-digits.? They are 7-digit if you are dialling within the Local Calling Area to which you are connected, or 9-digit if you are making a National Toll Call.

Then of course, there are mobile numbers which all have a 3-digit prefix, followed by 6, 7 or 8 further digits.

Nothing so simple as a US-style 10-digit number I'm afraid.? But it's good for us because when making landline calls, we usually only have to dial 7 digits instead of 10.? With mobile calls, the 3-digit prefix is always used, even if you are dialling another mobile on the same network.


grant_k, LennonNZ:

1. We got a Nationwide number, which is a 10 digit (at least what AT&T gave us), the format is 0508 555 555. I assume that if you dial this number from ANY location in NZ, you should get connected. Is this correct?

2. For PBX systems, including Centrex, they would need to dial N-0508 555 555, where N is the outside line access digit, ranging from 0 to 9, depending on local PBX configuration (and considering that 1 and 9 digits are used more frequently). Is this a correct statement?

grant_k, If you are talking about 3 digit numbers for mobile phones, than it should not apply since our device is intended for fixed land lines only. Unless I misunderstood your point.



1 - 0508 xxx xxx numbers (like 1-888 numbers in the states) are toll free numbers from anywhere in New Zealand. Good
2 - Yes 100% correct.. but saying that you _may_ want the ability to dial more than 1 "outside line" number just incase.



>> you _may_ want the ability to dial more than 1 "outside line" number just incase

Could you give me an example of a system in NZ that uses more than 1 digit for outside line access?

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  Reply # 311115 25-Mar-2010 07:44
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I know of none off hand but I've seen some PABXs/Systems which the modems dial too fast after the initial digit becuase of the way some PABX's work so I've had to add "1," in the dial string so it dials 1 then waits 2 seconds and then the normal number. The , (comma) is a 2 second wait on modems when dialing.



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  Reply # 311120 25-Mar-2010 08:08
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LennonNZ: I know of none off hand but I've seen some PABXs/Systems which the modems dial too fast after the initial digit becuase of the way some PABX's work so I've had to add "1," in the dial string so it dials 1 then waits 2 seconds and then the normal number. The , (comma) is a 2 second wait on modems when dialing.


But it does not mean that you need to use 2-digit number for the outside line access?

My another specific question is:

I want to make sure that diling a '9' or an '8' on any Phone Service Provider in New Zealand would not give me a voice response within 3-4 seconds after this digit is dialed.

Can somebody confirm that?

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  Reply # 311124 25-Mar-2010 08:18
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verakot:
Could you give me an example of a system in NZ that uses more than 1 digit for outside line access?


Do you mean a 2 predigit to access the outside line or multiple single digit numbers to access outside lines?

I've never come across a 2 digit predidit but have come across systems where people configure different predigits for different trunks, ie PSTN and a VoIP operator. This is a rather illogical thing to do and would be far better handled in a dialplan but if you're using something like Microsoft Response Point you can't do this and are forced to offer different predigits if you're mixing PSTN and SIP lines.

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  Reply # 311126 25-Mar-2010 08:22
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No the , is a standard modem command to wait 2 seconds. Its just 1 (wait 2 seconds) 555 555 for example. As far as I know (unless you are goign thru a strange PABX) you will not get a voice message or any kind after dialing a 8 or 9.

As it was said in the past it would be better for you to employ someone for a short time for testing/development in NZ instead of getting 3rd hard information from this forum (which may be correct or not).




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  Reply # 311129 25-Mar-2010 08:31
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sbiddle:
verakot:
Bung:
old3eyes:

Dial any single number on a PSTN line in NZ and you won't get dial tone only on a PBX system..?


1 is the escape digit from Centrex or PABX but you may not get a second dial tone. Some systems may require a valid number to be dialled in addition before forwarding the call.


Can you or somebody else confirm that? We are expecting a dialtone when an escape digit is dialed on the PABX/PBX systems. What do you get instead - no dial tone? Then a busy signal after 10 sec?


1 is a predigit for Centrex lines but doesn't give a 2nd dialtone, it's just part of the number.




sbiddle, is it documented anywhere that dialing a dial-out digit does not give a 2nd dial tone? Could you point to any source for that? I find this very important.

Thanks!

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  Reply # 311130 25-Mar-2010 08:33
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verakot:
sbiddle:
verakot:
Bung:
old3eyes:

Dial any single number on a PSTN line in NZ and you won't get dial tone only on a PBX system..?


1 is the escape digit from Centrex or PABX but you may not get a second dial tone. Some systems may require a valid number to be dialled in addition before forwarding the call.


Can you or somebody else confirm that? We are expecting a dialtone when an escape digit is dialed on the PABX/PBX systems. What do you get instead - no dial tone? Then a busy signal after 10 sec?


1 is a predigit for Centrex lines but doesn't give a 2nd?dialtone, it's just part of the number.



So 1 is a digit to escape from PBX, then you need to dial a regular 10-digit number, correct?

Are therey eny other escape numbers, such as 8 for instance?


9 is also used as a trunk access code.  I have also seen 0 (zero) used here on some Australian owned businesses operating in NZ..   Also be aware that the dial tone you get when you dial the outside line  may not be from the PSTN but a dummy tone from the PBX system especially if the PBX is using ARS translation..




Regards,

Old3eyes


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  Reply # 311131 25-Mar-2010 08:34
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sbiddle: Do you mean a 2 predigit to access the outside line or multiple single digit numbers to access outside lines?

I've never come across a 2 digit predidit but have come across systems where people configure different predigits for different trunks, ie PSTN and a VoIP operator. This is a rather illogical thing to do and would be far better handled in a dialplan but if you're using something like Microsoft Response Point you can't do this and are forced to offer different predigits if you're mixing PSTN and SIP lines.

I've come across 3-digit predigits and also various weird codes ("#501", "**170") for seizing a specific outside trunk.

The office I'm currently working in (not NZ) uses '03' for external trunks.  We have a separate code for long distance which uses least-cost-routing.

Edit: oh and I've come across *plenty* of broken toll-barring implementations that restrict all STD access, including toll-free (0508, 0800) numbers.  This may give you a voice message in response saying the number is invalid; but I can't think of anything offhand that gives you a voice response for dialling 0/1/9 or other trunk access codes.  I can also think of plenty of PBXs that give you a voice message the second you pick up a line ("Please enter your personal code", "You have voicemail waiting", "You have active call diverts") which may or may not be a problem.

Also thinking about other error situations, when there is IN overload or a switching problem between operators you may get a voice message telling you about it ("The number you have called cannot be reached", "The call cannot be completed as dialled", etc).

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  Reply # 311133 25-Mar-2010 08:46
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"I am my colleagues are working on a medical device that connects to a server using internal modem. This device is intended for elder people, so it is going to be used for their homes."

Isn't some of the discussion about complicated trunk accessing overthinking the problem? If you are in an instition ring the local buzzer for help.



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  Reply # 311134 25-Mar-2010 08:51
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Bung: "I am my colleagues are working on a medical device that connects to a server using internal modem. This device is intended for elder people, so it is going to be used for their homes."

Isn't some of the discussion about complicated trunk accessing overthinking the problem? If you are in an instition ring the local buzzer for help.


Actually this is a good discussion since the device could be used in retirement homes which may have PBX/PABX phone systems.

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  Reply # 311139 25-Mar-2010 09:07
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It's also worth noting that with the move to VoIP here there is no guarantee of any modem based devices working over VoIP lines. If you're in an area that's already got fibre then any current devices that use a modem such as MySky, a residential alarm or medical alarms are not guaranteed to work.

Right now I'd be building a device that has ethernet support. With many residential alarms that use ContactID (DTMF based) it's possible to use adapters that grab the line, detect these codes and send them over the internet. With a modem this isn't quite so easily done.

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